Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

1,394 results found
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Normal imaging examples

This article lists examples of normal imaging divided by body region and system. brain head and neck spine chest breast gastrointestinal genitourinary hepatobiliary upper limb lower limb pediatrics
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Traditional serrated adenoma

Traditional serrated adenomas are a type of premalignant serrated colonic polyp. Epidemiology They are thought to account for <1% of all colonic polyps and 1-7% of all serrated lesions. They tend to occur in older patients (usually over 50 years) with no significant gender predilection. Patho...
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Acute esophageal necrosis

Acute esophageal necrosis (sometimes known as Black esophagus or esophageal stroke), is a rare entity characterized by patchy or diffuse circumferential black pigmentation of the esophageal mucosa from ischemic necrosis. It is classically characterized by a striking endoscopic image of diffuse,...
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Splenectomy

A splenectomy is the surgical removal of the spleen. This can be partial or total, however a partial splenectomy is rarely performed due to an increased risk of complications compared to a total splenectomy 1. Indications Indications for a splenectomy can be divided into absolute and relative ...
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Decreased duodenal folds

Decreased duodenal folds may be seen on imaging modalities, particularly MR enterography, and differential diagnoses include: scleroderma - usually with duodenal dilatation celiac disease - particularly involves the distal duodenum and jejunum Crohn disease  cystic fibrosis amyloidosis
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Nontoxic megacolon

Nontoxic megacolon refers to colonic dilatation of more than 6 cm in an adult without mural abnormality. This is in contrast to toxic megacolon, an acute complication accompanied by mural abnormalities such as thickening, loss of haustral folds, pneumatosis or free gas. The differential diagnos...
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Bowel wall fat deposition

Bowel wall fat deposition refers to the infiltration of the submucosa with fat and usually occurs in chronic processes such as inflammatory bowel disease, causing characteristic fat halo sign on CT images.  Other differential diagnoses include: normal variant - particularly in obese patients w...
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Bowel wall calcification

Bowel wall calcification is not common and can occur secondary to various mechanisms due to benign, premalignant, or malignant lesions. The differential diagnoses include:  mucinous adenocarcinoma gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) metastatic calcification - due to renal failure hemangio...
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Esophageal balloon tamponade device

An esophageal balloon tamponade device is a form of balloon catheter designed to exert direct pressure on bleeding gastro-esophageal varices in order to obtain hemostasis. It is considered a temporizing measure in hemodynamically unstable patients in whom endoscopic (or angiographic) interventio...
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Feces

Feces, also known as stool, is the solid component of human waste. Almost half of its dry mass is bacterial biomass, with the remainder comprised of undigested dietary matter, exfoliated cells of the gut, intestinal secretions, small metabolites and mucus.  Composition Fecal matter is semisoli...
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Gastrocolic fistula

A gastrocolic fistula (plural: fistulas/fistulae), also known as cologastric fistula, is a rare form of gut fistulisation between the stomach and the colon. Terminology Gastrocolic fistula, is much more common in the literature than its synonym cologastric fistula, which is in line with the co...
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Pseudokidney sign (colonic carcinoma)

The pseudokidney sign is a non-specific sonographic sign that describes the reniform shape of a mass with a hypoechoic region (representing bowel wall thickening) surrounding a central hyperechoic portion or echogenic stripe (which represents the apposition of the mucosal surfaces) 1,2.  It can...
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Gastropancreatic fistula

A gastropancreatic fistula is a rare form of gut fistulation where there is a fistulous communication between the stomach and the pancreas. It has been described in association with chronic pancreatitis 1 / severe pancreatitis intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) 4 peptic ulcers 2 ...
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Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia describes an abnormally low blood glucose level (<4 mmol/L). It is a common clinical problem in diabetics overtreated with glucose lowering agents. Clinical presentation Signs of hypoglycemia include: dizziness tremors, palpitations and anxiety hunger sweating confusion fati...
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Zebra sign (disambiguation)

The evocative appearance of the coat of a zebra has been used for several distinctive signs in radiology: zebra sign: cerebellar hemorrhage 1 zebra sign: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 zebra spleen: arterial phase appearance of normal spleen 4,5 zebra stripe sign: treated osteogenesis imper...
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Complications of radiation therapy

Radiation therapy has the potential to cause complications in many organ systems, many of which, especially in the thorax, are important for radiologists to be aware of.  acute radiation syndrome complications of cranial radiation therapy radiation-induced cerebral vasculopathy radiation-ind...
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Gastrointestinal stents

Gastrointestinal (GI) stents are increasingly used to treat obstruction of the GI tract, most commonly due to malignancy. Types of stent esophageal stent gastric stent duodenal stent enteric stent colorectal stent History and etymology Somewhat surprisingly the word 'stent' is actually a...
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Glasgow-Blatchford score

The Glasgow-Blatchford score (GBS) is a widely-used and well-validated scoring system for upper GI bleeding and the need for intervention. Score The scoring system relies upon knowing the patient's urea, hemoglobin, systolic blood pressure, and several other criteria. Each criterion is scored,...
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Colorectal cancer (TNM staging 7th edition)

The 7th edition of the TNM classification of colorectal carcinomas was proposed in 2010, and has now been updated and replaced by the 8th edition, published in 2016. Primary tumor staging (T) Tx: primary tumor cannot be assessed T0: no evidence of primary tumor Tis: carcinoma in situ T1: in...
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Traction esophageal diverticulum

A traction esophageal diverticulum is a true esophageal diverticulum (i.e. includes all layers of the esophageal wall) which occurs secondary to pulling forces (traction) on the esophageal wall. Causes pulmonary or mediastinal scarring, fibrosis inflammatory processes in the mediastinum (for ...
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Scaphoid abdomen

Scaphoid abdomen is the term given to an inward concavity of the anterior abdominal wall. It is used both for the clinical appearance and its radiological equivalent.  In children it maybe a sign of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In both adult and pediatric patients, it raises the possibility...
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N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate pulmonary embolism

N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate pulmonary embolism is a potentially life-threatening complication that can arise following the use of the tissue glue, butyl-cyanoacrylate, for endoscopic sclerotherapy to treat variceal bleeding. Epidemiology Sclerosis with biological glue (butyl cyanoacrylate) is curr...
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Water-soluble contrast challenge

A water-soluble contrast challenge (more widely known as a Gastrografin challenge) is a combined diagnostic study and therapeutic intervention utilized in the evaluation and management of small bowel obstruction. It is used when clinical or imaging features determine there to be small bowel obst...
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Pica

Pica refers to a psychiatric disorder in which patients report a craving for and compulsive consumption of substances that are not food. Substances consumed include earth, clay, plaster, paint chips, string, hair, animal feces and stones 1.  Epidemiology Although the condition can present in a...
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Congenital pouch colon

Congenital pouch colons are an anomaly in which there is cystic dilation of a shortened colon. They can either partially or totally replace the colon. Pathology Associations Congenital pouch colons can be associated with vaginal or vestibular fistulas and less frequently with other genitourin...
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Sliding hiatus hernia

A sliding hiatus hernia or type 1 hiatus hernia is considered the most common type of hiatus hernia. They can be present to varying degrees and can also co-exist with other types (inclusive of a rolling hiatus hernia). Clinical presentation Many patients may have gastro-esophageal reflux. Some...
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Timed barium esophagogram

The timed barium esophagogram (TBO) is a simple physiologic assessment and objective method for assessing the esophageal emptying used in patients with suspected achalasia and to evaluate and follow up patients who have been treated with myotomy or pneumatic dilatation1,3. Technique Several te...
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Mackler's triad

Mackler's triad consists of the clinical symptoms of vomiting, followed by severe pain in the chest, usually retrosternal, lower thoracic, and upper abdominal, associated with subcutaneous emphysema detected on physical examination, which is suggestive of esophageal rupture (Boerhaave syndrome) ...
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Anderson triad

The Anderson triad consists of the clinical findings of tachypnea and abdominal rigidity with lower thoracic or epigastric pain, associated with subcutaneous emphysema, which is usually related to esophageal rupture. 
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Subhepatic appendicitis

Subhepatic appendicitis refers to inflammation of the appendix in which the appendix and cecum have failed to descend inferiorly during normal development; resulting in a "subhepatic" position. Epidemiology Presentation of an inflamed subhepatic appendix is exceedingly uncommon, representing o...
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Double beak sign

The double beak sign refers to the sudden tapering that two adjacent intestinal loops show in the internal hernia at the transition point of the closed loop obstruction. The marked reduction in caliber results in distension of the afferent and efferent intestinal loops. History and etymology I...
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Crescent sign (disambiguation)

The characteristic shape of the crescent has been given to many radiological signs over the years. crescent sign (disambiguation) crescent sign (arterial dissection) crescent sign (inguinal hernia) crescent sign (intravenous pyelogram) crescent sign (lung hydatid) crescent sign (osteonecro...
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Intussusception (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Intussusception occurs when a loop of bowel is pulled into the lumen of a distal bowel loop, and is an important cause of acute abdominal pain, particularly in young children. Reference article This is a summary article; ...
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Corkscrew sign (diffuse esophageal spasm)

A corkscrew esophagus, also known as a rosary bead esophagus, is a classic appearance of distal esophageal spasm on a barium swallow. It is actually quite a rare appearance which is seen in <5% cases of distal esophageal spasm. The finding is caused by multiple tertiary (non-propulsive) contract...
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Superficial epigastric vein

The superficial epigastric vein (TA: vena epigastrica superficialis) is an important tributary of the great saphenous vein that drains the anterior abdominal wall inferior to the level of the umbilicus. The superficial epigastric vein drains into the great saphenous vein at the saphenous openin...
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Anal canal diverticulum

Diverticula of the anal canal are very rare with only a few cases reported in the global literature. Clinical presentation Patients have presented with anorectal bleeding and/or pain. Radiographic features The few cases have either not been characterized on imaging or only imaged on barium s...
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Intramural pseudocyst

Intramural pseudocysts are a rare form of pancreatic pseudocysts that occur within the wall of the upper gastrointestinal tract. They may result in gastric outlet obstruction. Pathology Size They can considerably vary in size with one study reporting a range of 8 mm to 8 cm 1. Location Repo...
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Bowler hat sign

The bowler hat sign refers to an appearance on a GI contrast study, which may be seen with both polyps and diverticula of the bowel. The filling defect produced by the pathology mimics the outline of a bowler hat. It was originally described for colonic lesions, but can be seen with lesions thro...
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Cameron lesions

Cameron lesions refer to linear ulcers or erosions that occur on the mucosal folds at the diaphragmatic impression of a hiatus hernia. They are usually radiographically occult and diagnosed endoscopically (although still useful for a radiologist to know). Epidemiology Their prevalence has been...
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Clermont score

The Clermont or DWI-MaRIA scoring system is used to assess ileocolonic Crohn disease activity on noncontrast MRI enterography. It is based on the earlier Magnetic Resonance Index of Activity (MaRIA) index, however, it does not require intravenous gadolinium by substituting relative contrast enha...
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Cholecystocolonic fistula

Cholecystocolonic fistulas are most commonly a rare late complication of gallstone disease, resulting from an abnormal communication between the gallbladder and the colon. It is the second most common cholecystoenteric fistula after cholecystoduodenal fistulas 1.  Clinical presentation These m...
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Magnetic Resonance Index of Activity (MaRIA)

The Magnetic Resonance Index of Activity (MaRIA) scoring system is used to assess ileocolonic Crohn disease activity on contrast-enhanced MRI enterography. The segmental index represents disease severity in one bowel segment, whilst assessing six defined anatomic regions these can be combined in...
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Rectal MRI (an approach)

Rectal MRI is a key imaging investigation in the diagnosis, staging and follow up of rectal cancer. An increase in the utility of rectal MRI as been driven by the recognition of the mesorectum as a distinct anatomic compartment containing and limiting the margins of the rectum, and forming a sur...
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Dolichocolon

Dolichocolon refers to an abnormally elongated redundant colon. It is considered a developmental variant.  Clinical presentation The main symptoms and signs of dolichocolon are: constipation abdominal pain abdominal distension volvulus However, dolichocolon is a contentious entity, and so...
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Interstitial cells of Cajal

The interstitial cells of Cajal are mesenchymal cells closely apposed to neural and smooth muscle cells of the gut. They form a heterogeneous group with differing ultrastructure and functions. One cell type has an ancillary neural function as a gastrointestinal pacemaker, generating electrical s...
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Odynophagia

Odynophagia is the term given for painful swallowing.  Pathology It can arise from a number of causes which include esophageal inflammation - esophagitis esophageal infection substernal dysphagia tonsillitis pharyngitis esophageal spasm See also dysphagia: difficulty swallowing.
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Incompetent ileocecal valve

An incompetent ileocecal valve is a situation where there can be reflux of backward flow of food content from the large bowel (cecum) through to the small bowel (terminal ileum) and through the ileocecal valve. A low degree of incompetence is not an uncommon finding 3. In some states, patients m...
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Sphincter (disambiguation)

A sphincter (TA: musculus sphincter) is a term used in anatomy to refer a ring of muscle which narrows a tube or closes off a bodily orifice 1. anal sphincter ​external anal sphincter internal anal sphincter hepatic sphincter esophageal sphincter lower esophageal sphincter upper esophagea...
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Ram's horn sign

The Ram's horn sign, also known as Shofar sign, is the tubular, conical appearance of the stomach antrum seen on a barium meal. The stomach is less distensible and the curved conical appearance resembles the horn of a ram. This is seen in granulomatous disease, typically Crohn disease, but also...
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Aerodigestive tract

The aerodigestive tract is a non-TA descriptive collective term for the respiratory tract and proximal portion of the digestive tract. As it is a non-standard term, its precise components vary somewhat with the context in which the term is being employed. Terminology Definitions of what precis...
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Van Assche index

The Van Assche index is a semiquantitative scoring system originally developed in 2003 to assess the severity and disease response in perianal fistulizing Crohn disease. In 2017 substantial changes were proposed to the original system, resulting in the modified Van Assche index. Both system rema...
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Abdominal paracentesis contraindications (mnemonic)

A mnemonic to remember the contraindications to abdominal paracentesis is: CAPSID Mnemonic C: coagulopathy (INR >2.0)  A: abdominal wall cellulitis P: pregnancy S: surgical abdomen (absolute contraindication) / severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count <50 x 103/μL) I: intra-abdominal adhes...
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Pediatric appendicitis score

The Pediatric Appendicitis Score (PAS) is a clinical decision rule and predictor of the likelihood of acute appendicitis in the pediatric population 1. Criteria cough/percussion/hopping tenderness in right lower quadrant (+2) anorexia (+1) fever (+1) nausea or emesis (+1) tenderness in rig...
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Acute pancreatitis severity criteria (mnemonic)

A mnemonic to remember the severity criteria for acute pancreatitis is: PANCREAS Mnemonic P: PAO2 <8 kpA A: age >55 years N: neutrophilia (WBC >15 x 109 / L) C: calcium <2 mmol/L R: renal (urea >16 mmol/L) E: enzymes (LDH >600 IU/L and AST >200 IU/L) A: albumin (serum) <32 g/L S: sugar...
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Small intestine diverticular disease

Small intestine diverticular disease is an uncommon form of diverticular disease and can be classified into disease affecting the: Meckel diverticulum Meckel diverticulitis non Meckel diverticular disease duodenum - duodenal diverticulosis duodenal diverticulitis jejunum and ileum - jejuno...
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Portal venous phase

The portal venous phase, also known as the late portal phase or hepatic phase, is a contrast-enhanced CT or MRI series that has the following characteristics: liver parenchyma is at its peak enhancement with a density >110 HU (an increase of at least 50 HU from the unenhanced baseline)1,2 port...
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Rosenbach sign (hemiplegia)

Rosenbach sign or phenomenon is a clinical sign described in hemiplegia.  The sign refers to the absence of an abdominal wall skin reflex when stroking the paralyzed side of a patient; conversely on the unaffected side, the reflex is normal 1. See also Rosenbach gave his name to two other cli...
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Obturator sign

Obturator sign is a clinical sign of acute appendicitis, it is defined as discomfort felt by the subject/patient on the slow internal movement of the hip joint, while the right knee is flexed. It indicates an inflamed pelvic appendix that is in contact with the obturator internus muscle 1-3. Se...
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Late arterial phase

The late arterial phase, also known as the corticomedullary phase or early venous portal phase, is a contrast-enhanced CT or MRI series, in which there is an optimal enhancement of structures that get their blood supply directly from the arterial system. The standard characteristics for this ph...
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Steelpan sign (sigmoid volvulus)

The steelpan sign refers to the close resemblance of sigmoid volvulus on CT to the percussion instrument known as the steelpan. The steelpan, also known as steel drum or pan, is a Caribbean musical instrument invented in Trinidad and Tobago by the mid-1930s, which became very popular in Trinidad...
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Hypervascular splenic lesions

Hypervascular splenic lesions are findings that enhance more or similarly to the background splenic parenchyma on late arterial phase, on contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. Vascular mycotic aneurysm Neoplastic splenic hemangioma 2 most common primary benign neoplasm of the spleen second most com...
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Split-wall sign (sigmoid volvulus)

The split-wall sign is one of the signs of sigmoid volvulus. This sign is characterized by the separation of the walls of a single loop of the sigmoid colon due to the invagination of mesenteric fat between them. The intervening fat causes the loop to appear bilobed or C-shaped on axial images, ...
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Boas sign

Boas sign is a clinical sign that is defined as hyperesthesia felt by the patient to light touch in the right lower scapular region or the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. It is classically seen in patients with acute cholecystitis. History and etymology Ismar Isidor Boas (1858–1938), was ...
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Carnett sign

The Carnett sign describes an examination finding used to distinguish pain arising from the abdominal wall from pain arising from within the abdomen itself. Eliciting the sign was described as a two-stage procedure. First the examiner locates the point of maximal tenderness through palpation of...
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Blumberg sign

Blumberg sign is defined as discomfort on the manual application of tension over the abdomen observed by simultaneously watching the subjects face. On the removal of the examiner's hand the patient should be again asked whether he or she is feeling pain or not. It is expressive of peritoneal irr...
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Rovsing sign

Rovsing sign is commonly used to describe pain elicited in the right iliac fossa on deep palpation of the left iliac fossa.  It is used in clinical examination to detect peritoneal irritation in the right iliac fossa, most frequently associated with acute appendicitis. Most teaching erroneously...
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Aaron sign

Aaron sign is a clinical sign that is defined as a feeling of distress and pain in the epigastric, umbilical and praecordial regions, on steady pressure over McBurney point, it is suggestive of chronic appendicitis. History and etymology Charles Dettie Aaron (1866–1951) was an American gastroe...
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Cullen sign

Cullen sign refers to superficial edema visible as periumbilical discolouration and is most commonly seen in patients with acute pancreatitis 1-3. Clinical presentation Clinically patients with pancreatitis present with epigastric pain that radiates to the umbilical/periumbilical region and th...
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Gastrointestinal bleeding

Gastrointestinal ​(GI) bleeding refers to hemorrhage into the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract; it is commonly clinically subdivided into whether it occurs into the upper (proximal) or lower (distal) GI tract: upper GI bleeding bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz, i.e. proximal to t...
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Splenic vein thrombosis

Splenic vein thrombosis (plural: thromboses) is an uncommon condition in which the splenic vein becomes thrombosed, that most frequently occurs in the context of pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer. Whilst, for the most part asymptomatic, splenic vein thrombosis increases risk of gastric varices a...
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Persistent descending mesocolon

Persistent descending mesocolon is defined as the failure of fusion of the mesentery of the descending colon with the lateral and posterior parietal peritoneum 1. Gross anatomy Persistent descending mesocolon is a rare congenital anomaly, in which the primitive dorsal mesocolon does not fuse w...
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Pediatric Appendicitis Risk Calculator

The Pediatric Appendicitis Risk Calculator (pARC) is a clinical decision rule and predictor of the likelihood of acute appendicitis in pediatric patients.  Due to the non-categorical data of some variables within the criteria, an integrated calculator is required to use this tool. Criteria 1,2 ...
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Z-track technique for paracentesis

The Z-track technique is used for paracentesis. It produces a non-linear track between the dermis and the peritoneum, and this serves to decrease the chance of ascitic fluid leakage through the track. Procedure Instead of directly sticking the access needle from the skin surface into the perit...
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Gastropericardial fistula

Gastropericardial fistulas are rare abnormal communications between the stomach and the pericardial sac. This is a life-threatening condition that can lead to impaired cardiac function, sepsis and eventually death. Clinical presentation Patients with gastropericardial fistula may present with ...
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Anterior resection of the rectum

Anterior resection is a surgical procedure to resect the rectum and sigmoid colon while preserving the anal sphincter complex. Indications cancer of the rectum (most commonly) severe diverticular disease Procedure Although historically an open procedure, most anterior resections are now per...
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CT chest abdomen-pelvis (protocol)

The CT chest-abdomen-pelvis protocol serves as an outline for an examination of the trunk covering the chest,  abdomen and pelvis. It is one of the most common CT examinations conducted in routine and emergencies. It can be combined with a CT angiogram. Note: This article aims to frame a genera...
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CT abdomen-pelvis (protocol)

The CT abdomen-pelvis protocol serves as an outline for an examination of the whole abdomen including the pelvis. It is one of the most common CT protocols for any clinical questions related to the abdomen and/or in routine and emergencies. It forms also an integral part of trauma and oncologic ...
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CT pancreas (protocol)

The CT pancreas protocol serves as an outline for a dedicated examination of the pancreas. As a separate examination, it is usually conducted as a biphasic contrast study and might be conducted as a part of other scans such as  CT abdomen-pelvis, CT chest-abdomen-pelvis. Note: This article aims...
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Rectal diverticulosis

Rectal diverticulosis (plural: diverticuloses) or the presence of diverticula in the rectum is very rare. Epidemiology Rectal diverticula are very rare with only scattered case reports in the global medical corpus, and symptomatic cases, e.g. rectal diverticulitis, are even rarer 1. It has bee...
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APPEND score

The APPEND score is a clinical decision rule and predictor of the likelihood of acute appendicitis. Criteria 1 male gender (1) anorexia (1) migratory pain (1) localized peritonism (1) elevated CRP > 15mg/L (1) neutrophilia >7.5x109/L (1) APPEND refers to the mnemonic: A: anorexia P: pa...
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Diaphragmatic lung hernia

A diaphragmatic lung hernia (plural: hernias or herniae) is extremely rare, characterized by a lung herniation through the diaphragm into the abdominal cavity. There has been a single case report 2. It is questionable whether this entity truly exists at all 3. This is not to be confused with th...
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Anusitis

Anusitis is inflammation of the anal canal lining. Terminology Anusitis should not be confused with proctitis, which is distinguished as inflammation of rectal mucosa. Epidemiology Anusitis is associated with diet, in particular excess intake of coffee, cola, beer, citrus, spices, and/or hot...
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Marginal artery (disambiguation)

The marginal artery may refer to several different arteries in the body, including two different coronary vessels: callosomarginal artery (CNS) marginal artery (of Drummond) obtuse marginal artery (cardiac) right marginal artery (cardiac)
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Viscera

The viscera (singular: viscus) refers to all the internal organs within the major cavities of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Therefore it does not include organs of the CNS, head and neck or musculoskeletal compartments nor does it encompass non-internal organs (e.g. the skin) 1. Splanchnology...
Article

Right hemicolectomy

A right hemicolectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the cecum and ascending colon. Indications cancer of the appendix, cecum or ascending colon (most common) 1 inflammatory bowel disease, particularly Crohn disease complicated appendicitis cecal volvulus perforation of the right colon ...
Article

O sign

The O sign is a radiographic sign described in gastric band slippage. Normally, a correctly-sited laparoscopic gastric band lies such that its anterior and posterior margins are superimposed in the anteroposterior orientation and a oblong morphology is visible on a frontal radiograph.  When a g...
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Acute non-traumatic abdominal pain in pregnancy

Acute non-traumatic abdominal pain in pregnancy requires a considered imaging approach due to the increased risks of fetal demise associated with undiagnosed diseases such as perforated acute appendicitis. Ultrasound is the first-line modality due to its wide availability and ability to diagnose...
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Abdominal pain in pregnancy protocol (MRI)

The abdominal pain in pregnancy MRI protocol encompasses a set of MRI sequences for assessment of causes of non-traumatic abdominal pain in pregnancy. Note: This article aims to frame a general concept of an MRI protocol for the assessment of the abdomen in pregnancy. Protocol specifics will va...
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Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas

Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma is a rare exocrine neoplasm that comprises ~1% of all pancreatic tumors. This tumor shows more aggressive behavior than the far more common adenocarcinoma 1,3,4. Clinical presentation High levels of serum lipase, due to hypersecretion syndrome, resulting in sub...
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Post-polypectomy coagulation syndrome

Post-polypectomy coagulation syndrome occurs during a colonoscopic polypectomy procedure when electrocoagulation injury causes a transmural burn to the colon without radiographic evidence of perforation 1,2.  Terminology  Post-polypectomy coagulation syndrome is also known as post-polypectomy ...
Article

Ingested foreign bodies in adults

Ingested foreign bodies in adults, in contrast to in children, is often accidental. It usually occurs accidentally in association with food consumption and is most common in adults with underlying gastrointestinal tract pathology. Cases of intentional foreign body ingestion in adults are seen mo...
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Lipoma of ileocecal valve

Lipomas of the ileocecal valve are a rarer entity than the more commonly occurring lipomatosis of the ileocecal valve. They can be differentiated from the latter as they have a demarcating capsule around the fatty tissue and are confined to only one of the ileocecal valve lips 1. Pathologically ...
Article

MEN1 triad (mnemonic)

Mnemonics to remember the classic triad of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) are: PPP PiParPanc ParaPanPit Mnemonics PPP P: pituitary adenoma: prolactinoma is commonest P: pancreatic endocrine tumors P: parathyroid proliferative disease parathyroid hyperplasia (most common) pa...

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