Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

12,345 results found
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Vascular pathology

Vascular pathologies are common and include: arteriosclerosis hypertension fibromuscular dysplasia inherited disorders of the vessel wall aneurysms dissection thromboembolism vasculitis vasospasm vascular trauma intimal hyperplasia tumors of blood vessels congenital vascular anomali...
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Vascular pedicle

Vascular pedicle is bordered on the right by venous structures (right brachiocephalic vein above and superior vena cava) and on the left by an arterial structure (the left subclavian artery origin). The azygos vein (black oval) is seen en face above the right main bronchus. The vascular pedicle...
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Vascular rings and slings

Vascular rings and slings refer to the congenital vascular encirclement of the esophagus and/or trachea by anomalous/aberrant vessels.  Epidemiology Vascular rings are rare, occurring in <1% of patients 1. No gender or ethnic predispositions have been identified 3.  Clinical presentation Man...
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Vascular syndromes

The are numerous vascular syndromes that can occur in the body. There include Syndromes principally involving the vascular system Budd-Chiari syndrome celiac artery compression syndrome hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome) hypothenar hammer syndrome Kasabach-M...
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Vascular trauma

Great vessels thoracic aortic injury Solid organ renal pedicle injury
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Vasculitis

Vasculitis describes generalised inflammation of vessels. Vasculitides carry a broad range of clinical presentations and as a whole can involve almost any organ system. Pathology Some vasculitides are due to direct vessel injury from an infectious agent. However a large proportion show evidenc...
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Vasculopathies caused by varicella zoster virus

Vasculopathies caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV) represent a group of illnesses involving both small and large CNS arteries caused by a inflammatory process involving the media and the vascular endothelium. Usually it occurs in immunocompromised individuals due the viral reactivation and sp...
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Vasitis

Vasitis is an uncommon inflammatory disorder of the vas deferens and spermatic cord. It is classified as either the generally asymptomatic vasitis nodosa (seen after vasectomy) or acutely painful infectious vasitis. This article refers to the acute infective form as imaging is usually not undert...
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Vasogenic cerebral edema

Vasogenic cerebral edema refers to a type of cerebral edema in which the blood brain barrier (BBB) is disrupted (cf. cytotoxic cerebral edema, where the BBB is intact). It is an extracellular edema which mainly affects the white matter via leakage of fluid from capillaries. It is most frequentl...
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Vastus intermedius muscle

The vastus intermedius muscle is one of the 4 quadriceps muscles in the anterior compartment of the thigh. The others are the vastus medialis, the vests laterals, and the rectus femoris. Summary origin: upper two thirds of the anterior and lateral surfaces of the femur insertion quadriceps t...
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Vastus lateralis muscle

The vastus lateralis is largest of the four quadriceps muscles in the anterior compartment of the thigh. The others are the rectus femoris, the vastus intermedius, and the vastus medialis. Summary origin femur lateral part of intertrochanteric line margin of greater trochanter lateral mar...
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Vastus medialis muscle

The vastus medialis muscle is one of the four quadriceps muscles in the anterior compartment of the thigh. The others are the rectus femoris, the vastus intermedius, and the vastus lateralis. Summary origin femur medial part of intertrochanteric line pectineal line medial lip of the linea ...
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VATER

VATER (equivalent to VACTERL) is the non-random constellation of a number of congenital anomalies. V: vertebral anomalies A: anal atresia TE: tracheo-oesophageal fistulas R: radial ray hypoplasia, polydactyly and renal agenesis Epidemiology The prevalence of at least 3/5 anomalies occurs...
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Vegetable and plant inspired signs

There are many signs in radiology which are vegetable- and plant-inspired, they include: Unprocessed produce celery stalk anterior cruciate ligament: ACL mucoid degeneration celery stalk metaphysis: osteopathia striata and congenital rubella infection Christmas tree intestinal atresia cocon...
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Veiled right kidney sign

The veiled right kidney sign is a sonographic sign described in pneumoretroperitoneum, most commonly due to duodenal perforation. It refers to the appearance of the right kidney on transabdominal ultrasound 1-4. On ultrasound, there is difficulty in obtaining images of the right kidney due to i...
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Vein of Galen

The vein of Galen, also known as the great cerebral vein or great vein of Galen, is a short trunk formed by the union of the two internal cerebral veins and basal veins of Rosenthal. It lies in the quadrigeminal cistern. It curves backward and upward around the posterior border of the splenium o...
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Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation

Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations (VGAMs), probably better termed as median prosencephalic arteriovenous fistulas, are uncommon intracranial anomalies that tend to present dramatically during early childhood with features of a left-to-right shunt and high-output cardiac failure. Epidemiolo...
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Vein of Labbé

The vein of Labbé, also known as inferior anastomotic vein, is part of the superficial venous system of the brain.  The vein of Labbé is the largest channel that crosses the temporal lobe between the Sylvian fissure and the transverse sinus and connects the superficial middle cerebral vein to t...
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Vein of Marshall

The vein of Marshall, oblique vein of Marshall or the oblique vein of the left atrium is a small vein that descends on and drains the posterior wall of the left atrium. It drains directly into the coronary sinus at the same end as the great cardiac vein, marking the origin of the sinus. It repr...
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Veins of Sappey

Veins of Sappey are small veins around the falciform ligament that drain the venous blood from the anterior part of the abdominal wall directly into the liver. This flow dilutes the portal perfusion at these sites, causing hepatic pseudolesions. Gross anatomy The superior vein of Sappey drains...
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Velamentous cord insertion

Velamentous cord insertion is one of the types of abnormal umbilical cord insertion into the placenta. Epidemiology The estimated incidence is ~1% in singleton and 9-15% in twin pregnancies, respectively 11. It is also more common in placenta previa than in normally located placentas. The prev...
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Velum interpositum

The velum interpositum is a small membrane containing a potential space just above and anterior to the pineal gland which can become enlarged to form a cavum velum interpositum.  Gross anatomy The velum interpositum is formed by an invagination of pia mater forming a triangular membrane the ap...
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Vena caval foramen

The vena caval foramen is one of the three major apertures in the diaphragm. It is the highest of the three and situated at the level of T8-9. It is quadrilateral and placed at the junction of the right and middle leaflets of the central tendon. It transmits several structures between the thora...
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Venae cordis minimae

The venae cordis minimae (smallest cardiac veins or thebesian veins) are a small group of valveless myocardial coronary veins within the walls of each of the 4 cardiac chambers that drain venous blood directly into each of the respective chambers. They are most frequent in the right atrium and t...
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Venetian blind artifact (uterus)

The Venetian blind artifact (shadows) is a sonographic finding that is typically associated with adenomyosis but can also occur in uterine fibroids. The Venetian-blind artifact associated with adenomyosis is typically "thin" whereas when associated with uterine fibroids, there are also edge shad...
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Venous distension sign

The venous distension sign is a finding that may be identified on sagittal imaging of the dural venous sinuses which is said to have a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 94% for intracranial hypotension. The sign is positive when there is a convex inferior margin of the midportion of the...
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Venous drainage of the thoracic wall

The venous drainage of the thoracic wall drains deoxygenated venous blood from the peripheries of the thoracic cage back into systemic circulation. Gross anatomy Anterior thoracic wall Anterior intercostal veins The anterior intercostal veins originate from the intercostal space just inferio...
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Venous intravasation

Venous intravasation is the unintended introduction of radiographic contrast material into the local venous system. It is a well-recognised phenomenon during retrograde urethrogram 1,2 and hysterosalpingogram (HSG) studies, although can occur with other invasive procedures in the vicinity of ven...
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Venous thromboembolism

Venous thromboembolism covers a wide spectrum of diseases. Individual conditions and complicating condition include: deep vein thrombosis (DVT) pulmonary embolism (PE) dural venous sinus thrombosis Lemierre's syndrome tumor thrombus
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Venous vascular malformation of the facial nerve

Venous vascular malformations of the facial nerve, previously known as facial nerve hemangiomas, are rare benign vascular malformations of the facial nerve usually presenting as a facial nerve palsy, which can be rapid onset mimicking a Bell palsy.  Terminology As they do not appear to have cl...
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Ventilator associated pneumonia

Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a form of hospital acquired pneumonia (considered the commonest form 3). It is sometimes defined as as a pneumonia occurring more than 48 hours after patients have been intubated and received mechanical ventilation 5. It is usually suspected when the pa...
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Ventral cord herniation

Ventral cord herniation, also known by a variety of other terms such as spontaneous thoracic cord herniation or idiopathic spinal cord herniation, is a rare cause of focal myelopathy due to herniation of the thoracic cord through a dural defect.  Post surgical cord herniation can occur at any l...
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Ventral cord syndrome

Ventral cord syndrome (also known as anterior cord syndrome) is one of the incomplete cord syndromes and affects the anterior parts of the cord resulting in a pattern of neurological dysfunction dominated by motor paralysis and loss of pain, temperature and autonomic function. Anterior spinal ar...
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Ventral horn

The ventral horn of the spinal cord is one of the grey longitudinal columns found within the spinal cord. It contains the cell bodies of the lower motor neurones which have axons leaving via the ventral spinal roots on their way to innervate muscle fibers. Gross anatomy On transverse section o...
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Ventricular interdependence

Ventricular interdependence (or ventricular coupling) is a phenomenon whereby the function of one ventricle is altered by changes in the filling of the other ventricle. This leads to increase in volume of one ventricle associated with a decreased volume in the opposite ventricle 1. This conditi...
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Ventricular septal defect

Ventricular septal defects (VSD) represent defects in the interventricular septum that allow a haemodynamic communication between the right and left ventricles. It typically results in a left-to-right shunt. Epidemiology They represent one of the most common congenital cardiac anomalies and ma...
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Ventricular system

The ventricular system in the brain is composed of CSF-filled ventricles and their connecting foraminae. CSF is produced by ependymal cells which line the ventricles. They are continuous with the central canal. Ventricles contain around 1/5 of normal adult CSF volume, which is around 20-25 ml. ...
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Ventriculitis

Ventriculitis refers to inflammation, usually due to infection, of the ependymal lining of the cerebral ventricles. It is most often due to intraventricular rupture of brain abscess. Epidemiology Its epidemiology is varied and depends on the underlying cause.  meningitis (both pyogenic and vi...
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Ventriculoatrial shunt

Ventriculoatrial shunting is an alternative option for the diversion of CSF and relief of hydrocephalus. In this technique, the distal catheter is placed in the right atrium or even in the superior vena cava 1,2.  It is not the only alternative for the traditional ventriculoperitoneal shunt, an...
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Ventriculogallbladder shunt

Ventriculogallbladder shunts are a rare form of cerebrospinal fluid diversion, used when a ventriculoperitoneal shunt is not possible (e.g. intra-abdominal adhesions, peritonitis). Differential diagnosis a ventriculoperitoneal shunt in a right upper quadrant CSFoma See also ventriculoperiton...
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Ventriculomegaly

Ventriculomegaly is defined as enlargement of the ventricles. Simply, there are two causes: hydrocephalus communicating non-communicating parenchymal atrophy Refer to the article on hydrocephalus vs atrophy for more details on how to differentiate both entities. 
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Ventriculoperitoneal shunt

Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts are a device used to shunt cerebrospinal fluid in the treatment of hydrocephalus. As the name suggests, a catheter is placed with its tip in the ventricle. The external portion of the catheter is connected to a valve that regulates the flow of CSF based on a pre...
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Ventriculopleural shunt

Ventriculopleural shunting is an alternative option for the diversion of CSF and relief of hydrocephalus. In this technique, the distal catheter is placed in the pleural space. It is an alternative to a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (often considered a next most used alternative). Complications s...
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Ventriculus terminalis

The ventriculus terminalis or terminal ventricle of Krause, also known as the 5th ventricle, is an ependymal-lined fusiform dilatation of the terminal central canal of the spinal cord, positioned at the transition from the tip of the conus medullaris to the origin of the filum terminale.  It re...
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Venus necklace

A Venus necklace is a term almost never used, but for the sake of completeness is included here. It is used by some authors 1 to describe a series of T2 hyperintense lesions on the inferior surface of the corpus callosum in the midline (callososeptal interface), most frequently seen in multiple ...
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Vermian lobulation

Evaluation of vermian lobulation is essential in assessment of the vermian maturity. MRI is a useful tool in assessment of the fetal posterior fossa. Normal Vermian lobulation by weeks 1: By 21 weeks - Prepyramidal fissure can be seen between the tuber and pyramis. 21 to 22 weeks - Preculmina...
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Vermian maturity assessment (approach)

Radiological evaluation of the posterior fossa is an essential part of the routine fetal assessment, including vermian maturity assessment. Radiographic features Ultrasonography is a readily available diagnostic tool in the assessment of the fetal posterior fossa but is sometimes limited due t...
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Vermis

Gross anatomy The vermis (pl: vermes) of the cerebellum is an unpaired medial structure which separates the cerebellar hemispheres. The neocerebellar posterior lobes join in the midline behind the primary fissure to separate the vermis into superior and inferior portions. The vermis can be furt...
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Vernet syndrome

Vernet syndrome (also known as the jugular foramen syndrome) is a constellation of cranial nerve palsies due to compression from a jugular foramen lesion such as a glomus jugulare tumor or schwannoma. It consists of motor paralysis of: glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) vagus nerve (CN X) accesso...
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Verocay bodies

Verocay bodies are a histological feature of schwannomas and represent a particular growth pattern of Antoni type A pattern in which tumor cells form alternating parallel rows of nuclear palisades separated by regions of acellularity 1. 
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Vertebra

The vertebra (plural: vertebrae) is the fundamental segmental unit of the vertebral column (also know as the spine). Gross anatomy Vertebrae, apart from those that are atypical, have a similar basic structure which can be described as an anterior vertebral body and a posterior neural (or verte...
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Vertebral anomalies

The vertebral column is affected by a range of anatomical variants of the body and/or neural arch as well as accessory ossicles. Knowledge of basic vertebral anatomy and ossification is essential for describing and understanding the range of anomalies. Variant anatomy Vertebral body hemiverte...
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Vertebral artery

The vertebral arteries (VA) are paired arteries, each arising from the respective subclavian artery and ascending in the neck to supply the posterior fossa and occipital lobes, as well as provide segmental vertebral and spinal column blood supply. Summary origin: branches off the 1st part of t...
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Vertebral artery dissection

Vertebral artery dissection, like arterial dissection elsewhere, is a result of blood entering the media through a tear in the intima. It is potentially lethal and can be difficult to diagnose clinically and radiologically. Epidemiology Vertebral artery dissections have an incidence of 1-5 per...
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Vertebral artery ectasia

Vertebral artery ectasia refers to an abnormal dilatation of the vertebral artery. It is also known as a dolichoarterial loop (of Danziger). Clinical presentation Symptoms occur due to radicular compression or pathologic fracture (rare) from extensive bone erosion. Generally, patients present ...
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Vertebral artery loop formation

Vertebral artery loop formations occur when a portion of the vertebral artery contains an unusual coil. It can be a rare anatomical variant or can be acquired. Epidemiology Vertebral artery loops tend to be mostly diagnosed in the 5th and 6th decades. Its prevalence is uncertain but is thought...
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Vertebral artery thrombosis

Vertebral artery thrombosis results in complete or partial occlusion of the vertebral artery and alteration of blood flow to the posterior cerebral circulation. Ischemia or infarction to structures supplied by these arteries may result in a range of symptoms. brainstem cerebellum occipital lo...
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Vertebral body mass

The differential diagnosis for a vertebral body mass is broad and may range from a completely benign, sclerotic enostosis (bone island) to a malignant primary bone tumor. Classification Broadly, these lesions can be separated into: non-neoplastic lesions primary bone tumors secondary metast...
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Vertebral body squaring (differential)

Vertebral body squaring refers to the loss of normal concavity of the anterior border. It is seen in a variety of conditions including:  Differential diagnosis Ankylosing spondylitis Ankylosing spondylitis is the most common cause of vertebral body squaring. It usually involves multiple level...
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Vertebral hemangioma

Vertebral hemangiomas are the most common benign vertebral neoplasms. They are usually asymptomatic and incidentally detected due to their characteristic features on imaging for other reasons. Rarely, they can be locally aggressive (see: aggressive vertebral hemangioma). Please refer on the art...
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Vertebral lesion (differential)

Differential diagnosis of vertebral lesions includes:  Lesion originating in vertebral body  intraosseous hemangioma metastases Paget disease multiple myeloma Osteonecrosis vertebral body osteomyelitis lymphoma plasmacytoma giant cell tumor Langerhans cell histiocytosis fibrous dyspl...
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Vertebral levels (anatomical landmarks)

Many vertebral levels are associated with key anatomical landmarks. Below is a summary of vertebral levels and associated internal or surface anatomy. Vertebral Level: C3 hyoid bone C4 bifurcation of common carotid artery thyroid cartilage  C6 cricoid cartilage trachea begins (end of la...
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Vertebral metastases

Vertebral metastases represent the secondary involvement of the vertebral spine by haematogenously-disseminated metastatic cells. They must be included in any differential diagnosis of a bone lesion in a patient older than 40 years. This article will focus only on the metastasis involving the b...
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Vertebral pneumatocyst

Vertebral pneumatocysts are gas-filled cavities within the spinal vertebrae. They are most common at cervical levels. In general, vertebral pneumatocysts are less common than intraosseous pneumatocysts in the pelvis, especially adjacent to the sacroiliac joint. Pathogenesis Although not comple...
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Vertebral scalloping

Vertebral scalloping is a concavity to the posterior (or less commonly anterior) aspect of the vertebral body when viewed in a lateral projection. A small amount of concavity is normal, as is concavity of the anterior vertebral body (see vertebral body squaring). Posterior scalloping Causes of...
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Vertebral vascular foramen

Vertebral vascular foramina are normal findings seen on cross-sectional imaging and should not be mistaken for a fracture, especially in the setting of trauma. They transmit: basivertebral veins (forms Hahn's canal): foramen is seen on the posterior surface of the vertebral body in the midline...
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Vertebral venous plexus

The vertebral venous plexus is a highly anastomotic network of valveless veins running along the entire length of the vertebral column from the foramen magnum to the sacral hiatus. Gross anatomy The vertebral venous plexus is comprised of three interconnected divisions: internal vertebral ven...
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Vertebra plana

Vertebra plana (a.k.a. pancake / silver dollar / coin-on-edge vertebra) is the term given when a vertebral body has lost almost its entire height anteriorly and posteriorly, representing a very advanced compression fracture. Plural is vertebrae planae. It can occur in a variety of settings, incl...
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Vertebra plana (mnemonic)

Mnemonics to remember the causes of vertebra plana include: IMELT FETISH Mnemonics IMELT I: infection M: metastasis/myeloma E: eosinophilic granuloma L: lymphoma/leukemia T: trauma; tuberculosis FETISH F: fracture (trauma) E: eosinophilic granuloma T: tumor (e.g. metastases, myeloma...
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Vertebroplasty

Vertebroplasty is an imaging-guided procedure which entails percutaneous injection of surgical polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement into a diseased vertebral body. Vertebroplasty provides pain relief and strengthening of the bone of vertebrae weakened by disease. Indications It can be used as ...
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Vertex

The vertex is the midline bony landmark at the most superior part of the calvaria in the standard anatomical position, near the midpoint of the sagittal suture (i.e. between the bregma and lambda). It is one of the skull landmarks, craniometric points for radiological or anthropological skull m...
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Vertical-banded gastroplasty

Vertical-banded gastroplasty (VBG) is an older, purely restrictive procedure used to treat morbid obesity. Procedure It involves creating a small gastric pouch, based on the lesser curvature of the stomach (which is thicker and less resistant to stretching than the greater curvature), by using...
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Vertical fissure line in the lung

The vertical fissure line commences in or near the costodiaphragmatic recess and heads superomedially towards the hilum and terminates before or at the horizontal fissure. More commonly occurs on the right and may indicate partial volume loss of the lower lobe 1.
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Vertical muscle of the tongue

The vertical muscle of the tongue is one of the 4 intrinsic muscles of the tongue which alters the shape of the tongue mass, being entirely confined to the tongue without an attachment outside the tongue (like the extrinsic muscles of the tongue). Gross anatomy The muscles fibers attach proxim...
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Verumontanum

The verumontanum or seminal colliculus is the rounded eminence of the urethral crest within the posterior wall of the mid prostatic urethra. The prostatic utricle opens into it in the midline and the two ejaculatory ducts open just distal to the utricle. On either side of it lie the prostatic si...
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Very bizarre generalised lesions of bone (differential)

Very bizarre generalised lesions of bone tend to make you exclaim "Oh my! What is going here?"  Although there are numerous potential causes, in this situation it is worth thinking of a number of entities: skeletal dysplasias and metabolic diseases Paget disease fibrous dysplasia phakomatose...
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Vesico-urachal diverticulum

Vesico-urachal diverticulum is one of the congenital urachal remnant abnormalities. Gross anatomy It is the proximal equivalent of a urachal umbilical sinus, representing a result of the failure of the urachus to close at the urinary bladder, forming an out-pouching of variable length from the...
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Vesicoureteric junction

The vesicoureteric junction (VUJ) is the most distal portion of a ureter, at the point where it connects to the urinary bladder.  Terminology VUJ is synonymous with "ureterovesicular junction" (UVJ). It is nearly synonymous with "ureteral orifice" (UO), although depending on the context, the V...
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Vesicoureteric reflux

Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is the term for abnormal flow of urine from the bladder into the upper urinary tract and is typically encountered in young children.  For grading of vesicoureteric reflux, please refer to vesicoureteric reflux grading. Epidemiology The incidence of urinary tract in...
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Vesicoureteric reflux (grading)

Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) grading divides vesicoureteric reflux according to the height of reflux up the ureters and degree of dilatation of the ureters: grade 1: reflux limited to the ureter grade 2: reflux up to the renal pelvis grade 3: mild dilatation of ureter and pelvicalyceal system ...
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Vesicovaginal fistula

Vesicovaginal fistulas are abnormal fistulous connections between the urinary bladder and vagina, resulting in an involuntary discharge of urine through the vagina. Epidemiology The overall incidence of vesicovaginal fistula is unknown but was reported to be 2.11 per 100 births in Nigeria 1. ...
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Vesicovaginal reflux

Vesicovaginal reflux is a well-known entity rarely encountered by radiologists. It is a behavioral disorder, a type of dysfunctional elimination syndrome commonly encountered in pre-pubertal girls. It is defined as reflux of urine into the vaginal vault either in supine or upright position durin...
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Vestibular aqueduct

The vestibular aqueduct is a structure of the inner ear being part of the osseous labyrinth. It contains the endolymphatic duct and sac. It normally has a diameter of ~1.5 mm (similar to the posterior semicircular canal) and runs from the vestibule in a transverse direction to the long axis of t...
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Vestibular line of Lapayowker

The vestibular line of Lapayowker refers to a vertical line passing down the most lateral aspect of vestibular apparatus. The petrous part of internal carotid artery lies medial to this line but lies lateral to it in the case of an aberrant internal carotid artery which is the characteristic ang...
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Vestibule (disambiguation)

A vestibule is an anatomical term and refers to a small cavity at the proximal end of a tube. vestibule (aorta) vestibule (ear) vestibule (larynx) vestibule (mouth) vestibule (nose) vestibule (esophagus) vestibule (vulva) History and etymology Vestibule derives ultimately from the Latin...
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Vestibule (ear)

The vestibule is an approximately 4 mm central chamber of the bony labyrinth. It is dominated by depressions housing the: utricle (elliptical recess) saccule (spherical recess) basal end of the cochlear duct (cochlear recess) The cribrose areas have perforations through which the nerve bundl...
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Vestibule of the vulva

The vestibule of the vulva (vestibule of the vagina in some texts 2) is the area between the labia minora, and posterior to the glans of the clitoris. It marks the boundary between the vagina and the vulva. The urethra, vagina and the greater vestibular glands open out into the vestibule.
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Vestibulocochlear nerve

The vestibulocochlear nerve is the eighth cranial nerve and has two roles: innervation to the cochlea for hearing innervation to the vestibule for acceleration and balance senses Gross anatomy It emerges between the pons and the medulla, lateral to the facial nerve and nervus intermedius, pa...
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Vicarious contrast material excretion

Vicarious contrast material excretion (VCME) defines excretion of water-soluble contrast material in a way other than via normal renal secretion.  The most common vicarious excretion of water-soluble contrast material is via the liver, resulting in increased bile density seen in the gallbladder...
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Vickers ligament

Vickers ligament is a ligamentous structure connecting the lunate bone and TFCC to the distal radius and is seen in the vast majority of patients with Madelung deformity 1. Release of this thickened ligament may help in improving symptoms associated with Madelung deformity 2.
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Video

Video files are useful in a limited number of situations, but should NOT be used for routine stacks of scrollable images (such as CT or MRI). The reasons to use video include:  ultrasound cine clips cardiac MRI some dynamic barium studies At present video support is limited.  Currently the ...
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Videofluoroscopic swallow study

Videofluoroscopic swallow studies (also often called modified barium swallow studies) are a variation on traditional barium swallow studies. Although typical barium swallow studies / esophagrams evaluate the pharynx, the goal in these studies is to even more closely evaluate the oral cavity, pha...
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Vidian artery

There are two arteries passing through Vidian canal from the pterygopalatine fossa to the petrous portion of the ICA. One is a branch of the internal maxillary artery (itself a branch of the ECA) and the other is from the C2 segment of the ICA. It therefore forms one of the ICA to ECA anastamoses.

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