Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

1,498 results found
Article

Lymphocele of the thoracic duct

Introduction Lymphocele of the thoracic duct (thoracic duct cyst) is usually asymptomatic or less commonly may present as  left supraclavicular fossa mass 1. The clinical significance of a thoracic duct cyst lies in its misidentification as a pathological lesion at radiological assessment, whi...
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Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis

Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) is a benign lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by lymphocyte predominant infiltration of the lungs. It is classified as a subtype of interstitial lung disease. It also falls under the umbrella of non-lymphomatous pulmonary lymphoid disorders. E...
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Lymphomatoid granulomatosis

Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LG), also known as angiocentric lymphoma or angiocentric immunoproliferative lesion, is a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Pathology There is a recognised association with antecedent infection with the Epstein Barr virus (EBV).   It can affect a variety of org...
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Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (pulmonary manifestations)

Pulmonary manifestations of lymphomatoid granulomatosis are important since the lung is one of the most frequent sites of involvement in lymphomatoid granulomatosis. It falls under the group of pulmonary angiitis and granulomatosis. Pathology Some consider the condition to be midway between ov...
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Macklin effect (pulmonary interstitial emphysema and pneumomediastinum)

The Macklin effect describes one of the pathophysiological processes of pneumomediastinum in blunt chest trauma. The Macklin effect accounts for ~40% of severe blunt traumatic pneumomediastinum. Exclusion of tracheobronchial and oesophageal causes of pneumomediastinum is mandatory to exclude con...
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Macrocystic honeycombing

Macrocystic honeycombing refers to a morphological subtype of honeycombing. Many publications consider the individual lung cysts to be greater than 4 mm in diameter to be classified into this category.  This form is considered to be more commonly associated with UIP 3. See also honeycombing m...
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Major aortopulmonary collateral arteries

Major aortopulmonary collateral arteries (MAPCAs) are persistent tortuous fetal arteries that arise from the descending aorta and supply blood to pulmonary arteries in the lungs usually at the posterior aspect of hilum. Pathology Embryologically, the intersegmental arteries regress with the no...
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Malignant pleural disease

Malignant pleural disease usually heralds a poor prognosis, whether it represents a primary pleural malignancy or metastatic involvement.  Clinical presentation Clinical presentation is variable. Patients may be asymptomatic or have pleuritic pain. If associated with a sizeable pleural effusio...
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Malignant pleural mesothelioma (staging)

A number of staging systems have been described for staging of malignant pleural mesothelioma. Below is the International Mesothelioma Interest Group TNM staging system. TNM T - Tumour Tx: primary tumour cannot be assessed T0: no evidence of primary tumour T1a potentially resectable only ...
Article

Manubriosternal joint

The articulation between the upper two parts of the sternum, the manubrium and sternal body, is known as the manubriosternal joint.   It is at the level of the sternal angle or angle of Louis, which is at the 2nd costal cartilage and the intervertebral disc of T4 and T5 1.  This forms an importa...
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Marijuana lung

Marijuana (cannabis or bong) lung refers to the presence of large apical bullae in patients who regularly smoke marijuana. A definite causative link between smoking marijuana and bullous lung disease has not been established, and the association may just be coincidental.  Pathology Smoking mar...
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Masaoka staging system of thymoma

The Masaoka staging system is commonly adopted for thymomas 1-3, and is the most important determinant of survival following surgical resection 4: stage I: intact thymic capsule stage II: capsular invasion into adjacent mediastinal fat or pleura stage III: macroscopic invasion into adjacent o...
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Mastocytosis

Mastocytosis is a disorder of excessive mast cell proliferation, which is now classified as a myeloproliferative neoplasm. Two clinical entities fall under the mastocytosis umbrella: cutaneous (urticaria pigmentosa) and systemic mastocytosis (with or without cutaneous manifestations). The articl...
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Maximum intensity projection (MIP)

Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) consists of projecting the voxel with the highest attenuation value on every view throughout the volume onto a 2D image 1. Such an algorithm is rather simple: for each XY coordinate, only the pixel with the highest Hounsfield number along the Z-axis is represe...
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Mean pulmonary arterial pressure

Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) can be estimated by echocardiogram ultrasound study. It is calculated by the formula: (PASystolic pressure +2 PADiastolic pressure) / 3 Normal MPAP is less than 20 mmHg and considered elevated when it exceeds 25 mmHg at rest or 30 mmHg with exertion.  S...
Article

Meconium aspiration

Meconium aspiration occurs secondary to intrapartum or intrauterine aspiration of meconium, usually in the setting of fetal distress, and usually in term or post-term infants. Epidemiology Up to 10-15% of live births after 34 weeks can present with meconium stained fluid but only 1-5% of neona...
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Medial pneumothorax

Medial pneumothorax refers to the abnormal collection of air on medial aspect of the pleural cavity. This occurs when the quantity of air is small. Radiographic features Chest radiograph (supine) Seen as a linear lucent area along the medial aspect of lung at the interface of the pleural surf...
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Medial stripe sign

Medial stripe sign refers to an area of increased lucency at the interface of the medial lung and the mediastinum in case of medial pneumothorax. A small volume of pneumothorax generally accumulates anteriorly or medially which can be difficult to detect hence this sign holds a certain significa...
Article

Mediastinal haemangioma

Mediastinal haemangioma is a location specific subtype of a haemangioma. Epidemiology There incidence account for less than 0.5% among all mediastinal masses 1. Clinical presentation Up to half of patients may be asymptomatic 1. Others may present with non-specific symptoms, such as cough, c...
Article

Mediastinal lipomatosis

Mediastinal lipomatosis refers to a condition where there is a deposition of a large amount of mature adipose tissue in the mediastinum. It is a relatively common benign cause of mediastinal widening.   Pathology It is the result of increased deposition of normal unencapsulated fat 1.  Locati...
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Mediastinal lymphadenopathy in interstitial lung disease

Mediastinal lymphadenopathy associated with interstitial lung disease can be a frequent feature although its presence has limited value in the differential diagnosis. In certain forms of interstitial lung disease, the extent of lymph node enlargement may correlate to disease activity or progress...
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Mediastinal lymph node enlargement

Mediastinal lymph node enlargement can occur from a wide range of pathologies. It may occur on its own or in association with other lung pathology. Terminology Although mediastinal lymphadenopathy is used interchangeably - by some - with "mediastinal lymph node enlargement", they are not synon...
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Mediastinal lymphoma

Mediastinal lymphoma is common, either as part of disseminated disease or less commonly as the site of primary involvement. Epidemiology Lymphomas are responsible for approximately 15% of all primary mediastinal masses, and 45% of anterior mediastinal masses in children 1. Only 10% of lymphoma...
Article

Mediastinal mass

Mediastinal mass may be caused by a wide variety of neoplastic and non-neoplastic pathologies. It is helpful to identify the location of the mass since this significantly reduces the breadth of the differential diagnosis.  There are four conceptual compartments of the mediastinum which are larg...
Article

Mediastinal paraganglioma

Mediastinal paragangliomas are rare tumours derived from chromaffin cells (neuroectodermal cells) associated with sympathetic ganglion of the autonomic nervous system. They can arise from two major cluster of sympathetic ganglion cells: paraaortic (aorticopulmonary) and paravetebral (aorticosymp...
Article

Mediastinal pseudocyst

A mediastinal pseudocyst is the extension of pancreatic pseudocyst into the posterior mediastinum through oesophageal or aortic hiatus or rarely through the foramen of Morgagni. It is a rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Clinical presentation It can present with symptoms due t...
Article

Mediastinal teratoma

Mediastinal teratomas are germ cell tumours located in the anterior mediastinum. Epidemiology Mediastinal teratomas are the most common extra-gonadal germ cell tumours. They account for approximately 15% of anterior mediastinal masses in adults and approximately 25% of anterior mediastinal mas...
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Mediastinal widening (differential)

The differential diagnoses for mediastinal widening include: traumatic aortic injury vascular anomalies unfolded aorta double SVC aberrant right subclavian artery azygous continuation of the IVC pneumomediastinum lung atelectasis pulmonary masses abutting the mediastinum mediastinal l...
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Mediastinum

The mediastinum is a space in the thorax that contains a group of non-delineated organs and their surrounding connective tissue. It lies in the midline of the chest between the pleura of each lung and extends from the sternum to the vertebral column.  Gross anatomy The mediastinum contains all...
Article

Mediastinum (ITMIG classification)

The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group (ITMIG) classification of mediastinal compartments was developed to reflect a division of the mediastinum based on cross-sectional imaging. It was in part an effort to consolidate prior discrepant classification systems in use by different medic...
Article

Medical devices in the thorax

Medical devices in the thorax are regularly observed by radiologists when reviewing radiographs and CTs. Extrathoracic devices tubing, clamps, syringes lying on or under the patient rubber sheets, foam mattresses, clothing, hair braids, nipple piercings etc. may also be visible These devices...
Article

Mega oesophagus

Mega oesophagus or diffuse oesophageal dilatation can be caused by a variety of conditions.  Pathology Aetiology Some of the more common causes are given below 1-3: oesophageal dysmotility achalasia Chagas disease scleroderma distal obstruction malignant stricture, e.g. oesophageal canc...
Article

Melioidosis

Melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (previously known as Pseudomonas pseudomallei) and is a multisystem disorder which may affect the lungs, brain, visceral organs, or musculoskeletal system. Epidemiology Melioidosis is a disease of the monsoon season in th...
Article

Melting ice cube sign (lungs)

The melting ice cube sign describes the resolution of pulmonary haemorrhage following pulmonary embolism (PE).  When there is pulmonary haemorrhage without infarction following PE, the typical wedge-shaped, pleural-based opacification (Hampton's hump) resolves within a week while preserving its...
Article

Mendelson syndrome

Mendelson syndrome or peptic pneumonia refers to acute chemical pneumonitis caused by the aspiration of stomach contents in patients under general anesthesia. Pathology The etiologic agents is believed to be aspiration of acidic stomach contents, other compounds, e.g. bile, may also play a rol...
Article

Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall

A mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall is a very rare benign chest wall tumour. It is sometimes classified as a non-neoplastic developmental anomaly rather than a tumour. Epidemiology They typically present in neonates or infants 1-3. Clinical presentation Many present with a chest wall m...
Article

Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma, in general, is an aggressive malignant tumour of the mesothelium. The overwhelming majority arise from the pleura, pleural mesothelioma, which this article will focus on. Given the presence of the mesothelium in different parts of the body, mesothelioma can arise in various locati...
Article

Mesothelioma (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists. Pleural mesotheliomas are malignant tumours of the lining of the lungs. There is a strong association with asbestos exposure. Reference article This is a summary article; read more in our article on mesothelioma. Summar...
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Metastases to the thymus

Metastases to the thymus are rare, although they are probably under reported due to lack of symptoms.  Pathology Varied primary tumours have been reported to metastasise to the thymus 1,2: breast cancer lung cancer ovarian cancer colorectal carcinoma gastric cancer prostate cancer testi...
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Metastatic axillary lymphadenopathy of unknown primary

Metastatic axillary lymphadenopathy of unknown primary can be a very chellanging situation.  Pathology Usual potential sites include: occult breast cancer: the incidence of an axillary lymph node manifestation from an occult primary breast cancer is low, ranging from 0.3-0.8% of all patients ...
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Metastatic pulmonary calcification

Metastatic pulmonary calcification (MPC) is a form of pulmonary calcification where there is calcium deposition in normal lung pulmonary parenchyma.  Pathology Causes It can occur in a variety of benign and malignant disorders such as: chronic renal failure: considered commonest cause 5 pri...
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Methotrexate lung disease

Methotrexate lung disease is the specific aetiological type of drug-induced lung disease. It can occur due to the administration of methotrexate which is an antimetabolite, which is given for various reasons but commonly to treat rheumatoid arthritis. It is also given alone or in combination wit...
Article

Mickey Mouse appearance

In medical imaging literature, a Mickey Mouse appearance has been given to imaging features that depict that of Mickey Mouse when viewed from the front. It has been described in the following: anencephaly 2 progressive supranuclear palsy 1 synonymously with a finger in glove sign the flared ...
Article

Microcystic honeycombing

Microcystic honeycombing is an imaging descriptor on thoracic HRCT/CT  which is typically given to denote extremely small cysts typically occurring in a subpleural location on a background of interstitial lung disease. It is typically described in association with non-specific interstitial pneum...
Article

Microlithiasis

Microlithiasis merely means very small stones and may refer to: testicular microlithiasis alveolar microlithiasis calyceal microlithiasis
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Microscopic polyangiitis

Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) is small vessel non-granulomatous necrotising vasculitis. It most often affects venules, capillaries, arterioles, and small arteries, although it occasionally involves medium-sized arteries 9. Epidemiology It typically affects middle aged individuals. Distributi...
Article

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection is an uncommon viral infection (<1000 cases) with the first case reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. It most commonly causes pneumonia and acute renal failure with a mortality rate of ~40%. MERS-CoV raises concern because of its sim...
Article

Middle lobe bronchiectasis

Distribution of bronchiectasis can help in narrowing the differential diagnosis. Middle lobe bronchiectasis is typically seen in: non tuberculous mycobacterial infections MAIC middle lobe syndrome in children See also central bronchiectasis upper lobe bronchiectasis lower...
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Middle mediastinal mass

The differential diagnosis for a middle mediastinal mass includes 1-3: lymphadenopathy aneurysm, e.g. aortic, pulmonary artery, bronchial artery congenital cyst pericardial cyst foregut duplications cyst (e.g. oesophageal, bronchial) pericardial tumour primary/secondary cardiac tumour ne...
Article

Middle mediastinum

The middle mediastinum is an artificial space of the mediastinum divided from the remainder of the extra-pleural intrathoracic cavity by arbitrary lines. It forms the largest component of the inferior mediastinum.  Gross anatomy Relations superiorly: superior mediastinum, divided by the thora...
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Mid zone

The mid (or middle) zone is one of the four chest radiograph zones.  Radiographic appearance Plain radiograph on frontal chest radiographs, extends between the superior and inferior aspects of the hilum
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Migrating pericardial cyst

Migrating pericardial cysts or wandering pericardial cysts are an unusual form of pericardial cysts. They are usually pedunculated and change in position on serial imaging but have all other imaging characteristics supportive of a pericardial or pleuro-pericardial cyst.
Article

Miliary nodules in the exam

Getting a film with miliary nodules in the exam is one of the many exam set-pieces that can be prepared for. The film goes up and after a couple of seconds pause, you need to start talking: Chest radiograph There are multiple tiny soft-tissue density nodules present throughout both lungs with...
Article

Miliary opacities (lungs)

The term miliary opacities refers to innumerable, small 1-4 mm pulmonary nodules scattered throughout the lungs. It is useful to divide these patients into those who are febrile and those who are not. Additionally, some miliary opacities are very dense, narrowing the differential - see multiple...
Article

Miliary sarcoidosis

Miliary sarcoidosis is a rare thoracic manifesation of sarcoidosis where there are numerous miliary-like nodules scattered throughout the lungs. It is thought to represent less than 1% of cases.  Epidemiology From the limited case reports available, there is some suggestion that this form may ...
Article

Miliary tuberculosis

Miliary tuberculosis is an uncommon pulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis. It represents haematogeneous dissemination of uncontrolled tuberculous infection and carries a relatively poor prognosis. It is seen both in primary and post-primary tuberculosis and may be associated with tuberculous ...
Article

Minimal aortic injury

Minimal aortic injuries are traumatic aortic lesions that usually involve the intima and are recognised more frequently due to the use of high-resolution imaging. Epidemiology Minimal aortic injuries account for 10-28% of all blunt traumatic aortic injuries 1,6,7. The proportion of this type o...
Article

Minimally invasive adenocarcinoma of the lung

Minimally invasive adenocarcinoma of the lung is a relatively new category in the classification for adenocarcinoma of the lung. Lesions that fall into this category refer to small solitary adenocarcinomas <3 cm with either pure lepidic growth or predominant lepidic growth with ≤5 mm of stromal ...
Article

Minimum intensity projection (MinIP)

Minimum intensity projection (MinIP) is a data visualization method that enables detection of low-density structures in a given volume. The algorithm uses all the data in a volume of interest to generate a single bidimensional image, in other words, its consists of projecting the voxel with the ...
Article

Misplaced endotracheal tube

A misplaced or malpositioned endotracheal tube is a relatively common complication that is detected on post-intubation radiographs. Complications if the ETT is too high it can rub against the vocal cords and cause cord trauma if the ETT is too low it can selectively intubate the right or left...
Article

Mitral annular calcification

Mitral annular calcification (MAC) refers to deposition of calcium (along with lipid) in the annular fibrosa of the mitral valve. Epidemiology Annular calcification is seen in up to 35% of elderly patients. It is common in females over 65 years, in those with myxtomatous degeneration of the mi...
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Mixed connective tissue disease

Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a type of connective tissue disease. With regards to clinical and imaging features, it can have significant overlap with other connective tissue disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma 1. It therefore classified as a type of overlap ...
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Mixed connective tissue disease (pulmonary manifestations)

Pulmonary manifestations of mixed connective tissue disease can be seen in a wide range (20-85%) of those of mixed connective tissue disease. It can have multiple manifestations.  More commonly described features include: an interstitial pneumonitis: 20-65% pulmonary fibrosis: 20-65% pulmona...
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Mixed dust pneumoconiosis

Mixed dust pneumoconiosis (MDP) is classified as a type of pneumoconiosis. It is sometimes classified pathologically as a pneumoconiosis showing dust macules or mixed-dust fibrotic nodules, with or without silicotic nodules, in an individual with a history of exposure to mixed dust 2.
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Modified PIOPED criteria for diagnosis of pulmonary embolus

The modified PIOPED criteria for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolus (PE) determine the probability of pulmonary emboli following a VQ scan. Classification High probability two or more large mismatched segmental defects or equivalent moderate/large defects with a normal x-ray any perfusion de...
Article

Moguls of the heart

The 'moguls of the heart' refer to the bulges of the cardiomediastinal contour on frontal chest radiographs. The cardiomediastinal bulges are likened to skiing moguls (bumps of packed snow on a mountainside sculptured by turning skis). Awareness of their usual locations and aetiologies is helpfu...
Article

Monod sign (lungs)

Monod sign (often misspelt Monad sign) simply describes gas that surrounds a mycetoma (most commonly an aspergilloma) in a pre-existing pulmonary cavity 1-3. It should not be confused with the air crescent sign which is seen in recovering angioinvasive aspergillosis 4. The air crescent sign her...
Article

More black sign

The more black sign is a normal finding in lateral chest x-ray, and refers to the gradual increased apparent radiolucency (blackness) of the vertebral bodies, when proceeding from upper to lower chest. This is due to the increased proportion of the chest comprised of air containing lungs over di...
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Mosaic attenuation pattern in lung

Mosaic attenuation is a descriptive term used in describing a patchwork of regions of differing pulmonary attenuation on CT imaging.  It is a non-specific finding, although is associated with the following: obstructive small airways disease: low attenuation regions are abnormal and reflect decr...
Article

Mounier-Kuhn syndrome

Mounier-Kuhn syndrome is a somewhat controversial entity and used synonymously with tracheobronchomegaly by most authors 7,8,9.  Epidemiology Mounier-Kuhn syndrome is most frequently seen in middle age men before the age of 50 1,6. Clinical presentation The anatomical and physiological chang...
Article

Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of lung

Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) of the lung is a type of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is classified under the group of lung carcinomas of the salivary gland type. Epidemiology Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) is the most common of the SGTTLs 9. The tumour is thought to account for ~ 0.2...
Article

Mucoid impaction (lung)

Mucoid impaction, also referred to as mucus plugging or bronchocele, airway filling by mucoid secretions and can be obstructive or non-obstructive. It is a common pathological finding in chest imaging. Pathology Aetiology Mucoid impaction may result from either obstructive or non-obstructive ...
Article

Multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia

Multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia (MMPH) is a rare benign hamartomatous proliferation of type II pneumocytes and is seen in association with tuberous sclerosis (TS). It can occur with or without concurrent lymphangiomyomatosis. Radiographic features HRCT / Contrast CT Chest Seen ...
Article

Multilobar pneumonia

Multilobar pneumonia, as the name suggests, is a lobar pneumonia affecting multiple lobes. Patients with community acquired multilobar pneumonia have a worse prognosis with longer admissions, more need for ventilatory support and more frequent treatment failure 1. 
Article

Multinodular goitre

Multinodular goitre (commonly abbreviated to MNG) is defined as an enlarged thyroid gland (i.e. goitre) due to multiple nodules which may have normal, decreased or increased function.  Terminology When increased activity and hyperthyroidism are present then the condition is referred to a toxic...
Article

Musculophrenic artery

The musculophrenic artery is one of two terminal branches of the internal thoracic artery. Gross anatomy The musculophrenic artery runs along the costal slips of the diaphragm. It supplies the 7th, 8th and 9th intercostal spaces with paired anterior intercostal arteries, as well as fine branch...
Article

Myasthenia gravis

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common neuromuscular junction disease and presents with increasing fatigue brought on by exertion.  Epidemiology Incidence is estimated at 15-20 per 100,000 1,2. Females are more affected (3:1) under the age of 40, but males are more affected by the age of 50...
Article

Mycetoma

Mycetoma refers to a chronic and progressively destructive granulomatous disease. The defining clinical triad comprises: localised mass-like soft tissue injury with  draining sinuses, that  discharge grains of contagious material It is one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases defined by WHO...
Article

Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a thin, slightly curved bacillus. A member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, it is an obligate aerobic bacterium that is the aetiologic agent of the majority of tuberculosis cases.  Epidemiology The worldwide incidence of tuberculosis was 8.7 million in 2...
Article

Mycoplasma pneumonia

Mycoplasma pneumonia is a type of community-acquired pneumonia caused by the organism Mycoplasma pneumoniae. It is usually grouped under an atypical pneumonia. Epidemiology It is relatively common in the paediatric population where it is considered the most common community-acquired pneumonia ...
Article

Mycosis fungoides

Mycosis fungoides (MF), also known as cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, is a type of malignant T-cell lymphoma that primarily involves the skin.  Epidemiology In the United States, it is more common in males and African Americans. In Europe, it accounts for ~6% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. It is rar...
Article

Naclerio V sign

The Naclerio V sign is a sign described on the plain film in patients with a pneumomediastinum occurring often secondary to an oesophageal rupture.  It is seen as a V-shaped air collection. One limb of the V is produced by mediastinal gas outlining the left lower lateral mediastinal border. The...
Article

Nasogastric tube position on chest x-ray (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists   Nasogastric (NG) tube position on chest x-ray should be assessed following initial placement and on subsequent radiographs. Reference article This is a summary article; we have a more in-depth reference article NGT. S...
Article

Near drowning pulmonary oedema

Near drowning pulmonary oedema is considered an aetiological subtype of non cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. It can occur with both salt water and fresh water near-drowning. Pathology It is thought to result from the inhalation of either fresh water or sea water resulting in lung damage and a ven...
Article

Necrobiotic pulmonary nodules

Necrobiotic pulmonary nodules are sterile cavitating lung nodules associated with inflammatory bowel disease (more often with ulcerative colitis than Crohn disease) and rheumatoid arthritis.  Pathology Histologically, necrobiotic nodules consist of a core of fibrinoid necrosis and sterile aggr...
Article

Necrotising pneumonia

Necrotising pneumonia refers to pneumonia characterised by the development of the necrosis within infected lung tissue. Terminology While the term has sometimes been used synonymously with cavitating pneumonia in some publications 2, not all necrotising pulmonary infections may be complicated ...
Article

Necrotising sarcoid granulomatosis

Necrotising sarcoid granulomatosis (NSG) is a rare systemic disease, characterised by sarcoid-like granuloma formation, vasculitis and variable degrees of necrosis. It is sometimes classified under the group of pulmonary angiitis and granulomatois. Epidemiology It typically affects middle-aged...
Article

Neonatal chest radiograph in the exam setting

The neonatal chest radiograph in the exam setting may strike fear into the heart of many radiology registrars, but it need not! There are only a limited number of diagnoses that will be presented on such films and they are often highlighted by the history. Gestation First of all, have a look ...
Article

Neonatal lines and tubes

Neonatal lines and tubes are widely used in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) in the management of critically ill neonates. Examples include: nasogastric (NG) tube endotracheal (ET) tube central venous line umbilical artery catheter umbilical vein catheter Nasogastric tube The NG tu...
Article

Neonatal pneumonia

Neonatal pneumonia refers to inflammatory changes of the respiratory system caused by neonatal infection. Epidemiology It is one of the leading causes of significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Neonatal pneumonia accounts for 10% of global child mortality. At the time of w...
Article

Neonatal pneumothorax

Neonatal pneumothorax describes pneumothoraces occurring in neonates. It is a life threatening condition, associated with high morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis is a challenge especially when the amount of air is small and may accumulate along the anterior or medial pleural space. Epidemio...
Article

Neonatal respiratory distress (causes)

Causes of neonatal distress can be broadly split into intrathoracic, extrathoracic and systemic: Intrathoracic Medical respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN) meconium aspiration syndrome bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) patent ductus arteriosus (PDA)...
Article

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (thoracic manifestations)

Thoracic manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), or von Recklinghausen disease, are related to pulmonary and mediastinal features of this multisystem neurocutaneous disorder, which is the most common phakomatosis. For thoracic manifestations involving the skeleton, such as focal thora...

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