Cerebral hemiatrophy

Cerebral hemiatrophy has a variety of causes, and is generally associated with seizures and hemiplegia. Causes include:

Radiographic features

The resultant reduction in cerebral volume, if early enough, can lead to changes in the skull, known as Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome.

Changes within the brain parenchyma typically demonstrate:

  • thinning of the grey matter cortex
  • reduced volume of the underlying white matter +/- reduced/abnormal myelination
  • enlargement of the lateral ventricle
  • reduced size of cerebral peduncle (ipsilateral)
  • reduced size of cerebellar hemisphere (contralateral)

Differential diagnosis

A potential pitfall is assuming the 'small' side is the abnormality. Thus hemimegalencephaly or gliomatosis cerebri or widespread cortical dysplasia should be considered.

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Article information

rID: 7863
Synonyms or Alternate Spellings:
  • Hemiatrophy of the brain

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Cases and figures

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    Case 1: idiopathic : FLAIR
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    Sturge Weber synd...
    Case 2: Sturge Weber syndrome
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    Case 3: Rasmussen encephalitis
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