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Torus fracture

Torus fractures (also known as buckle fractures) are incomplete fractures of the shaft of a long bone that is characterised by bulging of the cortex. They usually result from trabecular compression from an axial loading force (along long axis of bone). Usually seen in children, frequently involving the distal radial metaphysis.

Pathophysiology

Cortical buckle fractures occur when there is axial loading of a long bone. This most commonly occurs at the distal radius following a fall on an outstretched arm: the force is transmitted from carpus to the distal radius and the point of least resistance fractures - usually the dorsal cortex of the distal radius.

Radiographic features

Plain film
  • distinct fracture lines are not seen
  • subtle deformity or buckle of the cortex may be evident
  • in some cases, angulation is the only diagnostic clue

Treatment and prognosis

They are self limiting and do not require operative intervention. Sometimes a cast may be applied, but often a splint is all that is required with period of rest and immobilisation.

Etymology

The term torus is derived from the Latin word tori which means protuberance.


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