Radiopaedia Blog

Dr Frank Gaillard discusses giant perivascular spaces during our recent Adult Brain MRI Review Course. Late registrations to watch the full 6 hour course video close very soon! 

Adult Brain MRI Review Course - Online Video 

We will be accepting late registrations to watch the full 6 hour video recording from our Adult Brain MRI Review Course for the next few days only. All registrants receive a guaranteed 3 months video access and an official course certificate. Videos are presented in English with English captions. Because we are in the late registration period, it may take several days for video access to be granted after payment as manual processing by our staff is required. 

Currency

The $50 course fee is in Australian dollars which currently equates to around USD $35, EUR $32, CAD $47 and GBP £23 but you can find up to date currency conversions here.

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11th Sep 2015 22:01 UTC

Adrenoleukodystrophy

Symmetric occipitoparietal periventricular white matter disease with serpiginous, garland-shaped enhancement at the periphery. This appearance is pathognomic of adrenoleukodystrophy, an x-linked genetic disease.

This case features in our Adult Brain MRI Review Course. Late registrations to watch the full 6 hour course video are closing very soon! 

Adult Brain MRI Review Course - Online Video 

We will be accepting late registrations to watch the full 6 hour video recording from our Adult Brain MRI Review Course for the next few days only. All registrants receive a guaranteed 3 months video access and an official course certificate. Videos are presented in English with English captions. Because we are in the late registration period, it may take several days for video access to be granted after payment as manual processing by our staff is required. 

Currency

The $50 course fee is in Australian dollars which currently equates to around USD $35, EUR $32, CAD $47 and GBP £23 but you can find up to date currency conversions here.

Video Trailer

 
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Dr Frank Gaillard discusses intraventricular meningioma during our recent Adult Brain MRI Review Course. You can now purchase the full 6 hour course video on demand  

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The introduction of improved playlists earlier this year has been a superb advancement in functionality and user experience. Be it for organizing ones own cases, sharing with friends and colleagues, or teaching at institutional or national meetings.

At present playlists are neither searchable or indexed, but contributors will often notice that over time some of their cases have been included in other users' playlists. When viewing a case which is included in a playlist, you can navigate to that playlist. From there you may explore new cases and from them additional playlists, opening up a kaleidoscope of educational merriment.

It provides a proud individual moment, as well as a sense of satisfaction, when others are not only appreciating, but also in many cases using your cases to educate others across the globe.

Below are a selection of some of the awesome playlists that are emerging.

Playlists from our courses

Chest module from our Trauma course

This is one of the playlists that was used for the recent Radiopaedia.org trauma course by managing editor Andrew Dixon. view here

Each case is attributed clearly, so that everyone can see your contribution. Even better, all contributors whose cases are included in these courses are given complimentary access to the whole online course.

ANZSNR Neuroradiology series

Alternatively it may feature in national meeting presentations like the ANZSNR Neuroradiology series curated by Radiopaedia.org founder Frank Galliard. view here

CT brain for Emergency Physicians

Playlists can be very personal or very public. They may be long or succinct. The topic may be broad and targeted at the clinician community like this tidy playlist on CT Head for Emergency Physicians. view here

Collaborative projects

On the other hand they may be immensely focused, such as the list created to aid the radiopaedia.org team in the production of a collaborative poster for the 2014 RANZCR meeting entitled, "Wrong place, wrong time: Imaging and embryological features of congenital renal anomalies". view here

Personal collections

Playlists can also be dynamic, changing on a day to day basis, like some of my own collections for individual departments in my own little hospital (RIPAS) in Brunei. view here

Exam preparation

Finally in keeping with the spirit of both participation and educational contribution a plethora of playlists are out there to help others in exam preparation. This includes some superb sets from managing editor Jeremy Jones, like this pot pouri of pediatric MSK cases for the UK Royal College of Radiologists FRCR 2B examination. view here

Explore, enjoy, share and educate.

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Now that we have over 20,000 cases, it has become imperative that we are able to more easily find quality cases with confirmed diagnoses. To that end over the next week or two we are introducing a new component to all cases: Diagnostic Certainty (DC). 

This new user interface is located immediately below the title in case edit mode. 

There are 5 possible levels of diagnostic certainty 

  1. Possible
    • The preferred diagnosis is one of a number of possible diagnoses, and although it is perhaps more likely, other conditions remain viable alternatives. Cases like this are sometimes worthwhile, but often they are not. What you need to do: include a discussion on why you favor your diagnosis. Be prepared for your case to be rejected for publication. That's ok, you can always keep it as one of your unlisted cases.
  2. Probable
    • The preferred diagnosis is far more likely (>90%) than any alternative, but the diagnosis has not been established.
  3. Confirmed but unsubstantiated
    • You have reason to believe the diagnosis was confirmed, but you do not have access to the proof and cannot upload it. For example, you collected this case some time ago and have included "path proven" in the description but no actual histology report. Alternatively the referral states the diagnosis which was established elsewhere.
  4. Confirmed and substantiated
    • The diagnosis is known beyond a doubt and proof is included in this case. For example, histology report +/- slides are included, or confirmatory tests have been provided and those results included. Sometimes images are pathognomonic (e.g. fractures) and need no supportive evidence.
  5. Not applicable
    • The images are not of a patient with a particular diagnosis. For example, they may be a normal scan for teaching purposes, or alternatively a diagram or flow chart.

How diagnostic certainty is used on the site

The diagnostic certainty of a case has many implications and functions. 

Firstly it has a strong influence on case completeness, and therefore sorting search results by case completeness will favor cases with high DC. Similarly these cases will be more frequently shown in Quiz Mode. 

Secondly search results will show the DC state as a colored dot (matching the slider). 

Thirdly search results can be (soon) filtered to only show cases of a minimum DC (e.g. at least confirmed but unsubstantiated). 

 

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