Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

2,055 results found
Article

Combined conduit score of sinovenous stenosis

The combined conduit score (CCS) is a grading scheme for the assessment of the degree of transverse-sigmoid sinus stenosis in the setting of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. The score was initially developed for ATECO MR venography 1. Parameters Assessment is performed using maximum inten...
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Bing-Neel syndrome

Bing-Neel syndrome is an extremely rare neurological complication of Waldenström macroglobulinemia where there is malignant lymphocyte infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS). Epidemiology The exact incidence is unknown, however in one study of patients with Waldenström macroglobuli...
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Raymond–Roy occlusion classification of intracranial aneurysms

The Raymond–Roy occlusion classification (RROC) is an angiographic classification scheme for grading the occlusion of endovascularly treated intracranial aneurysms 1. It is also known as the Raymond class, Montreal scale or the Raymond Montreal scale. class I: complete obliteration class II: r...
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Shunt-dependency in symptomatic aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage score

The shunt-dependency in symptomatic aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SDASH) score is a harmonized score for the prediction of hydrocephalus requiring shunting after subarachnoid haemorrhage. The tool is employed in the acute phase to predict which patients will require shunting, rather than ...
Article

O'Kelly-Marotta grading scale

The O'Kelly-Marotta (OKM) grading scale is a proposed method of assessing the degree of angiographic filling and contrast stasis in the setting of intracranial aneurysms treated by endovascular flow diversion. Taking into account the dynamic nature of the contrast stasis, it is designed for use ...
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Glomus tympanicum paraganglioma

Glomus tympanicum paragangliomas (chemodectomas) are the most common middle ear tumour.  Epidemiology There is a female predominance (M:F = 1:3); presentation is most common when patients are more than 40 years old 1,2.  Clinical presentation May be incidental but symptomatic masses produce ...
Article

Globe rupture

Globe rupture is an ophthalmologic emergency. A ruptured globe or an open-globe injury must be assessed in any patient who has suffered orbital trauma because open-globe injuries are a major cause of blindness. In a blunt trauma, ruptures are most common at the insertions of the intraocular mus...
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Gliosis

Gliosis is the focal proliferation of glial cells in the CNS in response to insult. By strict definition, gliosis is not synonymous with encephalomalacia which is the end result of liquefactive necrosis of brain parenchyma following an insult. Radiologically they share similar features and the d...
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Gliosarcoma

Gliosarcomas are a variant of glioblastoma (along with epithelioid glioblastoma and giant cell glioblastoma) recognised in the current (2016) WHO classification of CNS tumours 9. They are highly malignant (WHO grade IV) primary intra-axial neoplasms with both glial and mesenchymal elements. Ter...
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Gliomatosis cerebri

Gliomatosis cerebri is a rare growth pattern of diffuse gliomas that involves at least three lobes by definition. There often is an important discordance between clinical and radiological findings, as it may be clinically silent while it appears as a very extensive process radiologically. Impor...
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Orbital blow-out fracture

Orbital blow-out fractures occur when there is a fracture of one of the walls of orbit but the orbital rim remains intact. Typically, this is caused by a direct blow to the central orbit from a fist or ball. Epidemiology The blow-out fracture is the commonest type of orbital fracture and is us...
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Glial cells

Glial cells, or neuroglia, are cells that surround the neurones of the central nervous system embedded between them, providing both structural and physiological support 1-3.  Together they account for almost half of the total mass 1 and 90% of all cells of the central nervous system 3. Glial ce...
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Giant cell glioblastoma

Giant cell glioblastoma is a variant of glioblastoma (along with epithelioid glioblastoma and giant cell glioblastoma) recognised in the current (2016) WHO classification of CNS tumours 7. This tumour was previously called monstrocellular tumour due to the macro size of its cells. Epidemiology ...
Article

Germinoma

The term germinoma usually refers to a tumour of the brain (WHO Classification of CNS tumours), but can also refer to similar tumours of the ovary and testis. dysgerminoma of the ovary seminoma of the testis CNS germinoma All three tumours share similar histology. 
Article

Germinal matrix haemorrhage

Germinal matrix haemorrhages, also know as periventricular-intraventricular haemorrhages (PVIH), correspond to the most common type of intracranial haemorrhage in neonates and are related to a perinatal stress affecting the highly vascularised subependymal germinal matrix. The majority of cases ...
Article

Gemistocytic astrocytoma

Gemistocytic astrocytoma is a histologic subtype of low grade astrocytoma, with a poorer prognosis than other matched WHO grade tumours, and with no specific imaging features.  For a general discussion of clinical presentation, epidemiology, treatment please refer to the article on low grade as...
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Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) peak

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system 1 and as such, is one of the compounds examined in MR spectroscopy.  It is present in the human brain at a concentration of about 1 mM, a whole order of magnitude lower than some of the more...
Article

Giant cerebral aneurysm

Giant cerebral aneurysms are ones that measure >25 mm in greatest dimension.  Epidemiology Giant cerebral aneurysms account for ~5% of all intracranial aneurysms 1,3. They occur in the 5th-7th decades and are more common in females 2. Clinical presentation Patients can present with symptoms ...
Article

Gerstmann syndrome

Gerstmann syndrome, also known as angular gyrus syndrome, is a dominant hemisphere stroke syndrome consisting of four components:  agraphia or dysgraphia acalculia or dyscalculia finger agnosia left-right disorientation Pure Gerstmann syndrome is said to be without aphasia. History and ety...
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Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease

Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease is a very rare type of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. It manifests with dementia and/or ataxia and is due to a mutation in the prion protein (PRNP) gene, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern.  History and etymology It is par...
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Ganglioneuroma

Ganglioneuromas are fully differentiated neuronal tumours that do not contain immature elements and potentially occur anywhere along the peripheral autonomic ganglion sites.  On imaging, usually, they present as well-defined solid masses and can be quite large at presentation. Generally, they a...
Article

Intradiploic epidermoid cyst

Intradiploic epidermoid cysts represent epidermoid cysts that occur in the intradiploic space of the skull. Clinical presentation Painless slowly progressive scalp swelling. Pathology epidermoid cysts may be congenital (most common, arising from ectodermal inclusion during neural tube closur...
Article

Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome

Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome (DDMS) is a condition chararacterised by hemi cerebral atrophy/hypoplasia secondary to brain insult usually in fetal or early childhood period and is accompanied by ipsilateral compensatory osseous hypertrophy and contralateral hemiparesis. It is characterised by: ...
Article

Rasmussen encephalitis

Rasmussen encephalitis (RE), also known as chronic focal encephalitis (not to be confused with a Rasmussen aneurysm), is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown origin, usually affecting one brain hemisphere. Epidemiology Most cases (85% cases) occur in children under the age of 10 years 1. ...
Article

Chiari II malformation

Chiari II malformation, also known as Arnold-Chiari malformation, is a relatively common congenital malformation of the spine and posterior fossa characterised by myelomeningocoele (lumbosacral spina bifida aperta) and a small posterior fossa with a descent of the brainstem and cerebellar tonsil...
Article

Maple syrup urine disease

Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a very rare metabolic disorder. It is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, which classically affects the brain tissue resulting in impairment or death if untreated. Clinical presentation Manifests itself in the first few days of life (12-24 hours) with ...
Article

Macrocerebellum

Macrocerebellum, also known as cerebellar hyperplasia, refers to a rare condition characterised by an abnormally enlarged cerebellum with preserved architecture and shape. It is usually demonstrated on imaging with a thickening of the cortical grey matter of the cerebellar hemispheres. Epidemio...
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MALT lymphoma (dura)

MALT lymphomas of the dura (also known as extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue of the dura), are an uncommon form of CNS lymphoma, accounting for an even smaller proportion of dural masses. They are, however, the most common form of primary dural lymphoma.  Unl...
Article

Focal cortical dysplasia

Focal cortical dysplasias (FCD) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders of cortical formation, which may demonstrate both architectural and proliferative features. They are one of the most common causes of epilepsy and can be associated with hippocampal sclerosis and cortical glioneuronal n...
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Flavivirus encephalitis

Flavivirus encephalitis includes a number of entities which characteristically involve the basal ganglia and thalami.  Clinical presentation Typically these conditions present with a prodrome which is nonspecific but indicative of a viral infection. Symptoms include fever, myalgia, rash, rigou...
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CT perfusion in ischaemic stroke

CT perfusion in ischaemic stroke has become established in most centres with stroke services as an important adjunct, along with CT angiography (CTA), to conventional unenhanced CT brain imaging.  It enables differentiation of salvageable ischaemic brain tissue (the penumbra) from irrevocably d...
Article

Focal brainstem glioma

Focal brainstem gliomas are a relatively uncommon type of brainstem glioma, which carry a more favourable prognosis compared to the more common diffuse brainstem glioma. The name is a reflection of the imaging findings, which demonstrate a sharply demarcated mass with relatively frequent enhance...
Article

Focal areas of signal intensity (brain)

Focal areas of signal intensity (FASI), alternatively called focal abnormal signal intensity or unidentified bright objects (UBO), are bright areas on T2-weighted images commonly identified in the basal ganglia (often the globus pallidus), thalamus, brainstem (pons), cerebellum, and subcortical ...
Article

Fibrous meningioma

Fibrous meningiomas (also known as fibroblastic meningiomas) are the second most common histological subtype of meningioma, found in ~50% of all meningiomas, usually along with meningothelial histology (40%) or in isolation (7%). They are, for some reason, the most common intraventricular mening...
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Choristoma

A choristoma is simply a collection of microscopically normal cells or tissues in an abnormal location. This is different to a hamartoma which is derived only from local tissues. Examples include: adrenal choristoma (myelolipoma) nasopharyngeal choristoma facial nerve choristoma optic nerve...
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Fibrocartilaginous embolism

Fibrocartilaginous embolism (also known as nucleus pulposus embolism) is a rare cause of spinal cord ischaemia due to embolisation of nucleus pulposus material from intervertebral disc in a retrograde direction into a spinal artery or vein. Fibrocartilaginous embolism is a diagnosis of suspicio...
Article

Visual system

The visual system transmits visual information from the retina within the eyes to the primary visual cortex of the occipital lobe as well as the pretectal nuclei and superior colliculi of the midbrain. Gross anatomy Below the visual pathway is described from distal to proximal in a single hemi...
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Orbit

The orbit is a feature of the face and contains the globe and it's supporting structures, as well as many nerves and vessels. Gross anatomy In the adult, the orbit has a volume of approximately 30 mL, of which the globe occupies 6.5 mL. It has a roof, floor, medial and lateral wall. The orbit ...
Article

Lateral thoracic meningocele

Lateral thoracic meningoceles are a type of spinal meningocoele. Pathology As with any meningocele, it results from herniation of the meninges through a foramen or a defect in the vertebral column.  Associations They are typically associated with neurofibromatosis type I but can rarely occur...
Article

Frontoethmoidal encephalocele

Frontoethmoidal encephaloceles are second only to occipital encephaloceles in terms of frequency, representing approximately 15% of all encephaloceles. They represent meninges or brain tissue herniating through a cranial defect in the anterior cranial fossa and typically result in facial deformi...
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Fetal hydrocephalus

Fetal hydrocephalus often refers to an extension of fetal ventriculomegaly where the ventricular dilatation is more severe. It is usually defined when the fetal lateral ventricular diameter is greater than 15 mm 1. Epidemiology The estimated incidence is 0.5-3% per 1000 live births. There may ...
Article

Fat embolism syndrome

Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a rare clinical condition caused by circulating fat emboli leading to a multisystemic dysfunction. The classical clinical triad consists of: respiratory distress cerebral abnormalities petechial haemorrhages Epidemiology It occurs in ~2.5% (range 0.5-4%) of th...
Article

Fatal familial insomnia

Fatal familial insomnia is an extremely rare autosomally inherited prion disease 1. Unlike other prion diseases, it does not exhibit spongiform changes. The main pathological findings are gliosis in the inferior olivary nuclei and thalami.
Article

Falx ossification

In discussing mineralisation of the falx cerebri, many radiology textbooks use the term falx calcification and make no mention of falx ossification.  Epidemiology Ossification of dural folds is relatively unusual; one study suggested a prevalence of falx ossification of 0.7% 1. Even though, os...
Article

Extrapontine myelinolysis

Extrapontine myelinolysis (EPM) is one of the complications occurring secondary to rapid correction of hyponatraemia, and is, along with central pontine myelinolysis encompassed by the more recent term osmotic demyelination syndrome. In the vast majority of cases it is associated with central p...
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Extraocular muscle nerve supply (mnemonic)

A mnemonic to remember the nerve supply to the extraocular muscles: LR6SO4O3 (mock 'chemical formula') Mnemonic The letters represent the extraocular muscles and numbers represent their respective cranial nerve supply: LR6: lateral rectus, innervated by the 6th (abducens) nerve  SO4: superi...
Article

Progressive supranuclear palsy

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), also known as the Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, is a taupathy and considered a neurodegenerative disease with no currently efficacious treatment.  Epidemiology Progressive supranuclear palsy typically becomes clinically apparent in the 6th decade o...
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Sickle cell disease (cerebral manifestations)

Cerebral manifestations of sickle cell disease contribute significantly to the overall morbidity of the disease. Sickle cell disease is among the most common causes of stroke in the paediatric population. For a general discussion of sickle cell disease, please refer to sickle cell disease. Epi...
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Cerebral fat embolism

Cerebral fat embolism is one manifestation of fat embolism syndrome. Epidemiology Cerebral fat embolism typically occurs in patients with bony fractures (usually long bones of the lower limb). Rarely it has been described as part of a sickle cell crisis with bone marrow fat necrosis and subseq...
Article

Facial nerve choristoma

Facial nerve choristomas are rare, being characterised by non-neoplastic proliferation of smooth muscle cells and fibrous tissue. Facial nerve choristomas presumably can occur anywhere along the course of the facial nerve (CN VII), although the only cases reported are in the internal acoustic me...
Article

Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a group of condition with a common clinical and radiologic presentation. It is characterised by thunderclap headache and reversible vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries. Terminology A number of terms have been used to describe this e...
Article

Fabry disease

Fabry disease is a multisystem disorder which results from an X-linked inborn error of metabolism. The disease is characterised by a deficiency in hydrolase alpha-galactosidase activity with a resultant abnormal accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in various organ systems. In men, the co...
Article

Transient ischaemic attack

Transient ischaemic attack (TIA), in the most recent definition, corresponds to a transient episode of neurological dysfunction caused by focal brain, spinal cord, or retinal ischaemia, without acute infarction. Terminology  In the past, TIA was arbitrarily distinguished from stroke by the dur...
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Starfield pattern (fat embolism)

A starfield pattern has been described as being typical of DWI imaging of patients with cerebral fat embolism1,2. Although the term is closely linked to the diagnosis of fat embolism, it should be noted that such an appearance is merely the result of very numerous microemboli. As such a similar ...
Article

Meningioma

Meningiomas are extra-axial tumours and represent the most common tumour of the meninges. They are a non-glial neoplasm that originates from the meningocytes or arachnoid cap cells of the meninges, and are located anywhere that meninges are found, and in some places where only rest cells are pre...
Article

Extrapulmonary tuberculosis

Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) refers to the haematogenous spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Pathology Extrapulmonary tubercuosis can occur as a primary form of the disease, i.e. direct infection of an extrapulmonary organ without the presence of primary pulmonary tuberculosis or it can ...
Article

Erdheim-Chester disease

Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell, non-familial multisystemic granulomatosis, with widespread manifestations and of highly variable severity. The most common presenting symptom is bone pain. Epidemiology Erdheim-Chester disease is a rare, non-inherited disease of midd...
Article

Transient global amnesia

Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a clinical syndrome with no clear aetiology identified. Most symptoms are transient and resolve within a few hours.  Epidemiology Most common in patients of older age (50-70 years old). Clinical presentation Anterograde and partial retrograde amnesia lasting...
Article

Thalamic haemorrhage

Thalamic haemorrhages or thalamic haemorrhagic strokes are often the result of chronic hypertension. The thalamus transmits or prevents transmission of sensory signals from sensory areas of the cerebral cortex through internal capsule fibres and has a role in memory thus the clinical presentatio...
Article

Tethered cord

Tethered spinal cord syndrome, also known as an occult spinal dysraphism sequence, is a neurological disorder caused by tissue attachments that limit the movement of the spinal cord within the spinal column. Clinical presentation The condition is closely linked to spina bifida, and as such pre...
Article

Terminal myelocystocele

Terminal myelocystoceles are an uncommon form of spinal dysraphism representing marked dilatation of the central canal of the spinal cord, herniating posteriorly through a dorsal spinal defect. The result is a skin-covered mass in the lower lumbar region, consisting of an ependyma-lined sac.  E...
Article

Temporal lobe epilepsy

Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common type of partial epilepsy, with often characteristic imaging and clinical findings. It is divided into two broad groups: medial epilepsy most common involves the mesial temporal lobe structures most frequently due to mesial temporal sclerosis l...
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Taylor dysplasia

Taylor dysplasia is a type of focal cortical dysplasia and a common cause of refractory epilepsy. Under both the Palmini classification and the more recent Blumcke classification of focal cortical dysplasia, Taylor dysplasia is classified as type II.  For further discussion of the radiographic ...
Article

Epidural angiolipoma

Epidural angiolipomas are rare benign tumours composed of mature adipocytes and abnormal vessels.  Epidemiology Epidural angiolipomas are more frequently encountered in women, and typically in middle age (40-50 years of age) 1.  Clinical presentation In keeping with the slow growth of these ...
Article

Endolymphatic sac tumour

Endolymphatic sac tumours (ELST) are very rare, locally invasive tumours of endolymphatic sac. Early detection of these tumours is critical, because early surgical intervention may prevent further hearing loss. Endolymphatic sac tumours do not metastasize but are highly locally aggressive.  Epi...
Article

Encephalitis lethargica

Encephalitis lethargica, also known as von Economo encephalitis, is a rare disease of unknown aetiology that affects the midbrain and basal ganglia.  Clinical presentation Symptoms are initially that of pharyngitis followed by lethargy, extrapyramidal movements (parkinsonism and dyskinesias), ...
Article

Tympanic membrane retraction

Tympanic membrane retraction usually occurs when a portion of the tympanic membrane becomes weakened and is pulled inwards by the negative pressure within the middle ear.  Pathology As the tympanic membrane is pulled inwards (medially), it can become draped over the ossicles, resulting in a va...
Article

Tuberculous pachymeningitis

Tuberculous pachymeningitis is a rare form of CNS tuberculosis characterised by a chronic tuberculous infection leading to a dura mater involvement. Common sites of involvement are cavernous sinuses, floor of middle cranial fossa and tentorium. This condition should not be confused with the com...
Article

Tuberculous otomastoiditis

Tuberculous otomastoiditis is an uncommon form of acute otomastoiditis that occurs secondary to tuberculosis infection, although its frequency is increasing as a result of greater population of immunocompromised patients. Clinical presentation Classically it is described as presenting with pa...
Article

Tuberculous meningitis

Tuberculous meningitis is the most common presentation of intracranial tuberculosis, and usually refers to infection of the leptomeninges. Uncommonly tuberculosis can be limited to the pachymeninges (dura mater), it is called as tuberculous pachymeningitis and is discussed separately.  The rema...
Article

Tuberculous encephalopathy

Tuberculous (TB) encephalopathy is a rare manifestation of CNS tuberculosis and is exclusively seen in children and infants with pulmonary TB. It is characterised by cerebral oedema sometimes with features similar to acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), and may manifest with a variety of...
Article

Extracranial meningioma

Extracranial meningiomas, also known as primary extradural meningiomas or ectopic meningioma, are a rare location-specific type of meningioma that arise outside the dural covering of the brain and spinal cord. They are essentially extracranial tumours, most often occurring in the head and neck, ...
Article

Tuberculoma

Tuberculomas or tuberculous granulomas are well defined focal masses that result from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and are one of the more severe morphological forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculomas most commonly occur in the brain (see: CNS tuberculosis) and the lung (see: pulmonary tuberc...
Article

Exencephaly

Exencephaly is a lethal congenital fetal brain developmental anomaly (neural tube defect) considered to be a precursor to anencephaly in the acrania-exencephaly-anencephaly sequence. Pathology It is characterised by calvarial absence and loss of fetal brain tissue to variable degrees and is co...
Article

Trigeminal neuralgia

Trigeminal neuralgia or tic douloureux corresponds to a clinical manifestation of sudden severe paroxysms of excruciating pain on one side of the face which usually lasts a few seconds to a few minutes, involving one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve (CN V). Vascular compression is the mo...
Article

Traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage

Traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage (tSAH) is a common injury, and trauma is the most common cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH).  Epidemiology Traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage occurs in ~35% (range 11-60%) of traumatic brain injuries 1.  Pathology Traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage is ...
Article

Trapped ventricle

Trapped ventricle, also known as isolated ventricle, is a condition in which there is an obstruction to the entry and exit path of CSF through the ventricle. Clinical presentation The presentation is that of increased intracranial pressure due to expanded trapped ventricle. trapped temporal h...
Article

Transverse myelitis

Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is an inflammatory condition affecting both halves of the spinal cord and associated with rapidly progressive motor, sensory, and autonomic dysfunction. It is mostly imaged with MRI, which generally shows a long segment (3-4 segments or more) of T2 increased sign...
Article

Epithelioid glioblastoma

Epithelioid glioblastoma is a variant of glioblastoma (along with gliosarcoma and giant cell glioblastoma) only recently added to the WHO classification of CNS tumours as part of the 2016 update 1.  Terminology Whether or not epithelioid glioblastomas are distinct from rhabdoid glioblastomas i...
Article

Uraemic encephalopathy

Uraemic encephalopathy (UE) is an acquired toxic syndrome characterised by delirium in patients with untreated or inadequately treated end-stage renal disease. UE is often associated with lethargy and confusion in the acute phase, which can progress to seizures, coma, or both in the chronic phas...
Article

Unclassified cerebellar dysplasia

Unclassified cerebellar dysplasia is defined as focal or diffuse dysplasia of cerebellar hemispheres or vermis not associated with other known malformations or syndromes. Clinical presentation Can present with hypotonia, microcephaly or speech delay. Radiographic features MRI brain asymmetr...
Article

Uncal herniation

Uncal herniation is a subtype of transtentorial downward brain herniation, usually related to cerebral mass effect increasing the intracranial pressure. Clinical presentation Abnormal posture and poor GCS. There may be pupillary dilation and loss of light reflex due to direct compression of th...
Article

Encephalocele

Encephalocele, also known as meningoencephalocele, is a form of neural tube defect and a type of cephalocele where brain tissue and overlying meninges herniate out through a defect in the cranium.  Terminology It should be distinguished from cranial meningocele in which the lesion contains onl...
Article

Tumour-to-tumour metastasis

A tumour-to-tumour metastasis, also known as a collision tumour, is a rare metastatic process in which a primary malignant tumour ('donor') metastasises to another tumour ('recipient'), most commonly a benign tumour such as a meningioma. Epidemiology Tumour-to-tumour metastasis is considered v...
Article

Tumour pseudoprogression

Tumour pseudoprogression, also known just as pseudoprogression, corresponds to an increase of lesion size related to treatment, which simulates progressive disease. The term is largely used in brain tumours imaging follow-up, especially for high grade gliomas (e.g. glioblastoma), and is observed...
Article

Tumefactive perivascular spaces

Tumefactive perivascular spaces (TPVS) is a rare finding of enlargement of perivascular spaces. It is important to recognise this condition as it can be easily mistaken for a neoplasm and also rarely local mass effect from TPVS can result in complication. Clinical presentation Small case serie...
Article

Tumefactive multiple sclerosis

Tumefactive multiple sclerosis is a term used to describe patients with established multiple sclerosis who develop large aggressive demyelinating lesions, similar/identical in appearance to those seen in sporadic tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDL). TDL is now considered to be a separate ent...
Article

Tumefactive demyelinating lesion

Tumefactive demyelinating lesion (TDL), also sometimes referred to as monofocal acute inflammatory demyelination (MAID), is a locally aggressive form of demyelination, usually manifesting as a solitary lesion (or sometimes a couple of lesions) greater than 2 cm that may mimic a neoplasm on imagi...
Article

En plaque meningioma

En plaque meningiomas refer to a specific meningioma macroscopic appearance characterised by diffuse and extensive dural involvement, usually with extracranial extension into calvarium, orbit, and soft tissues. These tumours are thought to have a collar-like or sheet-like growth along the dura m...
Article

Encephalomalacia

Encephalomalacia is term given to describe softening or loss of brain parenchyma with or without surrounding gliosis, as a late manifestation of injury.  Clinical presentation asymptomatic  serve as a focus of seizure Pathology Encephalomalacia is the end result of liquefactive necrosis of ...
Article

Krabbe disease

Krabbe disease, also known as globoid cell leukodystrophy, is an autosomal recessive leukodystrophy.  Clinical presentation Can vary and depends on the age of onset 5. hypertonia irritability delayed milestones loss of developed milestones fever myoclonus opisthotonus nystagmus Pathol...
Article

Hydatid disease

Hydatid cysts result from infection by the Echinococcus, and can result in cyst formation anywhere in the body.  Pathology There are two main species of the Echinococcus tapeworm 1,2: Echinococcus granulosus commoner pastoral: dog is a main host; most common form sylvatic: wolf is a main h...
Article

Hypoglycaemic encephalopathy

Hypoglycaemic encephalopathy is a brain injury that results from prolonged or severe hypoglycaemia.  On imaging, it can manifest on MRI as bilateral areas of increased signal on both T2 and FLAIR affecting the posterior limb of the internal capsule, cerebral cortex (in particular parieto-occipi...

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