Prévost sign (eyes)

A.Prof Frank Gaillard et al.

The Prévost sign, also known as the Vulpian sign, refers to conjugate ocular deviation in patients with acute cortical hemiparetic stroke.

The direction is variable, depending on the location of the stroke 3.

In a hemispheric stroke, the eyes usually deviate towards the lesion (away from the hemiparesis). The degree of deviation may be exaggerated when the head is turned in the same direction. It is most pronounced with non-dominant hemisphere (thus right) lesions 2-3

Involvement of the thalamus, on the other hand, usually results in conjugate gaze deviation away from the lesion and thus towards the side of hemiparesis 3

History and etymology

It is named after Jean Louis Prévost, Swiss physician (1838-1927) and Edme Felix Alfred Vulpian (1826 -1887)  4.

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Article information

rID: 5606
Section: Signs
Synonyms or Alternate Spellings:
  • Prévost's sign
  • Vulpian's sign
  • Vulpian sign (eyes)

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