Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

1,195 results found
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Inferior mesenteric artery

The inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) is one of the three non-paired major visceral arteries in the abdominal cavity arising from the abdominal aorta and supplying the hindgut. It is the smallest of the three anterior visceral branches of the abdominal aorta. Gross anatomy Location Located wit...
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Inferior mesenteric vein

The inferior mesenteric vein drains blood from the distal portion of the colon as well as the rectum (i.e. the hindgut).  Gross anatomy Origin and course The inferior mesenteric vein drains the mesenteric arcade of the hindgut (comprising of distal transverse, descending, and sigmoid colon). ...
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Inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery

The inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery is the first branch of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), though it often arises from the first jejunal branch. It anastomoses with branches of the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery (from the gastroduodenal artery) and it supplies the head of the pan...
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Inferior thoracic aperture

The inferior thoracic aperture connects the thorax with the abdomen. Gross anatomy The inferior thoracic aperture is irregular in shape and is more oblique and much larger than the superior thoracic aperture. The diaphragm occupies and closes the inferior thoracic aperture, thereby separating ...
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Inflammatory bowel disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), although occasionally used to encompass a variety of infective and purely inflammatory bowel conditions, usually refers to two idiopathic conditions Crohn disease ulcerative colitis Indeterminate colitis is added to the list, and represents approximately 6% o...
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Inflammatory bowel disease (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Inflammatory bowel disease is a generic term used to describe diseases of the GI tract that have an inflammatory cause. Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the commonest causes of inflammatory bowel disease. ...
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Inflammatory bowel disease (thoracic manifestations)

Thoracic manifestations of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease can be variable and cannot be used to differentiate between these entities. They can develop at any time with respect to the clinical onset of the underlying disease. Actually, they can also predate the colonic disease or deve...
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Inflammatory pseudopolyp

An inflammatory pseudopolyp is an island of normal colonic mucosa which only appears raised because it is surrounded by atrophic tissue (denuded ulcerative mucosa). It is seen in long-standing ulcerative colitis. It must be distinguished from inflammatory polyps, which are regions of inflamed a...
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Inframesocolic space

The inframesocolic space is the peritoneal space below the root of the transverse mesocolon. The supramesocolic space lies above the transverse mesocolon's root. Gross anatomy The compartment can be divided into two unequal spaces posteriorly by the mesentery of the small bowel as it runs from...
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Ingested bones

Ingested bones that become lodged in the throat or gastrointestinal tract are a common presentation to the emergency department. Recognition is important because these cases can be potentially fatal.  Clinical presentation Fish bones are more commonly ingested than chicken or pork bones. Patie...
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Ingested foreign bodies in children

Ingested foreign bodies in children are common as the world is a curious place to young children, who will put anything and everything into their mouth, and will often inadvertently swallow.  The usual practice is for plain films of the chest and/or abdomen to identify a foreign body. Epidemio...
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Inguinal canal

The inguinal canal is a passage in the anterior abdominal wall that transmits structures from the pelvis to the perineum formed by the fetal migration of the gonad from the abdomen into the labioscrotal folds. Gross anatomy The inguinal canal has an oblique course, is 4 cm in length and has tw...
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Inguinal canal lipoma

Inguinal canal lipomas, also known as spermatic cord or round ligament lipomas, are a relatively common but often under-recognized finding on imaging. Clinical presentation Lipomas are usually asymptomatic but can sometimes cause pain and discomfort. They can present as a mass lesion.  Pathol...
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Inguinal hernia

Inguinal hernia is a type of abdominal wall hernia 1. Epidemiology They are the commonest type of abdominal wall herniation (up to 80% 3) and are most often acquired. There is a recognized male predilection with an M:F ratio of up to 7:1 3. Clinical presentation Patients most commonly presen...
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Insulinoma

Insulinomas are the most common sporadic endocrine tumor of the pancreas. On imaging, they usually present as small well-defined hypervascular tumors that may be found anywhere along the pancreas.  Epidemiology Account for 40% of syndromic pancreatic endocrine tumors. The overall incidence is...
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Internal hernia

Internal hernias are protrusions of the viscera through the peritoneum or mesentery but remaining within the abdominal cavity. Epidemiology Internal hernias have a low incidence of <1% and represent a relatively small amount of presentations, of ~5% 1. Clinical presentation The most common p...
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Internal hernias due to gastric bypass surgery

Internal hernias due to gastric bypass surgery are more common after laparoscopic gastric bypass than after an open procedure.  Clinical presentation It is a particularly sinister complication with variable, non-specific clinical presentations. Most patients report a combination of postprandia...
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Internal iliac lymph nodes

The internal iliac lymph nodes (often shortened to internal iliac nodes) are the lymph nodes found adjacent to the internal iliac artery and its branches and drain the regions supplied by these vessels. This encompasses a large area from the genitalia anteriorly, the psoas muscle posteriorly and...
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Internal oblique muscle

The internal oblique muscle (IOM) is one of the muscles that form the anterior abdominal wall. Inferiorly, it contributes towards the formation of the inguinal ligament. Summary origin: originates along the whole length of the lumbar fascia, from the anterior two-thirds of the iliac crest and ...
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Interstitial edematous pancreatitis

Interstitial edematous pancreatitis is one of the two subtypes of acute pancreatitis. It is normally referred to as "acute pancreatitis" or "uncomplicated pancreatitis" in day-to-day use. Please refer to the article on acute pancreatitis for further details. 
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Intestinal angioedema

Intestinal angioedema is edema into the submucosal space of the bowel wall following protein extravasation from "leaky" vessels. It can affect both the small and large bowel. Clinical presentation Patients often present with non-specific findings of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Patho...
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Intestinal failure

Intestinal failure is when a patient's native bowel is unable to digest and absorb the food, electrolytes, and fluids needed for normal growth and development.  Clinical presentation This often includes intractable diarrhea, weight loss, dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and malnutrition. P...
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Intestinal ischemia

Intestinal ischemia refers to vascular compromise of the bowel which in the acute setting has a very high mortality if not treated expediently. Diagnosis is often straightforward, provided appropriate imaging is obtained and sometimes subtle findings sought out. The disease can be arbitrarily cl...
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Intestinal ischemia (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Intestinal ischemia refers to vascular compromise of the bowel which in the acute setting has a very high mortality if not treated expediently. Diagnosis is often straight forward provided appropriate imaging is obtained. T...
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Intestinal lymphangiectasia

Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a condition characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine. This can result in hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia.  Epidemio...
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Intestinal malrotation

Intestinal malrotation is a congenital anatomical anomaly that results from an abnormal rotation of the gut as it returns to the abdominal cavity during embryogenesis. Although some individuals live their entire life with malrotated bowel without symptoms, the abnormality does predispose to mid...
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Intestinal nonrotation

Intestinal nonrotation is a congenital anomaly of the intestines that results in the small bowel occupying the right side of the peritoneal cavity and the colon predominantly on the left. It is sometimes thought of as a subtype of intestinal malrotation. Epidemiology Nonrotation is estimated ...
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Intestinal transplant

Intestinal transplantation is a surgical treatment for intestinal failure. It is one of the most rarely performed transplant procedures performed, exclusively involving the transplantation of donor small bowel to a recipient, with an ileostomy formation.  Due to the high risk of complications w...
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Intestinal volvulus

Intestinal volvulus is a broad term that describes the torsion of bowel around its mesentery. Torsion results in narrowing of the lumen at the point of rotation and compromise of the vessels that supply the torted gut.  In order for a vessel to be compressed and obstructed, the force that the t...
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Intra-abdominal calcification

Intra-abdominal calcification is common and the causes may be classified into four broad groups based on morphology: Concretions These are discrete precipitates in a vessel or organ. They are sharp in outline but the density and shape vary but in some cases they may be virtually pathognomonic:...
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Intra-abdominal calcification (neonatal)

Intra-abdominal calcification in a neonate can be caused by a number of pathologies that cause calcification within the peritoneal space or within organs. Pathology Etiology Meconium peritonitis The commonest cause is meconium peritonitis which is the result of aseptic peritonitis secondary ...
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Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms or tumors (IPMNs or IMPTs) are epithelial pancreatic cystic tumors of mucin-producing cells that arise from the pancreatic ducts. They are most commonly seen in elderly patients.  On imaging, particularly MRCP, they are characterized by single or multipl...
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Intramural bowel gas

Intramural bowel gas, also known as pneumatosis intestinalis, refers to the clinical or radiological finding of gas within the wall of the bowel. Terminology There are different terminologies in the medical literature, such as pneumatosis intestinalis, pneumatosis coli, and pneumatosis cystoid...
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Intraperitoneal focal fat infarction

Intraperitoneal focal fat infarction (IFFI) refers to a group of self-limiting abdominal diseases where the primary insult is acute inflammation of intraperitoneal fat. They commonly mimic the more common causes of acute abdomen such as acute diverticulitis and acute appendicitis. The group incl...
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Intussusception

Intussusception occurs when one segment of bowel is pulled into itself or a neighboring loop of the bowel by peristalsis. It is an important cause of an acute abdomen in children and merits timely ultrasound examination and reduction to preclude significant sequelae including bowel necrosis. Whe...
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Inverted "V" sign (pneumoperitoneum)

The inverted "V" sign, also known as the lateral umbilical ligament sign, is a sign of pneumoperitoneum manifested by the visualization of an inverted "V"  shape in the pelvis on supine view of abdominal radiographs. It represent free gas outlining the lateral umbilical ligaments. In infants, th...
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Investigating abdominal pain (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Investigating abdominal pain is a common request from clinical teams throughout most hospitals. Causes of abdominal pain are vast and as such, appropriate history and examination are necessary to initiate appropriate initia...
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Investigating jaundice (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Investigation of jaundice is heavily reliant on radiology, from the simplest of investigations (the ultrasound) through to much more complicated MRI-based test and intervention. It is important to determine whether jaundic...
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Investigating nausea and vomiting (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Nausea and vomiting (often abbreviated in medical notes to N&V) are non-specific physical manifestations of disease. They may occur together, or in isolation and may be the result of obstructive pathology or as a general ma...
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Investigating PR bleeding (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Investigating PR bleeding radiologically may help to make a diagnosis or give more information after a diagnosis has been established. Radiology should not replace appropriate physical examination or appropriate use of sigm...
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Irish node

An Irish node is an enlarged axillary lymph node, often associated with advanced gastric cancer1.
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Iron deficiency anemia

Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and a common precipitant to radiological investigation. Epidemiology Amongst men and postmenopausal women, the incidence in the developed world is around 2%. Among premenopausal women, the incidence is greater and in most cases, investigation ...
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Irritable bowel syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the commonest of the functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Its key presenting features are recurrent abdominal pain and change in bowel habit (diarrhea and/or constipation), which may be severe, such that for an individual, there may be a marked negativ...
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Ischemic colitis

Ischemic colitis refers to inflammation of the colon secondary to vascular insufficiency and ischemia. It is sometimes considered under the same spectrum as intestinal ischemia. The severity and consequences of the disease are highly variable. Epidemiology Ischemic bowel is typically a disease...
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Ischioanal fossa

The ischioanal (or ischiorectal) fossa is a fat-filled space of the perineum.  Gross anatomy The ischioanal fossa is a paired triangular-shaped space lateral to the anal canal with an apex directed anteromedially towards the pubic symphysis. Each ischioanal fossa is separated from the other by...
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Ishikawa classification of venous involvement by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ishikawa classification system describes the degree of involvement of adjacent portal vein and SMV by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma based on caliber of the vein: type I: normal  type II: smooth shift/displacement with normal caliber   type III: unilateral narrowing  type IV: bilateral nar...
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Isolated free fluid in trauma

Isolated free fluid in trauma may or may not represent a significant injury, and this creates a diagnostic dilemma in determining appropriate treatment for these patients.  Epidemiology The presence of isolated free fluid in trauma occurs in 3-5% of blunt trauma patients 1-4. Pathology The c...
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Isthmus (disambiguation)

Isthmus (plural isthmi) is an anatomical term and refers to a slender structure joining two larger components. Some of these uses of the word isthmus are now rarely used or only seen in older texts and articles: isthmus (aorta) isthmus (auditory tube) isthmus (auricle of the ear) isthmus (ci...
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Ivor Lewis procedure

Ivor Lewis procedure (also known as a gastric pull-up) is a type of esophagectomy, an upper gastrointestinal tract operation performed for mid and distal esophageal pathology, usually esophageal cancer. Due to the necessity of removing a significant length of the esophagus, the stomach is "pull...
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Jejunal and ileal branches of the superior mesenteric artery

The jejunal and ileal branches of the superior mesenteric artery are variable in number. They pass in the two layers of the mesentery to the jejunum and ileum and progressively divide and join in a series of anastomosing arcades. From the arcades, straight arteries (also known as the vasa recta...
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Jejunal atresia

Jejunal atresia is a congenital anomaly characterized by obliteration of the lumen of the jejunum. The site of the atresia can be anywhere from the ligament of Treitz to the jejunoileal junction. There can be more than one atretic segment. This article will focus on jejunal atresia alone but be...
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Jejunocolic bypass

Jejunocolic bypass was an early form of bariatric surgery. It is no longer performed due to severe side effects. For this bypass, the proximal small bowel (jejunum) is transected and anastomosed to the colon (such as the transverse colon). The other end of the small bowel is closed and the dist...
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Jejunoileal bypass

Jejunoileal bypass is an older form of bariatric surgery that was developed to be an improvement on jejunocolic bypass. It is no longer performed due to severe side effects. For this bypass, the proximal small bowel (jejunum) is divided ~35 cm past the ligament of Treitz, and the proximal end i...
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Jejunoileal diverticula

Jejunoileal diverticula, also referred to as jejunal diverticula or diverticulosis as most of the diverticula are located in the jejunum, are outpouchings from the jejunal and ileal wall on their mesenteric border that represent mucosal herniation through sites of wall weakening 1. Jejunoileal ...
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Jejunoileal diverticulitis

Jejunoileal diverticulitis (plural diverticulitides), an acute inflammation of diverticula of the jejunum or ileum is much rarer than colonic diverticulitis. Epidemiology The jejunum is a more common site of acquired diverticula of the small bowel than the ileum 1. Clinical presentation Dive...
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Jejunoileal fold pattern reversal

Jejunoileal fold pattern reversal (a.k.a. jejunisation of the ileum) is one of the signs of celiac disease, and is seen on small bowel follow-through studies as well as CT. The pattern is one of increased number of ileal folds and reduced number of jejunal folds 1,2, and is considered positive w...
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Jejunum

The jejunum is arbitrarily defined as the proximal two-fifths of the small intestine and is, on average, about 3 m in length. Gross anatomy Compared to the ileum, the jejunum has more valvulae conniventes and fewer folds per unit length. Like the ileum, the normal jejunal wall thickness is les...
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Jejunum vs ileum

There are a few differences that can help differentiate jejunum and ileum 1-3: location jejunum: upper left part of the peritoneal cavity ileum: lower right part of the peritoneal cavity gross appearance jejunum: greater caliber (<3 cm), thicker walls and more vascular  ileum: lesser calib...
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Juvenile polyposis syndrome

Juvenile polyposis syndrome, also referred as familial juvenile polyposis, is one of the polyposis syndromes and consists of hundreds of juvenile polyps. Epidemiology Presentation in the second decade is most common 2. Clinical presentation Rectal bleeding, bowel obstruction and intussuscept...
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Kikuchi level

The Kikuchi level is a histopathological term used for describing the degree of infiltration of a sessile early invasive colorectal cancer1. Preoperative assessment of the level of invasion using this classification may decrease the incidence of unnecessary surgery for sessile polyps.  Levels o...
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Killian-Jamieson diverticulum

Killian-Jamieson diverticula are esophageal diverticula. Like the more common Zenker diverticulum, it is a false diverticulum and represents an outpouching of mucosa through a muscular defect (in this case the Killian-Jamieson space 2).  Pathology They are located just below the cricopharyngea...
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Kirklin complex

The Kirklin complex is a combination of the Carman meniscus sign associated with a radiolucent semicircular zone surrounding the elevated ridge of the ulcer. This complex is seen in cases of gastric adenocarcinoma on barium studies. History and etymology Byrl Raymond Kirklin, (1888-1957 2) an ...
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Kirklin sign

The Kirklin sign refers to a deformity of the normal gastric bubble on an upright chest radiograph due to a mass lesion of the gastric cardia or fundus. The Kirklin sign is different from the Kirklin complex, a gastric finding on upper GI fluoroscopy. History and etymology Byrl Raymond Kirkli...
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Kommerell diverticulum

Kommerell diverticula occur in some anomalies of the aortic arch system. It usually refers to the bulbous configuration of the origin of an aberrant left subclavian artery in the setting of a right-sided aortic arch. However, it was originally described as a diverticular outpouching at the origi...
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KRAS mutation

KRAS (shortened name for the gene Kirsten RAt Sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) mutations are associated in a number of malignancies including:  certain adenocarcinomas of the lung colorectal carcinoma 1 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma Several germline KRAS mutations have also been found to b...
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Krenning score of neuroendocrine tumor uptake

The Krenning score is a proposed semi-quantitative method of assessing the degree of tracer uptake on octreotide scintigraphy. Parameters Initially designed for assessment of 111In-DTPA on planar imaging, the Krenning score is applicable to SPECT or SPECT/CT using various radiopharmaceuticals....
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Kwashiorkor

Kwashiorkor is a condition characterized by bilateral edema caused by protein deficiency. Epidemiology The largest population at risk for the condition are children who have begun weaning from breast milk or formula towards diets without sufficient protein. Therefore, kwashiorkor often affects...
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Labeled imaging anatomy cases

This article lists a series of labeled imaging anatomy cases by system and modality. Brain CT head: non-contrast axial CT head: non-contrast coronal CT head: non-contrast sagittal CT head: angiogram axial CT head: angiogram coronal CT head: angiogram sagittal CT head: venogram axial CT ...
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Ladd bands

Ladd bands are the most commonly encountered form of peritoneal bands in disarrangement of intestines, e.g. intestinal malrotation. Pathology Classically they extend from the abnormally positioned cecum to peritoneum and liver, crossing the duodenum in their course. Extension, however, can inc...
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Lane-Hamilton syndrome

Lane-Hamilton syndrome (LHS) refers to the rare concurrent association of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis and celiac disease 1. Epidemiology It is typically seen in children under the age of 15 but can occasionally be seen in adults. History and etymology It was originally described by D ...
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Langerhans cell histiocytosis

Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare multisystem disease with a wide and heterogeneous clinical spectrum and variable extent of involvement.  Terminology Langerhans cell histiocytosis was previously known as histiocytosis X. The newer term is preferred as it's more descriptive of its ...
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Lanthanum therapy

Lanthanum therapy is used to treat hyperphosphatemia in end-stage renal disease 1. It is taken as oral tablets (usually in the chemical form Lanthanum carbonate) which dissociate in the acidic environment of the stomach. The released trivalent Lanthanum cation has a high affinity for dietary pho...
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Large bowel lymphoma

Large bowel (colorectal) lymphoma is a very rare tumor, accounting for <0.5% of primary colorectal malignancies, ~1.5% of all lymphomas, and ~15% of gastrointestinal lymphoma. Large bowel lymphoma differs from gastric and small bowel lymphoma in clinical presentation, management and prognosis.  ...
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Large bowel obstruction

Large bowel obstruction (LBO) is often impressive on imaging, on account of the ability of the large bowel to massively distend. This condition requires prompt diagnosis and treatment.  Epidemiology Large bowel obstructions are far less common than small bowel obstructions, accounting for only...
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Large bowel obstruction (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Large bowel obstruction (LBO) occurs when there is mechanical obstruction of the large bowel and is often impressive on imaging on account of the ability of the large bowel to massively distend. This condition requires prom...
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Large intestine

The large intestine (or large bowel) is a 1.5 meter muscular tube that extends from the cecum to the rectum. It has three outer longitudinal muscular layers called taenia coli, which are about 30 cm shorter than the length of the large bowel causing characteristic sacculations interrupted by inc...
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Lateral crescent sign (inguinal hernia)

The lateral crescent sign is a useful diagnostic sign of a direct inguinal hernia on CT scan, the hernia causing compression and lateral displacement of the inguinal canal contents (ductus deferens, testicular vessels, fat, etc.) to form a semicircle of tissue that resembles a moon crescent seen...
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Lateral fossa

The lateral fossae are concave depressions of peritoneum in the paravesical space that lie between the lateral umbilical folds and the lateral parietal peritoneum. The lateral fossae are the smallest of the anterior paravesical fossae, and typically partially contain the cecum and/or sigmoid col...
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Lateral umbilical folds

The lateral umbilical folds are bilateral raised ridges of parietal peritoneum in the deep aspect of the anterior abdominal wall overlying the inferior epigastric vessels. The paired folds originate medial to the deep inguinal ring and end at the arcuate line on the posterior aspect of the anter...
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Lead pipe sign (colon)

The lead pipe appearance of colon is the classical barium enema finding in chronic ulcerative colitis, and is also seen with other modalities such as CT or MRI. There is a complete loss of the haustral markings in the diseased segment of the colon, appearing smooth-walled and cylindrical.  This...
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Leaping dolphin sign

The leaping dolphin sign (also known as the diaphragm muscle slip sign) may be seen in pneumoperitoneum on a supine abdominal radiograph. It represents the outlining of the diaphragmatic muscle slips by free intraperitoneal gas and usually requires a moderate to large volume of pneumoperitoneum ...
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Left colic artery

The left colic artery is the first branch of the inferior mesenteric artery. Course It ascends retroperitoneally, dividing into two branches: ascending branch passes anteriorly to the left kidney, then enters the transverse mesocolon, and passes superiorly to supply the upper part of the...
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Left colic flexure

Left colic flexure (or splenic flexure) is the bend in the large intestine in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen as the transverse colon continues as the descending colon. The phrenicocolic ligament attaches the splenic flexure to the left hemidiaphragm. It lies more cranial than the right c...
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Left gastric artery

The left gastric artery is the smallest and first branch of the celiac artery.   It passes superiorly over the left crus of the diaphragm, approaching the esophageal opening of the diaphragm, giving off an esophageal branch to the distal esophagus, then enters the lesser omentum to pass along t...
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Left gastric vein

The left gastric vein (also known as the coronary vein) drains both gastric walls. It forms a loop with the right gastric vein at the lesser curvature of the stomach. The left gastric vein travels in the lesser omentum to drain in the portal vein. It also communicates with the lower esophageal v...
Article

Left gastroepiploic artery

The left gastroepiploic artery (LGA) is one of the branches of the splenic artery. Gross Anatomy Course The LGA runs within the two layers of the greater omentum to the right along the greater curvature of the stomach, approximately 1 cm from the gastric wall before it anastomoses with the ri...
Article

Left perihepatic space

The left perihepatic space (also known as the left subhepatic space) is a potential space located between the stomach and the visceral surface of left lobe of the liver. Gross anatomy The left perihepatic space can be further subdivided into anterior and posterior spaces. It is a subcompartmen...
Article

Left subphrenic space

The left subphrenic space is a subcompartment of the left supramesocolic space located between the diaphragm and, the diaphragmatic surface of the spleen and gastric fundus. It is described to have anterior and posterior parts without clear delineation1. Boundaries  medially: falciform ligame...
Article

Left supramesocolic space

The left supramesocolic space is an arbitrary subdivision of the supramesocolic space, which lies between the diaphragm and the transverse colon 1,2. Gross anatomy The left supramesocolic space is separated from the right supramesocolic space by the falciform ligament 3. The left supramesocoli...
Article

Leiomyosarcoma

Leiomyosarcomas (LMS) are extremely rare malignant neoplasms that originate from smooth muscle cells and may be considered the malignant counterpart of a leiomyoma. They are classified as a soft tissue tumor and account for ~8% of malignant soft tissue tumors 10. Pathology Location  Leiomyosa...
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Lemmel syndrome

Lemmel syndrome is defined as an obstructive jaundice caused by a periampullary duodenal diverticulum compressing the intrapancreatic common bile duct with resultant bile duct dilatation. Clinical presentation Patients may present with recurrent episodes of jaundice, pancreatitis and/or cholan...
Article

Lesser sac

The lesser sac or omental bursa is a potential peritoneal space within abdomen, part of the peritoneal cavity. It may be conceptualized as the space posterior to the lesser omentum, between the posterior wall of the stomach and surface of peritoneum which covers the anterior surface of the left ...
Article

Lesser sac hernia

Lesser sac hernias are a type of internal hernia, where abdominal contents protrude through the foramen of Winslow, hence they are also known as foramen of Winslow hernia.  Epidemiology Lesser sac hernias are rare, accounting for <0.1% of abdominal hernias and 8% of internal hernias 1,2. Path...

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