This site is targeted at medical and radiology professionals, contains user contributed content, and material that may be confusing to a lay audience. Use of this site implies acceptance of our Terms of Use.

Creative Commons Licence

To allow the best compromise between allowing easy legal access to content on and simultaneously ensuring that contributing users maintain control over both attribution and commercial use of images submitted, all content is provided under a modified Creative Commons Attribution-Non-commercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. Further details of these modifications are outlined in our Terms of Use.  By browsing our site you create an agreement with us and agree to be bound by these terms of use. 

Human-readable summary

This summary does not replace the full licence, nor the modifications outlined in our terms of use, but it should help you make sense of how you can and can't use content on Radiopaedia. 

  • full Creative commons license is available here
  •'s terms of use are available here
Under our terms of use...


you may

  • copy contents and
  • alter / build upon it

as long as you

  • attribute the work appropriately (see below)
  • re-license it under the same license, and
  • do not use the work commercially (either directly or indirectly)



If you would like to obtain permission to use content from outside of this license it is certainly possible.

In the case of images submitted by users, please contact us and we will pass on the request to the user.

In the case of text which forms the part of an article, then please contact directly at

How to attribute content

Attribution for images

Please include both the name of the contributing user and

  • e.g. Case courtesy of Dr Robert Jones,

If you are using the work online, then please also include a direct link to the original case, to the home page and to this licence page.

  • Case courtesy of Dr Ian Bickle, <a href=""></a>. From the case <a href="">Right upper lobe collapse</a>
Attribution of text

Please simply reference it as you would another text source

  • e.g. "Thyroid neoplasms"

Again if your work is online, please include a link back to the original article.

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