Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

1,984 results found
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Vitamin B9

Vitamin B9 (folate or folic acid) is a water soluble vitamin that is vital for the synthesis of several amino acids, the purines adenosine and guanine and the pyrimidine thymine (three of the four nucleotide bases and hence critical for the synthesis of nucleic acids.) The antimicrobial group s...
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Voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibody encephalitis

Voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibody encephalitis is an autoimmune encephalitis with antibodies against the voltage gated potassium channel. It is one of the most common forms of autoimmune limbic encephalitis in the absence of primary extra-CNS tumours. Autoimmune VGKC encephalitis c...
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Von Hippel-Lindau disease

Von Hippel-Lindau (vHL) disease is characterised by the development of numerous benign and malignant tumours in different organs (at least 40 types 1) due to mutations in the VHL tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 3. Epidemiology The disease is rare with an estimated prevalence of 1:35,000-5...
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Walker-Warburg syndrome

Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), sometimes known as HARDE syndrome, is an extremely rare lethal form of congenital muscular dystrophy. It is primarily characterised by: fetal hydrocephalus: almost always present neuronal migrational anomalies: agyria (cobblestone lissencephaly / lissencephaly ty...
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Wallerian degeneration

Wallerian degeneration (WaD) is the process of antegrade degeneration of the axons and their accompanying myelin sheaths following proximal axonal or neuronal cell body lesions. It may result following neuronal loss due to cerebral infarction, trauma, necrosis, focal demyelination or haemorrhage...
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Wasp-waist sign (spine)

The wasp-waist sign is a radiographic appearance seen in patients with Klippel Feil syndrome. It results from fusion of the vertebral bodies such that the anteroposterior diameter at the level of the affected discovertebral joint is smaller than the diameter at the superior and inferior limits o...
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Watershed cerebral infarction

Watershed cerebral infarctions, also known as border zone infarcts, occur at the border between cerebral vascular territories where the tissue is furthest from arterial supply and thus most vulnerable to reductions in perfusion.  Epidemiology Watershed cerebral infarction account for 5-10% of ...
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Weber syndrome

Weber syndrome is a midbrain stroke syndrome that involves the fascicles of the oculomotor nerve resulting in an ipsilateral CN III palsy and contralateral hemiplegia or hemiparesis 1-3. Using imaging alone, it is difficult to distinguish Weber from Benedikt syndrome, unless clear involvement o...
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Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome

Wernicke encephalopathy, also referred as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, is due to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency, and is typically seen in alcoholics. On imaging, it is commonly seen on MRI as areas of symmetrical increased T2/FLAIR signal involving the mamillary bodies, dorsomedial thalami, t...
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Wernicke's area

Wernicke's area (Brodmann area 22) is an area of the posterior temporal lobe in the dominant hemisphere concerned with the receptive components of speech. Gross anatomy Wernicke's area is located in the superior temporal gyrus, posterior to the posterior commissure line. Relations It is boun...
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WFNS grading system

The WFNS (World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies) grading system uses the Glasgow Coma Scale and presence of focal neurological deficits to grade the severity of subarachnoid haemorrhage. This grading system was proposed in 1988, and this is one of the accepted systems (although not conside...
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Whipple disease (neurological manifestations)

Neurological manifestations of Whipple disease are rare. Whipple's disease can also appear as a primary neurological disorder in rare cases. It is rarely incidentally found as a differential diagnosis in patients with a progressive neurological deficit. It has been suggested that neurological i...
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White cerebellum sign

White cerebellum sign, also called reversal sign or dense cerebellum sign, is encountered when there is a diffuse decrease in density of the supratentorial brain parenchyma, with relatively increased attenuation of the thalami, brainstem and cerebellum. This sign indicates irreversible brain dam...
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White epidermoid

White epidermoids are a rare type of epidermoid cyst that do not follow the usual near-CSF density and signal intensity on CT and MR respectively. To make matters worse the literature uses the term inconsistently, although generally the 'white' refers to the T1 weighted imaging appearance.  Rad...
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White matter buckling sign

The white matter buckling sign is helpful in distinguishing an extra-axial mass from an intra-axial one, and represents the white matter projecting into gyri being compressed and displaced by the mass, even in the presence of oedema (which would usually expand gyri, if the mass were intra-axial)...
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White matter changes in HIV

White matter changes in HIV have overlapping appearances and varied in aetiology. These can be divided into: primary effects of HIV opportunistic infection neoplasms vascular disease metabolic and nutritional disorders Primary effects of HIV HIV encephalitis Opportunistic infection cyto...
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White matter disorders

White matter diseases are a group of conditions that predominantly or significantly affect the white matter of the brain. They comprise a vast heterogeneous group and have a variety of appearances and presentations. They cause disease by altering the process of normal myelination.  Useful group...
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White matter tracts

White matter tracts, also known as white matter fibres, are classified into three categories: Projection tracts tracts connecting the cortex with other area in the CNS, e.g. deep nuclei, brainstem, cerebellum or spine may be efferent (motor) or afferent tracts (sensory) white matter tracts t...
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White matter tracts of the spinal cord

The spinal cord has numeorus white matter tracts that ascend and descend in the peripheral substance of the cord. They can be divided by their location and function: anterolateral columns anterior corticospinal tract medial longitudinal fasiculus spinothalamic tracts lateral spinothalamic t...
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WHO classification of CNS tumours

The WHO classification of CNS tumours is the most widely accepted system for classifying CNS tumours and was based on the histological characteristics of the tumour. Although the most recent version of the 'blue book' is the 4th edition from 2007, an update has been released in 2016 3, which sho...
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WHO grading of CNS tumours

WHO (World Health Organisation) grading of CNS tumours is based on histological characteristics such as cellularity, mitotic activity, pleomorphism, necrosis, and endothelial proliferation (neoangiogenesis). It is used in the WHO classification of CNS tumours.  It should be noted that at the ti...
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WHO grading system for diffuse astrocytomas

 The WHO grading system is the most widely used system for grading diffuse astrocytomas (at the time of writing i.e. mid 2016), and is an adaptation of the now superseded  St Anne-Mayo grading system (also known as the Daumas-Duport grading system).  Grade I is reserved for localised astrocytom...
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Wildervanck syndrome

Wildervanck syndrome, also known as cervico-ocular-acoustic dysplasia, consists of the triad of: Klippel-Feil syndrome congenital ossicular anomalies: usually diffuse ossicular ankylosis and sensorineural deafness. Duane's retraction syndrome: an ocular motility disturbance due to fibrosis of...
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Wilson disease

Wilson disease, also known as hepatolenticular degeneration, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism affecting multiple systems.  Epidemiology Wilson disease is commonly found in Japan. It affects 1 in 30,000-40,000 individuals 12. Clinical presentation Clinical presentat...
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Wilson disease (CNS manifestations)

Wilson disease, also known as hepatolenticular degeneration, is a multisystem disease due to abnormal accumulation of copper. It is characterised by early onset liver cirrhosis with CNS findings most frequently affecting the basal ganglia and midbrain. This article aims to discuss the central n...
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Xanthomatous meningioma

Xanthomatous meningiomas are rare histological variants of meningiomas grouped into the subtype of metaplastic meningiomas, being WHO grade I tumours. They are characterised by cells with a lipid-filled vacuolated cytoplasm. Although reported numbers are too small to confirm that this is defini...
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Y sign (epidural lipomatosis)

The Y sign refers to a common appearance in lumbar epidural lipomatosis where excess fat in the extradural space compresses the dural sac into the shape of the letter "Y". 
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Yasargil classification of vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations

The Yasargil classification is one of the two common systems for classifying vein of Galen malformations that is currently in use at the time of writing (mid 2016).  Classification type I: small pure cisternal fistula between the vein of Galen (voG) and either the pericallosal arteries (anteri...
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Zabramski classification of cerebral cavernous malformations

The Zabramski classification of cerebral cavernomas has been proposed as a way of classifying cerebral cavernous malformations, and although not used in clinical practice it is useful in scientific publications that seek to study cavernous malformations. The classification was proposed in 1994 ...
Article

Zebra sign (cerebellum)

The zebra sign has been termed to describe the finding of layering of blood in amongst the folia of the cerebellum, particularly in the setting of remote cerebellar haemorrhage.1 This type of haemorrhage is characterised by a streaky pattern, like a zebra's stripes, due to blood spreading in th...
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Zellweger syndrome

Zellweger syndrome (ZS), also known as the cerebrohepatorenal syndrome, is a multisystem metabolic abnormality. As the name implies it primarily affects the central nervous system (CNS), liver and kidneys.  Epidemiology The condition typically presents in neonates with poor feeding and/or seiz...

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