Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

528 results found
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Inflammatory hepatic adenoma

Inflammatory hepatic adenomas are a genetic and pathological subtype of hepatic adenoma. Their appearance and prognosis is different than other subtypes and has the highest incidence of hemorrhage amongst hepatic adenoma subtypes. Epidemiology Most common subtype of hepatic adenoma (40-50%). O...
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Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT), also known as plasma cell granulomas, are rare neoplasms that have a diverse spectrum of biological behavior.  Terminology These tumors were previously referred as inflammatory pseudotumour.   Epidemiology They can occur at any age and there is curr...
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Inflammatory polyps of the gallbladder

Inflammatory polyps of the gallbladder are a subtype of gallbladder polyps, representing ~10% of polyps. Pathology Thought to develop from chronic inflammation, with deposition of cholesterol in the gallbladder wall and mucosal irritation, leading to a fibrous reaction 2. There is no evidence...
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Insulinoma

Insulinomas are the most common sporadic endocrine tumor of the pancreas. On imaging, they usually present as small well-defined hypervascular tumors that may be found anywhere along the pancreas.  Epidemiology Account for 40% of syndromic pancreatic endocrine tumors. The overall incidence is ...
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Interstitial edematous pancreatitis

Interstitial edematous pancreatitis is one of the two subtypes of acute pancreatitis. It is normally referred to as "acute pancreatitis" or "uncomplicated pancreatitis" in day-to-day use. Please refer to the article on acute pancreatitis for further details. 
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Intrabiliary rupture of hepatic hydatid cyst

Intrabiliary rupture of hepatic hydatid cyst is a common complication associated with hepatic hydatid cysts. It is important to appreciate the direct and indirect signs of this condition. Radiographic features The radiological features of intrabiliary rupture of a hepatic hydatid cyst can be c...
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Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms or tumors (IPMNs or IMPTs) are cystic tumors of the pancreas. Epidemiology These tumors are most frequently identified in older patients (50-60 years of age) 6, and thus are sometimes colloquially referred to as the "grandfather lesion". Main duct type ...
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Intrahepatic arterioportal shunt

Intrahepatic arterioportal shunts represent abnormal flow between the portal venous system and a hepatic arterial system within the liver. They can be a reversible cause of portal hypertension. Clinical presentation Clinical features will depend on size and other underlying pathology. Small sh...
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Irreversible electroporation

Irreversible electroporation (IRE), also known as non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE), is a non-invasive soft-tissue ablation technique used for tumor ablation in regions that require very high precision and preservation of surrounding structures. Mechanism In IRE electrodes are p...
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Jaundice

Jaundice refers to a clinical sign of hyperbilirubinemia (>2.5 mg/dl) which has many causes. It is often a clue to a diagnosis. It can be largely divided into two types: non-obstructive, i.e. pre-hepatic and hepatic causes obstructive, i.e. post-hepatic causes Imaging has a major role in dete...
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Kasai classification

Kasai classification is used to describe the three main anatomical types of biliary atresia. Classification type I: obliteration of common bile duct (patent cystic and common hepatic duct) type II IIa: obliteration of common hepatic duct (patent cystic and common bile duct), sometimes with a...
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Klatskin tumor

Klatskin tumor is a term that was traditionally given to a hilar cholangiocarcinoma, occurring at the bifurcation of the common hepatic duct. Typically, these tumors are small, poorly differentiated, exhibit aggressive biologic behavior, and tend to obstruct the intrahepatic bile ducts. Epidemi...
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Komi classification of bile duct cysts

Komi classification of bile duct cysts, as stated by Komi et al, divides anomalous union of the pancreatico-bile ducts (AUPBD) into 3 types based on the angle of union of the ducts 1. Classification type I: union of the ducts at a right angle to each other type Ia: without dilatation or  typ...
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Krenning score of neuroendocrine tumor uptake

The Krenning score is a proposed semi-quantitative method of assessing the degree of tracer uptake on octreotide scintigraphy. Parameters Initially designed for assessment of 111In-DTPA on planar imaging, the Krenning score is applicable to SPECT or SPECT/CT using various radiopharmaceuticals....
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Labelled imaging anatomy cases

This article lists a series of labelled imaging anatomy cases by system and modality. Brain CT head: non-contrast axial CT head: non-contrast coronal CT head: non-contrast sagittal CT head: angiogram axial CT head: angiogram coronal CT head: angiogram sagittal MR head: T2 axial MR head:...
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Lamellated (term)

The term lamellated (or laminated) is a radiopathological term used to describe the layered appearance of many calculi, including those of the renal tract, the salivary glands, and the biliary tree. The internal structure of these calculi has been likened to that of an onion with multiple concen...
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Left hepatic artery

The left hepatic artery (LHA) is formed when the proper hepatic artery (PHA) bifurcates. The hepatic arteries provide 25% of the blood supply and 50% of the oxygen supply to the liver. Gross anatomy The PHA bifurcates into the left and right hepatic arteries at or before reaching the porta hep...
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Left triangular ligament of the liver

The left triangular ligament is a peritoneal suspensory ligament of the liver. It is formed by the fusion of the superior and inferior reflections of the coronary ligament. It is shorter than the right triangular ligament and does not separate the left subphrenic space from the subhepatic space.
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Lemmel syndrome

Lemmel syndrome is defined as an obstructive jaundice caused by a periampullary duodenal diverticulum (of the second part of the duodenum) compressing the intrapancreatic part of the common bile duct with resultant upstream dilatation of the extra- and intrahepatic bile ducts. Clinical presenta...
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Leptospirosis

Leptospirosis results from infection of the zoonoses Leptospira spp. The condition can have multiorgan manifestations. Commonly affected organs include: lung: pulmonary leptospirosis liver: hepatic leptospirosis central nervous system: CNS leptospirosis skeletal muscle: muscular leptospirosi...
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Leukemic infiltration of liver

Leukemic infiltration of the liver can occur with several forms of leukemia inclusive of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).  Radiographic features CT Described features are non-specific but include: hepatomegaly periportal low att...
Article

Ligamentum venosum

The ligamentum venosum is a fibrous remnant which travels superiorly from the porta hepatis of the liver to the inferior vena cava. It is often obliterated in adults.  In the fetus, it is patent and known as the ductus venosus which shunts blood returning from the placenta in the umbilical vein...
Article

Light bulb sign (hepatic hemangioma)

The light bulb sign of a hepatic hemangioma is a feature than can be seen on MRI imaging with a classic hepatic hemangioma. This refers to marked hyperintensity seen on heavily T2 weighted sequences that has been likened to a glowing light bulb. See also light bulb sign - shoulder light bulb ...
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Limy bile

Limy bile stands for the presence of a viscous substance in the dependent parts of the gallbladder and/or bile ducts, almost entirely composed of calcium carbonate, and therefore highly radiopaque. Terminology The terms limy bile and calcium milk gallbladder can be used interchangeably for inc...
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Lipase

Lipase, more specifically pancreatic lipase, is an enzyme produced in the pancreas and is responsible for the digestion of fat molecules. It may be raised (hyperlipasaemia) in numerous pancreatic, hepatobiliary and other diseases but is most commonly associated with acute pancreatitis. Physiolo...
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Liquefactive necrosis

Liquefactive necrosis is a form of necrosis where there is transformation of the tissue into a liquid viscous mass. Pathology In liquefactive necrosis, the affected cell is completely digested by hydrolytic enzymes leading to a soft, circumscribed lesion which can consist of fluid with remains...
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LI-RADS

LI-RADS (Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System) is both a set of standardized terminology and a classification system for imaging findings in liver lesions. The LI-RADS score for a liver lesion is an indication of its relative risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The classification system ...
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Littoral cell angioma of the spleen

Littoral cell angioma of the spleen (LCA) is a rare and relatively recently (1991) described vascular tumor of the spleen. Epidemiology Littoral cell angiomas may occur at any age and have no gender predilection. Clinical presentation Typically, patients with littoral cell angioma are found ...
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Liver

The liver is the largest abdominal organ that plays a major role in metabolism and has a number of functions, including glycogen storage, decomposition of red blood cells, plasma protein synthesis, hormone production, and detoxification. It is one of the very few organs that has the ability to r...
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Liver and biliary interventional procedures

There is a wide range of liver and biliary interventional procedures, both diagnostic and therapeutic, most commonly using CT-guidance or ultrasound-guidance.   Vascular Interventions: transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) Percutaneous interven...
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Liver biopsy (transjugular)

Transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) is an alternative to a percutaneous liver biopsy in patients with diffuse liver disease, coagulopathy and ascites. It is sometimes done in combination with a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPSS) or venography. Indications massive ascites coag...
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Liver cancer (BCLC staging)

Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) staging uses a set of criteria to guide management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The classification takes the following variables into account 1,2: performance status (PS)  Child-Pugh score radiologic tumor extent tumor size multiple ...
Article

Liver lesions

Liver lesions represent a heterogeneous group of pathology ranging from solitary benign lesions to multiple metastases from a variety of primary tumors. Liver lesions may be infiltrative or have mass effect, be solitary or multiple, benign or malignant. Assessment of liver lesions takes into c...
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Liver lesions (pediatric)

Pediatric liver lesions are a heterogeneous group that include infiltrative lesions and those that demonstrate mass effect. Moreover, they may be solitary or multiple, benign or malignant: benign liver tumors malignant liver tumors Epidemiology There are differing frequencies of both benign ...
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Liver lobules

Liver lobules are the basic functional units of the liver. They are classically described ('classic lobules') as hexagonal structures made of six vertically aligned portal canals with a central vein. However, microscopic evaluation of the liver usually shows a lack of classic liver lobule as a w...
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Liver protocol (MRI)

Examination of the liver with MRI requires numerous sequences and imaging at multiple times after the administration of gadolinium. Many variations exist, but a typical protocol would include:  Pre-contrast T2 T2 fat sat T1 weighted gradient echo in and out of phase T1 2D or 3D gradient ech...
Article

Liver sinusoid

Liver sinusoids are a type of fenestrated/porous blood vessel which compose the 'capillary bed' of the liver parenchyma. They receive terminal branches of the oxygen-rich hepatic artery (terminal hepatic arterioles) and nutrient-rich portal vein (terminal portal venules). They facilitate vascula...
Article

Liver trauma

The liver is one of the most frequently damaged organs in blunt trauma, and liver trauma is associated with a significant mortality rate. Epidemiology In blunt abdominal trauma, the liver is injured ~5% (range 1-10%) of the time 1,3. Clinical presentation Patients can present with right uppe...
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Liver tumors

Liver tumors, like tumors of any organ, can be classified as primary or secondary. Metastases Liver metastases are by far the most common hepatic malignancy, with many of the most common primaries readily seeding to the liver. This is especially the case with gastrointestinal tract tumors, due...
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Lollipop sign

The lollipop sign is seen in hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE). It represents hepatic/portal vein and/or their tributaries/branches tapering and terminating at or just within the edge of a well defined peripherally enhancing (or non-enhancing) lesion with an avascular core on CT or...
Article

Low phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis syndrome

Low phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis (LPAC) syndrome is one of the syndromes associated with ABCB4/MDR3 mutation. Characteristics of this syndrome include 1,2: intrahepatic microlithiasis/sludge symptomatic cholesterol stones with early onset (<40 years) recurrent symptoms post cholecys...
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LR2 cirrhosis-associated nodule

LR2 cirrhosis-associated nodules are defined as "probably benign" according to the LI-RADS classification system. They are a common finding in a cirrhotic liver and do not need to be mentioned in the report.  Radiographic features The nodule must demonstrate all of the following: diameter <20...
Article

Macroamylasaemia

Macroamylasaemia is the presence of serum amylase of a large molecular size, seen in both otherwise healthy individuals, and also in various diseases. Amylase seems to be able to self-polymerise and/or form complexes with other blood proteins, e.g. immunoglobulins. Epidemiology Macroamylasaemi...
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Macrolipasaemia

Macrolipasaemia is the presence of serum lipase of a large molecular size, seen occasionally in otherwise healthy individuals, but more commonly in various diseases. Lipase is able to self-polymerise and/or form complexes with other blood proteins e.g. immunoglobulins. Epidemiology Epidemiolog...
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Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a non-invasive imaging technique to visualize intra and extrahepatic biliary tree and pancreatic ductal system. It can provide the diagnostic range equivalent to the ERCP and so it can replace the ERCP in high risk patient to avoid significa...
Article

Malignant biliary tract obstruction (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Malignant biliary tract obstruction (MBTO) represents a group of conditions that cause obstructive jaundice. While most examples are the result of pancreatic head cancers, other malignancies may be causative. Reference art...
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Malignant liver tumors (pediatric)

Pediatric malignant liver tumors are rare, some of which occur only in children but that are similar to those that occur in adults. Epidemiology Malignant liver tumors account for ~1% of pediatric malignancies 2. Pathology Broadly, any malignant liver mass can be defined as a metastasis or p...
Article

Mallory bodies

Mallory bodies are cytoplasmic eosinophylic inclusions in hepatocytes, associated with ballooning and inflammation, found in: alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatitis non-alcoholic fatty liver disease hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) cholestasis
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Mastocytosis

Mastocytosis is a disorder of excessive mast cell proliferation, which is now classified as a myeloproliferative neoplasm. Two clinical entities fall under the mastocytosis umbrella: cutaneous (urticaria pigmentosa) and systemic mastocytosis (with or without cutaneous manifestations). The articl...
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Meandering main pancreatic duct

Meandering main pancreatic duct (MMPD) comprises of a reverse Z-type and loop-type of pancreatic ducts. These ductal variants are found in ERCP and MRCP studies. The exact incidence is not known. Increased incidence of meandering pancreatic duct has been reported in patients with idiopathic re...
Article

Medical devices in the abdomen and pelvis

Medical devices in the abdomen and pelvis are important to be recognised, just like medical devices of the chest. Often we ignore these devices, considering them to be incidental and non-pathological, however it is essential to be aware of potential complications. Gastrointestinal tubes stomac...
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Meglumine iotroxate (Biliscopin)

Meglumine iotroxate (BiliscopinTM) is an iodinated, intravenous contrast agent that is preferentially excreted into the biliary tree and is used in CT intravenous cholangiography. The typical dose is 100 mL Biliscopin (105 mg meglumine iotroxate/mL; 5.0 g iodine), which is administered via slow...
Article

MELD score

The MELD score (Model for End-stage Liver Disease) is a classification used to grade liver dysfunction in preparation for liver transplantation. It is an estimate of 3 month mortality. The components of the score are: serum creatinine (mg/dl) if dialysis twice in last week, then bilirubin is ...
Article

Melioidosis

Melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (previously known as Pseudomonas pseudomallei) and is a multisystem disorder which may affect the lungs, brain, visceral organs, or musculoskeletal system. Epidemiology Melioidosis is a disease of the monsoon season in th...
Article

Mercedes-Benz sign (gallbladder)

In the gallbladder, the Mercedes-Benz sign describes a star-shaped pattern of gas-fissuring within gallstones initially described on an abdominal radiograph 2. Fissures, usually fluid-filled, are present in close to 50% of gallstones. Less than half of these fissured gallstones contain some amo...
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METAVIR score

The METAVIR​ scoring system is a system used to assess the extent of inflammation and fibrosis by histopathological evaluation in a liver biopsy of patients with hepatitis C. The grade indicates the activity or degree of inflammation while the stage represents the amount of fibrosis or scarring....
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Mickey Mouse appearance

In medical imaging literature, a Mickey Mouse appearance has been given to imaging features that depict that of Mickey Mouse when viewed from the front. It has been described in the following: anencephaly 2 progressive supranuclear palsy 1 synonymously with a finger in glove sign the flared ...
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Middle hepatic artery

The middle hepatic artery (MHA) is an intrahepatic hilar arterial branch, usually arising from the left hepatic artery, which supplies segments IVa and IVb. It runs towards the right side of the umbilical fissure. Variant anatomy it may arise from the right hepatic artery 1,2 it may arise as ...
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Milan criteria in liver tranplantation

The Milan criteria are a generally accepted set of criteria used to assess suitability in patients for liver transplantation with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In order to be suitable for a liver transplantation, one needs to have 1: single tumor with a diameter of ≤5 cm, or up to 3 ...
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Milk of calcium (disambiguation)

The term milk of calcium (MOC) is given to dependent, sedimented calcification within a cystic structure or hollow organ. This sort of colloidal calcium suspension layering can occur in various regions: renal: milk of calcium in renal cyst (most common) breast: milk of calcium in breast cyst ...
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Mirizzi syndrome

The Mirizzi syndrome refers to an uncommon phenomenon which results in extrinsic compression of an extrahepatic biliary duct from one or more calculi within the cystic duct or gallbladder. It is a functional hepatic syndrome but can often present with biliary duct dilatation and can mimic other ...
Article

MR liver iron quantification

MR liver iron quantification is a non-invasive means of measuring liver iron concentration, a key indicator in the management of patients with hemochromatosis (primary or secondary). Advantages Apart from being non-invasive, sampling occurs in a large cross-section of the liver, as opposed to ...
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Mucocele

A mucocele simply refers to accumulation and expansion of a structure by mucus. It occurs in a variety of locations which are discussed separately: paranasal sinus mucocele oral cavity e.g. ranula, mucous retention cysts mucocele of the appendix 1 mucocele of the gallbladder mucocele of the...
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Multiple biliary hamartomas

Multiple biliary hamartomas (MBH) are a rare cause of multiple benign hepatic lesions. The condition is also known as von Meyenburg complexes, multiple bile duct hamartomas and biliary micro hamartomas. MBH is asymptomatic and usually found incidentally, where it is important to differentiate fr...
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Multiple FNH syndrome

Multiple focal nodular hyperplasia occurs in approximately 20-25% of patients with focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH). It is defined by The International Working Party as consisting of two or more FNHs in combination with 1: liver hemangioma or vascular malformations (most frequent types: hepatic...
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Myelofibrosis

Myelofibrosis is a haematologic disorder where there is the replacement of bone marrow with collagenous connective tissue and progressive fibrosis. It is also classified as a myeloproliferative disorder. It is characterized by: extramedullary hematopoiesis progressive splenomegaly anemia var...
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Neimeier classification of gallbladder perforation

The classification of gallbladder perforation was proposed by Neimeier and later modified by Anderson et al. in 1987, which at the time of writing (July 2016) remains the most widely accepted classification for gall bladder perforation. According to this classification, there are three main cli...
Article

Niacin (vitamin B3) excess

In general taking large doses of water-soluble vitamins has not been found to have a deleterious clinical effect. However niacin (vitamin B3) excess can be problematic, usually when greater than 100 mg niacin is taken per day. To put this in context the recommended daily allowance (RDA) in the U...
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Niemann-Pick disease

Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) is actually a collection of a number of distinct autosomal recessive lysosomal storage diseases. They are divided into two groups of two based on the underlying metabolic deficiency: deficiency of acid sphingomyelinase 1,3,4 Niemann-Pick disease type A (NPD-A) sever...
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Niemann-Pick disease type A

Niemann-Pick disease type A (NPD-A) is one of a group of autosomal recessive lysosomal lipid storage disorders (see Niemann-Pick disease) that presents in early childhood and usually progresses to death within a few years. It shares the same enzyme deficiency as Niemann-Pick disease type B (NPD-...
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Niemann-Pick disease type C

Niemann-Pick disease type c (NPD-C or just NPC) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder classed under Niemann-Pick disease on account of clinical similarities, namely hepatosplenomegaly and variable involvement of the central nervous system.  Epidemiology NPD-C is inherited as a a...
Article

Nodule-in-nodule appearance (liver)

In hepatic imaging, a nodule-in-nodule appearance represents foci of abnormal arterial enhancement within a liver lesion, in cases of a liver regenerative nodule with a focus of hepatocellular carcinoma or high-grade dysplastic nodule. It is so called because of the nodular arterial enhancement ...
Article

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) occurs when fat is deposited into hepatocytes without a known cause (such as with alcoholic fatty liver disease). The deposition of fat may lead to hepatic inflammation (hepatitis) and may eventually lead to cirrhosis. Terminology "Non-alcoholic fatty ...
Article

Non-neoplastic solid lesions of the pancreas

Non-neoplastic solid lesions of the pancreas are conditions which may mimic pancreatic neoplasms on imaging. They include: focal pancreatitis autoimmune pancreatitis fatty infiltration-replacement intrapancreatic accessory spleen peripancreatic lymph node congenital anomalies prominent pa...
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Non visualization of the fetal gallbladder

Non visualization of the fetal gallbladder is often a transient finding and in most bases can be eventually detected. However it can be rarely associated with certain pathological conditions. Associations cystic fibrosis aneuploidy agenesis of the gallbladder biliary atresia See also dif...
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Normal hepatic vein Doppler

The hepatic veins have a characteristic spectral Doppler waveform. Alterations in the normal hepatic vein waveform may reveal or confirm abnormalities in the heart or liver. Terminology The key factor in the shape of the hepatic vein spectral Doppler waveform is the motion of the heart. Multip...
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Normal hepatobiliary imaging examples

This article lists examples of normal imaging of the liver and biliary tree and surrounding structures, divided by region and modality. Liver Plain radiographs liver silhouette: example Ultrasound liver ultrasound example 1 with shear wave elastography liver Doppler ultrasound: example ne...
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Nubbin sign

Nubbin sign (also called as cystic duct sign) is an important sign in a HIDA scan (cholescintigraphy using iminodiacetic acid analogs) that may be seen in cases of gallbladder neck obstruction. The "nubbin" refers to a small amount of radiotracer activity in the cystic duct, with absence of trac...
Article

Nutmeg liver

A nutmeg liver appearance is due to a perfusion abnormality of the liver usually as result of hepatic venous congestion. When hepatic veins are congested, contrast is prevented from diffusing through the liver in a normal manner. This results in a mottled pattern of contrast enhancement in the a...
Article

Obstructive jaundice (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Obstructive jaundice represents a set of conditions that cause jaundice by obstructing the flow of bile into the duodenum anywhere along the intrahepatic or extrahepatic biliary tree. Reference article This is a summary a...
Article

Okuda staging system

The Okuda staging system was an advance on earlier hepatocellular (HCC) staging classifications, in that it incorporated both cancer-related variables and liver function related variables to determine prognosis 1: disease involving >50% of hepatic parenchyma ascites albumin ≤3 mg/dL bilirubi...
Article

Omentum

An omentum is a double layer of peritoneum that attaches the stomach to another viscus: the greater omentum hangs from the greater curvature of the stomach like an apron the lesser omentum attaches the lesser curvature of the stomach to the liver superiorly Gross anatomy Greater omentum The...
Article

Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) classification

Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) is the unified transplantation network in the United States and runs under the administration of United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). OPTN classification is the part of the imaging policy of UNOS that consists of in order to determine the ...
Article

Pediatric liver tumor (PRETEXT grouping system)

The PRETEXT system proposed by the International Childhood Liver Tumors Strategy Group (previously called Société Internationale d’Oncologie Pédiatrique - Epithelial Liver Tumor Study Group - SIOPEL) aims for staging and risk stratification of liver tumors at diagnosis.  It is used to describe ...
Article

Pancreas

The pancreas is a retroperitoneal organ that has both endocrine and exocrine functions: it is involved in the production of hormones (insulin, glucagon and somatostatin), and also involved in digestion by its production and secretion of pancreatic juice. Gross anatomy The pancreas can be divid...
Article

Pancreas divisum

Pancreas divisum represents a variation in pancreatic ductal anatomy that can be associated with abdominal pain and idiopathic pancreatitis. It is characterized, in the majority of cases, by the dorsal pancreatic duct (main pancreatic and Santorini ducts) directly entering the minor papilla with...
Article

Pancreatic atrophy

Pancreatic atrophy is non-specific and is common in elderly patients, although in younger patients it can be a hallmark of pathology. Most commonly it is associated with aging, obesity and end-stage chronic pancreatitis.  It occurs principally with fatty replacement of the pancreas (pancreatic ...
Article

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma makes up the vast majority (~90%) of all pancreatic neoplasms and remains a disease with a very poor prognosis and high morbidity. On imaging, it usually presents as a hypodense mass on CT that is poorly marginated, which may encase vessels and the common biliar...
Article

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (staging)

Staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is traditionally done according to American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) / Union for International Cancer Control (IUCC) TNM system.  In 2017 new edition (8th edition) AJCC published with some major changes; now exocrine and endocrine tumors of the...
Article

Pancreatic duct diameter

The diameter of the (main) pancreatic duct is a commonly assessed parameter in imaging. Gross anatomy The duct diameter is greatest at the head and neck region and is slightly narrower towards the body and tail. Its normal reported value ranges between 1-3.5 mm 5,8: head: 3.5 mm body: 2.5 mm...
Article

Pancreatic ducts

The ductal embryology of the pancreas is moderately complicated, leading to a number of anatomical variants of the pancreatic ducts, many of which are clinically significant. The normal arrangement is for the entire pancreas to be drained via a single duct, to the ampulla of Vater through the s...
Article

Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia

Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) is a precursor lesion to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but the frequency at which this transition occurs is unknown.  Epidemiology Increasing incidence with age 1. Risk factors: obesity pancreatic lipomatosis 3 Pathology Mostly flat lesions ...
Article

Pancreatic lipomatosis

Pancreatic lipomatosis refers to the fatty replacement of pancreatic parenchyma. This finding is most often associated with obesity and aging.  It tends to be commonest pathological condition involving the pancreas. The condition may occasionally simulate a mass-like lesion particularly when fa...

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