Abdominal hernia

Last revised by Dr Yusra Sheikh on 30 Oct 2021

Abdominal hernias (herniae also used) may be congenital or acquired and come with varying eponyms. They are distinguished primarily based on location and content. 75-80% of all hernias are inguinal.

Content of the hernia is variable, and may include:

Complications predominantly relate to bowel incarceration, strangulation, and intestinal obstruction. Large diaphragmatic hernias in infancy may be complicated by pulmonary hypoplasia.

Classification
  1. external herniation
    • ventral: anterior and lateral abdominal hernias
    • dorsal
    • groin: most common
  2. diaphragmatic herniation
  3. internal herniation
Subclassification

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Cases and figures

  • Case 1: indirect inguinal hernia
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  • Case 2: bilateral direct inguinal herniation
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  • Case 3: femoral hernia
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  • Case 4: obturator hernia
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  • Case 5: incisional hernia
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  • Case 6: Spigelian hernia
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  • Case 7: umbilical hernia : on ultrasound
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  • Case 8: Richter hernia
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  • Case 9: sliding hiatal hernia
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  • Case 10: hiatal and morgagni hernias
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  • Case 11: para-esophageal hiatal hernia
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  • Case 12: Maydl hernia
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  • Case 13: pantaloon hernia
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  • Case 14: posterior rectus sheath hernia
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  • Case 15: port site hernia
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  • Case 16: indirect Amyand hernia
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  • Case 17: ventral hernia
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