Pelvis (Judet view)

Last revised by Travis Fahrenhorst-Jones on 02 Jul 2022

The oblique internal and external pelvis views otherwise known as the Judet view are additional projections to the pelvic series when there is suspicion of an acetabular fracture.

The Judet views are comprised of two projections.

First the iliac oblique for assessment of the ilioischial line of the posterior column, the posterior column, the roof of the acetabulum,  and Iliac crest.

Secondly, the obturator oblique view demonstrating the iliopectineal line of the anterior column, the anterior column of the pelvis, the posterior acetabular wall and the obturator foramen.

  • iliac oblique
    • patient is supine
    • the unaffected side is rotated roughly 45° anterior, generally aided by a 45° sponge
    • central beam directed vertically toward the affected hip
    • it is advisable that the patient is positioned central on the table and at no risk of over-rolling
  • obturator oblique
    • patient is supine
    • the affected side is rotated roughly 45° anterior, generally aided by a 45° sponge
    • central beam directed vertically toward the affected hip
    • ensure the patient is central on the table and at no risk of over rolling
  • anteroposterior projection
  • centering point
    • iliac oblique
      • 5 cm distal and 5 cm medial of the ASIS closest to the image receptor
    • obturator oblique
      • 5 cm distal and 5 cm medial of the ASIS that is rolled up anterior to the image receptor
  • collimation
    • superior to the level of the ASIS
    • inferior to the proximal femur
    • laterally to the skin margins
    • medially to the pubic symphysis
  • orientation  
    • portrait
  • detector size
    • 24 cm x 30 cm
  • exposure
    • 70-80 kVp
    • 10-20 mAs
  • SID
    • 100 cm
  • grid
    • yes

The iliac oblique projection should demonstrate the anterior rim of the acetabulum as well as the posterior ilioischial column. The iliac wing, as it is 'flatten' out on the image, should be well demonstrated.

The obturator oblique projection should distinctly show the posterior rim as well as the anterior ilioischial line. As per the name, the obturator foramen is well demonstrated.

The 'Judet view' is a two-part view of the acetabulum, the collimation of the Judet views is departmentally dependent.

Some institutions will advise the Judet views are done as a full two view oblique pelvis (see figure 1 and 2). In this case, it would be a landscape projection with a full-sized detector, with the same centering parameters as the AP pelvis.

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Cases and figures

  • Figure 1: annotated pelvic anatomy
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  • Figure 2: Judet view (LPO - right hip elevated)
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  • Figure 3: Judet view (RPO - left hip elevated)
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  • Figure 4: annotated Iliac oblique view
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  • Figure 5: annotated obturator oblique view
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  • Case 1: posterior acetabular fracture
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