Radial artery

Dr Tommy Brennan et al.

The radial artery is a terminal branch of the brachial artery and arises at the cubital fossa of the forearm. It is one of the main arteries of the forearm, along with the ulnar artery.

Summary

  • origin: terminal branch of the brachial artery
  • location: inferior aspect of the cubital fossa
  • supply: elbow joint, lateral forearm muscles, radial nerve, carpal bones and joints, thumb, and lateral side of the index finger
  • main branches: radial recurrent artery, palmar carpal branch, dorsal carpal branch, and muscular branches

Gross anatomy

Origin

The radial artery originates at the cubital fossa as a terminal branch of the brachial artery.1

Course

The radial artery runs along the radial aspect of the forearm under the brachioradialis, lateral to the flexor carpi radialis tendon. For the distal section of its course, the radial artery lies on the surface of the radius. The radial artery proceeds along the floor of the anatomical snuff box, passing dorsally around the scaphoid and trapezium. At the carpal region of the hand, the radial artery forms the deep palmar arch of the hand and anastomoses with the ulnar artery.1

Branches

The branches of the radial artery include the radial recurrent artery, the palmar and dorsal carpal branches, and the muscular branches.1

Termination

The radial artery terminates in the hand, anastomosing with the ulnar artery, and forming the deep palmar arch.1

Supply

The radial artery provides blood supply to the elbow joint, lateral forearm muscles, radial nerve, carpal bones and joints, thumb, and lateral side of the index finger.2

Upper limb anatomy
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Article Information

rID: 51521
Section: Anatomy
Synonyms or Alternate Spellings:

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