Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

9,841 results found
Article

1.5T vs 3T

Comparing 1.5T vs 3T MRI systems identifies a number of differences: increased signal to noise ratio (SNR) increased spatial resolution increased temporal resolution increased specific absorption rate (SAR) increased acoustic noise Signal to noise ratio Theoretically, signal is proportion...
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14-3-3 protein

14-3-3 protein is found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and is currently used to help identify patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD).  In diagnosing sCJD, the sensitivity of 14-3-3 protein is 92% and the specificity is 80% 1. A negative 14-3-3 assay may be helpful in reducin...
Article

18q syndrome

18q syndrome is a rare chromosomal anomaly where there is deletion of part of the long arm of chromosome 18.  Associated symptoms and findings vary widely, as does their severity.  Characteristic features include short stature, mental retardation and hypotonia, facial and distal skeletal abnorma...
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1p19q codeletion

1p19q codeletion stands for the combined loss of the short arm chromosome 1 (“1p”) and the long arm of chromosome 19 (“19q”) and is recognised as genetic marker predictive of therapeutic response (both chemotherapy and combined chemoradiotherapy) and overall longer survival in patients with diff...
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2-hydroxyglutarate

2-hydroxyglutarate is a metabolite that accumulates in the brains of patients with IDH-1 mutated (IDH-1 positive) brain tumours, particularly diffuse low grade gliomas. Although not in widespread clinical use, it is likely that 2-hydroxyglutarate, which resonates at 2.25 ppm, will be able to be ...
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2005 WHO histological classification of odontogenic tumours

The 2005 WHO histological classification of odontogenic tumours lays out a classification system for neoplasms and other tumours related to the odontogenic apparatus. At the time of writing (2016) it is still the most widely used classification system.  Classification Malignant tumours odonto...
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2008 WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues

The 2008 WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues is at the time of writing (mid 2016) the most widely used classification system.   Classification Hodgkin lymphoma nodular lymphocyte predominance classical Hodgkin lymphoma nodular sclerosing mixed cellularity ...
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2011 revision of usual interstitial pneumonia pattern: diagnostic HRCT criteria

As a part of international evidence based guidelines adopted by collaborative effort of American Thoracic Society, the European Respiratory Society, the Japanese Respiratory Society and the Latin American Thoracic association,  specific diagnostic HRCT criteria for usual interstitial pneumonia (...
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2014 WHO classification of endometrial stromal tumours

Endometrial stromal tumours (EST) constitute <2% of all uterine tumours and <10% of uterine mesenchymal neoplasms 1.  Over the past four decades, EST classification has gone through various modifications starting from the earliest study by Norris and Taylor 2. This was primarily due to th...
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20° oblique projection

20° oblique projection is a troubleshooting projection used especially in young women and in follow up patients. Technique The C arm is turned approximately 20° for a superomedio-inferolateral obique. With the patients feet pointing towards the unit and her torso turned slightly outward with t...
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22q11.2 deletion syndrome

The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, also known as the DiGeorge syndrome or velocardiofacial syndrome, is a syndrome where a small portion of the chromosome 22 is lost and results in a variable but a recognisable pattern of physical and behavioural features. Epidemiology The estimated incidence is a...
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3D ultrasound

Three dimensional (3D) ultrasound is a technique that converts standard 2D grayscale ultrasound images into a volumetric data set. The 3D image can then be reviewed retrospectively. The technique was developed for problem solving (particularly in obstetric/gynecologic exams) and potentially to r...
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4D syndrome

4D syndrome is a term given to syndromic glucagonomas, a type of pancreatic endocrine tumour. D: dermatitis (necrolytic migratory erythema, often involving the groin) D: diabetes D: deep vein thrombosis D: depression
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5-F rule (mnemonic)

The 5-F rule refers to risk factors for the development of cholelithiasis in an event of upper abdominal pain: fair: more prevalent in Caucasian population 1 fat: BMI >30 female gender fertile: one or more children forty: age ≥40 cholelithiasis can occur in young patients with a positiv...
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5-tier ACR system of radiologic breast findings

The 5-tier ACR system was a previously used system for classification of radiologic breast findings, proposed by the American College of Radiologists (ACR). It is no longer in widespread use, having been gradually superseded by the new 6-tier BIRADS classification system first published in 1992....
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5th metacarpal pit

The 5th metacarpal pit refers to the normal exaggeration of the pit-like depression in the head of fifth metacarpal.  It should not be mistaken for a fracture (old or new) or an erosion.
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a vs. an

In English writing the indefinite article 'a' is used in congruence with a noun of which not a particular one is indicated as opposed to 'the'. For instance 'the house' is a particular house that can be identified, whereas 'a house' does not reference one house specifically. When the word follo...
Article

A-rings

A-rings are a type of distal oesophageal ring. They are above the B-ring and occur a few centimetres proximal to the gastro-oesophageal junction. They represent a physiological contraction of oesophageal smooth muscle covered by mucosa. A-rings are uncommonly symptomatic.
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Aarskog syndrome

Aarskog syndrome or Aarskog–Scott syndrome (also known as the facio-digito-genital syndrome) is a rare anomaly characterized by short stature in association with a variety of structural anomalies involving mainly the face, distal extremities, and external genitalia. Clinical presentation The m...
Article

Aase-Smith syndrome

Aase-Smith syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder. Clinical features congenital hypoplastic anaemia - fetal anaemia triphalangeal thumbs broad thumb abnormal clavicles cleft lip, cleft palate hypoplastic radii hydrocephalus (due to Dandy-Walker anomaly) joint contractures na...
Article

AAST injury scoring scales

The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) injury scoring scales are the most widely accepted and used system of classifying and categorising traumatic injuries. Injury grade reflects severity, guides management, and aids in prognosis. At the time of writing (mid 2016), 32 differe...
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AAST kidney injury scale

The AAST (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma) renal injury scale 3-4 is the most widely used renal trauma grading system at the time of writing (mid 2016). Severity is assessed according to the depth of renal parenchymal damage and involvement of the urinary collecting system and ren...
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AAST liver injury scale

The AAST (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma) liver injury scale 1994 revision is the most widely used grading system at the time of writing (mid 2016).  Classification grade I haematoma: subcapsular, <10% surface area laceration: capsular tear, <1 cm  parenchymal depth gr...
Article

AAST spleen injury scale

The 1994 revision of American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) splenic injury scale is the most widely used grading system for splenic trauma at the time of writing (mid 2016).  Classification grade I subcapsular haematoma <10% of surface area capsular laceration <1 cm dept...
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Abdomen: AP supine view

AP supine radiograph can be performed as a standalone projection or as part of an acute abdominal series, depending on the clinical question posed, local protocol and the availability of other imaging modalities. Patient position the patient is supine, lying on their back, either on the X-ray ...
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Abdomen: lateral decubitus view

The lateral decubitus abdominal radiograph is used to identify free intraperitoneal gas (pneumoperitoneum). It can be performed when the patient is unable to be transferred to, or other imaging modalities (e.g. CT) are not available. The most useful position for detecting free intraperitoneal ai...
Article

Abdomen: PA erect view

The PA erect abdominal radiograph is often obtained in conjunction with the AP supine abdominal view in the acute abdominal series of radiographs. When used together it is a valuable projection in assessing air fluid levels, and free air in the abdominal cavity. Patient position the patient is...
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Abdominal adhesions

Abdominal adhesions are bands of scar tissue (fibrous or fibrous fatty), most often occurring as a complication of previous abdominal surgery. Pathology Adhesions often occur with multiple abdominal operations or previous postoperative intra-abdominal complications history of intra-abdominal i...
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Abdominal and pelvic anatomy

Abdominal and pelvic anatomy encompasses the anatomy of all structures of the abdominal and pelvic cavities.
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Abdominal aorta

The abdominal aorta is the main blood vessel in the abdominal cavity that transmits oxygenated blood from the thoracic cavity to the organs within the abdomen and to the lower limbs. Gross anatomy It is a continuation of descending thoracic aorta at T12 posterior to the median arcuate ligament...
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Abdominal aortic aneurysm

Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are focal dilatations of the abdominal aorta that are 50% greater than the proximal normal segment or that are >3 cm in maximum diameter. Epidemiology Its prevalence increases with age. Males are much more commonly affected than females (with a male: female ...
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Abdominal aortic aneurysm (summary)

Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are focal dilatations of the abdominal aorta that are 50% greater than the proximal normal segment or that are >3 cm in maximum diameter. Summary epidemiology prevalence of rupture increases with age males more commonly affected than females almost 10% of...
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Abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is a feared complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm and is a surgical emergency. Epidemiology Abdominal aortic aneurysms are common and affect ~7.5% of patients aged over 65 years 6. Clinical presentation The classical triad of pain, hypotension and ...
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Abdominal aortic injury

Abdominal aortic injuries are very rare and are much less common than thoracic aortic injury.  Epidemiology Aortic injury occurs in <1% of blunt trauma patients, with abdominal aortic injury representing only ~5% of all aortic injuries 1. Males are more frequently injured, with the median a...
Article

Abdominal cavity

The abdominal cavity is divided into two major compartments, the peritoneum and retroperitoneum, early in fetal development. The parietal peritoneum is reflected over the peritoneal organs to form a series of supporting peritoneal ligaments, mesenteries and omenta. The peritoneal reflections ca...
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Abdominal ectopic pregnancy

Abdominal ectopic pregnancies are an extremely rare type of ectopic pregnancy. Epidemiology They are thought to represent ~1% of all ectopic pregnancies 6 with an estimated incidence of 1:1000-10,000 births. Pathology It is often thought that they most frequently result from a tubal rupture ...
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Abdominal hernia

Abdominal herniations may be congenital or acquired and come with varying eponyms. They are distinguished primarily based on location and content. 75-80% of all hernias occur in the inguinal region. Content of the hernia is variable, and may include: small bowel loops mobile colon segments (s...
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Abdominal opacities

An opacity projecting over the abdomen has a broad differential. Possibilities to consider include foreign bodies ingested, e.g. coins, batteries, bones, etc artifacts, e.g. object attached to the cloth of the patient like a safety pin or button iatrogenic, e.g. haemostatic clips, gastric ba...
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Abdominal organ echogenicity (mnemonic)

This mnemonic helps to remember the relative echogenicity of abdominal organs on ultrasound: Darling Parents So Love Kids Mnemonic From most to least echogenic: D: diaphragm P: pancreas S: spleen L: liver K: kidneys(cortex)
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Abdominal paracentesis

Abdominal paracentesis, more commonly referred to as an ascitic tap, is a procedure that can be performed to collect peritoneal fluid for analysis or as a therapeutic intervention. Indications diagnostic: especially for newly diagnosed ascites determine aetiology of ascites assess for bacter...
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Abdominal radiograph (AP supine view: neonatal)

AP supine radiograph for neonates is performed as a mobile examination on the neonatal unit. It can be performed as a standalone projection or as part of a series including a left lateral decubitus x-ray in cases of suspected perforation.  Patient position patient is supine, lying on their bac...
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Abdominal radiograph (lateral view)

The lateral view abdominal radiograph is a useful problem-solving view that can complement frontal views of the abdomen. It is different than the lateral decubitus view of the abdomen and looks more like a lateral lumbar spine view. Patient position the patient may be either erect or recumbent...
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Abdominal radiography

Abdominal radiography can be useful in many settings. Before the advent of computerised tomography (CT) imaging, it was a primary means of investigating gastrointestinal pathology (and often allowed indirect evaluation of other abdominal viscera). Indications Although abdominal radiography has...
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Abdominal surface anatomy

The abdomen, when looking from in front, is divided into nine regions by imaginary planes (two vertical and two horizontal) forming abdominal surface anatomy. The nine regions are of clinical importance when examining and describing pathologies related to the abdomen. The horizontal planes are o...
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Abdominoschisis

Abdominoschisis refers to a split or in the abdominal wall. Some authors use the term synonymously with a gastroschisis. When the defect continues into the thoracic region it is termed a thoraco-abdominoschisis. A large abdominoschisis is considered part of the limb body wall complex 2. See als...
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Abducens nerve

The abducens nerve is the sixth cranial nerve. It courses from its nucleus located in the dorsal pons to its innervation of the lateral rectus muscle and can be divided into four parts: nucleus and intraparenchymal portion cisternal portion cavernous sinus portion orbital portion Gross anat...
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Abductor digiti minimi

The abductor digiti minimi muscle overlies the opponens digiti minimi. Summary origin: pisiform, the pisohamate ligament, and tendon of flexor carpi ulnaris insertion: 5th proximal phalanx action: abducts 5th finger at metacarpophalangeal joint arterial supply: ulnar artery innervation: de...
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Abductor digiti minimi muscle

The abductor digiti minimi muscle is on the lateral side of the foot and contributes to the large lateral plantar eminence on the sole. Summary origin: lateral and medial processes of calcaneal tuberosity, and band of connective tissue connecting calcaneus with base of metatarsal V insertion:...
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Abductor hallucis muscle

The abductor hallucis muscle forms the medial margin of the foot and contributes to a soft tissue bulge on the medial side of the sole. Summary origin: medial process of calcaneal tuberosity insertion: medial side of base of proximal phlanx of great toe action: abducts and flexes great toe a...
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Abductor pollicis brevis

The abductor pollicis brevis is a thin subcutaneous muscle laterally placed in the thenar eminence of the hand. origin: mainly from the flexor retinaculum, few fibres origin from the tubercles of scaphoid and trapezium and tendon of abductor pollicis longus. Accessory slips may spring from the ...
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Abductor pollicis longus

The abductor pollicis longus (APL) is a muscle found in the deep posterior compartment of the forearm. As it descends, it becomes superficial and passes under the extensor retinaculum and through the 1st extensor compartment of the wrist before attaching distally. Summary origin: posterior sur...
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ABER position

The ABER position is related to imaging of the shoulder joint and is a mnemonic for ABduction and External Rotation. In this position, labral tears are conspicuous by tightening the inferior glenohumeral labroligamentous complex (which are also the most important glenohumeral ligaments in preve...
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Abernethy malformation

Abernethy malformations are rare vascular anomalies of the splanchnic venous system. They comprise of congenital portosystemic shunts and result from persistence of the embryonic vessels.  Epidemiology Type I malformations are thought only to occur in females with type II having a male predile...
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Aberrant arachnoid granulations

Aberrant arachnoid granulations (AbAG) are arachnoid granulations that penetrated the dura but failed to migrate normally in the venous sinus. They are most often located in the greater wing of the sphenoid bone. Occasionally, they are seen at the posterior temporal bone wall. Clinical presenta...
Article

Aberrant internal carotid artery

An aberrant internal carotid artery is a variant of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and represents a collateral pathway resulting from involution of the normal cervical portion (first embryonic segment) of the ICA 5. There is consequent enlargement of the usually small collaterals which cours...
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Aberrant left pulmonary artery

Aberrant left pulmonary artery, also known as pulmonary sling, represents an anatomical variant characterised by the left pulmonary artery arising from the right pulmonary artery and passing above the right main bronchus and in between the trachea and oesophagus to reach the left lung. It may le...
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Aberrant right subclavian artery

Aberrant right subclavian arteries (ARSA), also known as arteria lusoria, are the commonest of the aortic arch anomalies 2.  Epidemiology The estimated incidence is 0.5-2%. Clinical presentation They are often asymptomatic, but around 10% of people may complain of tracheo-oesophageal symptom...
Article

Aberrations in the normal development and involution of the breast

Aberrations in the Normal Development and Involution of the breast (ANDI) is an all encompassing term that is used to describe a wide spectrum of the benign breast diseases. As the name suggests, it is based on the theory that most of the encountered benign breast disorders are essentially minor...
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Abnormal bowel wall attenuation patterns

Abnormal bowel wall attenuation patterns on CT scan can be grouped under five categories: white enhancement gray enhancement water halo sign fat halo sign black attenuation The first three patterns are seen on contrast studies. White enhancement It is defined as uniform enhancement of th...
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Abnormal collection of barium anywhere (mnemonic)

A mnemonic used for abnormal collection of barium anywhere in the body : FEDUP Mnemonic F: fistula E: extravasation D: diverticulum U: ulcer P: perforation
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Abnormal ductus venosus waveforms

Abnormal ductus venosus waveforms can arise in a number of conditions ranging from aneuploidy to vascular malformations and fetal tumours.  Pathology Abnormal waveforms in fetal ductus venosus flow assessment can occur in a number of situations: aneuploidic anomalies Down syndrome: around 80...
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Abnormal intra-abdominal gas

Abnormal intra-abdominal gas may be seen on a chest or abdominal radiograph, or CT or MRI. pneumoperitoneum retropneumoperitoneum pseudopneumoperitoneum abnormally located bowel, e.g. Chilaiditi syndrome (bowel interposed between liver and hemidiaphragm), inguinal hernia intramural gas abs...
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Abnormal renal rotation

Abnormal renal rotation (renal malrotation) refers to an anatomical variation in the position of the kidneys, in particular to anomalous orientation of the renal hilum. It may occur unilaterally or bilaterally. It is almost always an asymptomatic incidental finding.  Epidemiology Malrotation i...
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Abnormally eccentric gestational sac

An eccentrically located gestational sac towards the fundus of uterus is the normal sonographic appearance; however an abnormally eccentric gestational sac on ultrasound may be apparent due to a number of causes They include interstitial ectopic pregnancy 1 normally implanted pregnancy in a  ...
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Abnormally low sac position

An abnormally low sac position can result from several possibilities which include impending / ongoing miscarriage cervical ectopic pregnancy fundal fibroid or other mass compressing the sac downward
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Abnormally thickened endometrium: differential diagnosis

Abnormally thickened endometrium on imaging may occur for a number of reasons which may be categorised based on whether or not they are related to pregnancy. Aetiologies may also be classified based on whether the patient is premenopausal or postmenopausal. Differential diagnosis Pregnancy rel...
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ABR certifying exam

The ABR certifying exam is the second of two exams necessary for certification in diagnostic and interventional radiology in the United States of America (the first is the core exam). It is taken 15 months after the end of the PGY 5 year (or three months after a one year PGY 6 fellowship). The ...
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ABR core exam

The ABR core exam is the first of two exams necessary for certification in diagnostic and interventional radiology in the United States of America. It is taken at the end of the PGY 4 year of radiology residency training. The exam is computer-based and occurs in two sessions (7.5 hours and 6 ho...
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Abscess

Abscesses are focal confined collections of suppurative inflammatory material and can be thought of as having three components 1: central core comprised of necrotic inflammatory cells and local tissue peripheral halo of viable neutrophils surrounded by a 'capsule' with dilated blood vessels a...
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Absent bow tie sign

The absent bow tie sign represents the loss of the normal appearance of the menisci on parasagittal MRI images, and is suggestive of meniscal injury. Normally the medal and lateral menisci appear as low signal bow-tie-shaped structures between the femoral condyles and tibial plateaux. As the no...
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Absent ductus venosus

Agenesis of the ductus venosus (ADV) is a rare fetal vascular anomaly. According to the data obtained from the screening tests performed at 11-14 weeks of pregnancy, its incidence is reported to be 1/2500 (12). Pathology In the literature review on ductus venosus agenesis, Acherman et.al (13) ...
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Absent infrarenal inferior vena cava

An absent infrarenal inferior vena cava (IVC) can be congenital due to failure of development of the posterior cardinal and supracardinal veins, or acquired as result of intrauterine or perinatal inferior vena cava thrombosis. Epidemiology It is an extremely rare anomaly. Clinical presentatio...
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Absent nasal bone

In fetal sonographic assessment, an absent nasal bone is a feature which can sometimes be used as an adjunctive marker for fetal aneuploidy. Radiographic assessment Antenatal ultrasound It is assessed on a midline sagittal view. In this section the nasal bone is often seen as a bright echogen...
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Absent patella

An absent patella is a rare finding and can be found with an equally rare set of associations: surgical removal of patella (patellectomy) nail patella syndrome 2 popliteal pterygium syndrome proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) Meier-Gorlin syndrome 3
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Absent septum pellucidum

An absent septum pellucidum may rarely be an isolated finding, or more commonly be seen in association with a variety of conditions. Epidemiology The septum pellucidum is partly or entirely absent in 2 or 3 individuals per 100,000 in the general population.  Pathology An absent septum pelluc...
Article

Absent thumb

An absent thumb can have many associations. They include: Fanconi anaemia (pancytopenia-dysmelia syndrome) Franceschetti syndrome Holt-Oram syndrome phocomelia (e.g. thalidomide embryopathy) Poland syndrome (pectoral muscle aplasia and syndactyly) Rothmund-Thomson syndrome Seckel syndrome...
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Absent umbilical arterial end diastolic flow

Absent end diastolic flow (AEDF) in an umbilical artery Doppler assessment is a useful feature which indicates underlying fetal vascular stress if detected in mid or late pregnancy. It is often classified as Class II in severity in abnormal umbilical arterial Dopplers 9. Pathology The presence...
Article

Absent yolk sac

Absence of the yolk sac in the presence of an embryo on a transvaginal ultrasound is considered abnormal, and in general is associated with subsequent embryonic death. See also yolk sac
Article

Absorbed dose

Absorbed dose is a measure of the energy deposited in a medium by ionizing radiation. It is equal to the energy deposited per unit mass of medium, and so has the unit J/kg or gray (Gy) where 1Gy = 1Jkg-1. The absorbed dose is not a good indicator of the likely biological effect. 1 Gy of alpha r...
Article

AC-PC line

The anterior commissure (AC) - posterior commissure (PC) line, also referred as the bicommissural line, has been adopted as a convenient standard by the neuroimaging community, and in most instances is the reference plane for axial imaging in everyday scanning. The creation of a standard image p...
Article

Acardiac twin

Acardiac twins (or recipient twins) are haemodynamically disadvantaged non-viable twins that undergo secondary atrophy in association with a twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence. Epidemiology Acardiac twinning is thought to affect 1 in 100 monozygotic twin pregnancies and 1 in 35,000 preg...
Article

Accepted abbreviations

There are a number of accepted abbreviations that we use on Radiopaedia.org. We would like the site to be as standardised as possible and we have therefore chosen our accepted abbreviations and would ask that where possible these are used: e.g. not eg./e.g/eg (short for "exempli gratia&quo...
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Accessory appendicular artery

The accessory appendicular artery (or artery of Seshachalam) or is a branch of the posterior caecal artery, which in turn arises from the ileocolic artery, and runs in the mesoappendix. The exact prevalence of this accessory artery and its impact upon the risk of appendicitis varies among studi...
Article

Accessory breast tissue

Accessory breast tissue is a relatively common congenital condition in which abnormal accessory breast tissue is seen in addition to the presence of normal breast tissue. This normal variant can present as a mass anywhere along the course of the embryologic mammary streak (axilla to the inguinal...
Article

Accessory fissures of the lung

Accessory fissures of the lung usually occur at the borders of bronchopulmonary segments. They are common normal variants but are less commonly seen on imaging.  Some of the more common accessory fissure include 1: azygos fissure: most commonly seen accessory fissure inferior accessory fissur...
Article

Accessory gallbladder

Accessory gallbladders are a rare anatomical variant occurring in 0.03% of cases (approximately 1 in 3000 people). They can arise from either the left or right hepatic ducts or both. Accessory gallbladders arise from a bifid diverticulum of the hepatic duct in the 5th or 6th week of development ...
Article

Accessory hemiazygos vein

The accessory (or superior) hemiazygos vein forms part of the azygos system and along with the hemiazygos vein, it is partially analogous to the right-sided azygos vein. It drains the left superior hemithorax.  Gross anatomy Origin and course The accessory hemiazygos vein is formed by the con...
Article

Accessory left atrial appendage

An accessory left atrial appendage is a frequent fortuitous finding in cardiac imaging, encountered in ~10% of patients. They are more often seen as a small diverticular structure projecting from the right upper side of the left atrial wall. Differential diagnosis it must not be confused with ...
Article

Accessory middle cerebral artery

The accessory middle cerebral artery is a variant of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) that arises from the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). It is different from a duplicated middle cerebral artery, in which the duplicated vessel originates also from the distal end of the internal carotid artery (...
Article

Accessory navicular syndrome

Accessory navicular syndrome occurs when a type II accessory navicular (or "os tibiale externum") becomes painful due to movement across the pseudojoint between the ossicle and the navicular bone. The syndrome presents on MRI with bone marrow oedema signal (hypointense T1, hyperintens...
Article

Accessory occipital bone sutures

The parietal and occipital bones in particular are common regions for accessory sutures because of their multiple ossification centres. The occipital bone has complex development, ossifying from six centres. The foramen magnum is surrounded by four ossification centres. On each side are the exo...
Article

Accessory ossicle of the anterior arch of the atlas

The accessory ossicle of the anterior arch of the atlas is a normal variant and is best appreciated on a lateral cervical/sagittal study. It is observed as a circular and corticated osseous density that articulates with the inferior aspect of the anterior arch of the atlas.  It is not associate...
Article

Accessory ossicles

Accessory ossicles are secondary ossification centres that are separate from the adjacent bone. In most cases, they are congenital in origin, although they may occur as a result of trauma or local degenerative disease 2: shoulder & elbow os acromiale os supratrochleare dorsale wrist (mne...

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