Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

3,191 results found
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Discogenic vertebral sclerosis

Discogenic vertebral sclerosis is one of the skeletal "do not touch" lesions and should not be confused with a metastatic lesion or disc space infection. It can lead to an unnecessary biopsy. Clinical presentation The typical clinical presentation is a middle-aged female with chronic low back ...
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Discoid meniscus

Discoid menisci are those that have a body that is too wide, usually affecting the lateral meniscus. They are incidentally found in 3-5% of knee MRI examinations.  Epidemiology Discoid menisci are congenital, frequently bilateral (up to 50%) and have been reported in twins, although no genetic...
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Disc osteophyte complex

Disc osteophyte complex (also known as disc osteophyte bar) is a term used on MRI of the cervical spine to denote the presence of disc protrusion and/or marginal endplate osteophytes resulting in narrowing of the cervical canal. The term was introduced early in the practice of MRI as distinguish...
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Disc protrusion

Disc protrusions are a type of disc herniation characterized by protrusion of disc content beyond the normal confines of the intervertebral disc, over a segment less than 25% of the circumference of the disc. The width of the base is wider than the largest diameter of the disc material which pro...
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Disc sequestration

Sequestrated disc, also referred to as a free disc fragment, corresponds to extruded disc material that has no continuity with the parent disc and is displaced away from the site of extrusion. By definition, it corresponds to a subtype of disc extrusion. The term "migrated" disc refers only to ...
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Disorganized periosteal reaction

Disorganized or complex periosteal reaction has spicules with random orientation and appearance. It can be seen in highly aggressive processes: osteosarcoma metastasis osteomyelitis chondrosarcoma Ewing sarcoma stress fracture malignant fibrous histiocytoma spindle cell sarcoma See also...
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Disproportionate posterior horn sign (meniscal tear)

The disproportionate posterior horn sign is a feature described with a meniscal tear having a posteriorly flipped fragment. Pathology Bucket handle tears of meniscus of the knee joint constitute 10% of meniscal tears. They consist of a vertical or longitudinal tear (which includes vertical-obl...
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Distal appendicular skeletal metastases

Distal appendicular skeletal metastases, especially distal to the knee and elbow joints, are uncommon. Clinical presentation Localized pain and swelling, along with pathological fractures, are the most common 3.  Pathology Etiology Malignancies that most commonly spread to appendicular skel...
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Distal clavicular erosion (differential)

Erosion or absence of the distal ends of the clavicles may be seen in a wide range of conditions. Differential diagnosis Bilateral erosions weightlifter's shoulder: due to repetitive microtrauma; classically described in weightlifters, but can affect anyone performing repetitive overhead lift...
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Distal fibula fracture (basic)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Distal fibula fractures are the most common type at the ankle and are usually the result of an inversion injury with or without rotation. They are the extension of a lateral collateral ligament injury. Background Pathophy...
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Distal intersection syndrome

The distal intersection syndrome relates to tenosynovitis of the extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon (3rd extensor compartment), where it crosses the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB) tendons (2nd extensor compartment) 1. It is distinct from intersection syndrome which oc...
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Distal phalanx fracture

Distal phalanx fractures are among the most common fractures in the hand.  They represent > 50% of all phalangeal fractures and frequently involve the ungual tuft 1. They are frequently related to sports, with lesions such as the mallet finger and the Jersey finger. When associated with a crus...
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Distal radial fracture

Distal radial fractures are a heterogeneous group of fractures that occur at the distal radius and are the dominant fracture type at the wrist. These common fractures usually occur when significant force is applied to the distal radial metaphysis.  Epidemiology Distal radial fractures can be s...
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Distal radial fracture (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Distal radial fractures are a relatively common group of injuries that usually occur following a fall. The commonest of these fractures is a transverse extra-articular fracture and where there is associated dorsal angulatio...
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Distal radioulnar joint

The distal radioulnar joint is a pivot type synovial joint between the distal radius and ulna. Summary articulation: pivot type synovial joint between the distal aspect of the radius and the ulna movement: rotation of the distal radius ligaments: triangular ligament, and anterior and posteri...
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Distal radioulnar joint dislocation

Isolated distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) dislocations are rare and are more commonly part of complex forearm fracture-dislocations.  Clinical presentation Wrist pain, swelling and deformity following FOOSH or direct trauma. The patient will be unable to supinate/pronate the forearm 1,2.  Patho...
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Distal tibiofibular syndesmosis

The tibiofibular syndesmosis is a complex fibrous joint composed of multiple ligaments and a broad fibrous interosseous membrane that spans between the tibia and fibula throughout the length of both bones. The distal osseous part of this syndesmotic joint includes the following four components:...
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Distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury

Distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injuries are a relatively frequent ankle injury, although less common than a fracture or lateral collateral ligament injuries. They are estimated to comprise ~10% (range 1-20%) of ankle injuries.  Pathology The mechanism of injury is uncertain but thought to be ...
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Distal ulnar fractures

Distal ulnar fractures are common, and usually occur with a concurrent distal radius fracture. Pathology Isolated fractures occurs as a result of direct force to the ulna. Fractures associated with radius fractures usually occur as the result of a fall on an outstretched arm. Distal ulnar fra...
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Disuse osteopenia

Disuse osteopenia is the localized loss of bone secondary to the lack of normal mechanical stresses on the bone. This is usually due to decreased use or even complete immobilization of a limb. Common causes include fractures, neuromuscular diseases, frailty, arthritis and voluntary inactivity/se...
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Dorsal defect of the patella

Dorsal defects of the patella are benign subchondral lesions of unknown etiology and a normal developmental anomaly of the patella, which can be mistaken for a pathological process such as a focus of infection or osteochondritis dissecans. Epidemiology Dorsal defect of patella occurs in males ...
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Dorsal epidural disc migration

Dorsal epidural disc migration represents, as the name suggests, migration of disc material, usually a sequestrated disc fragment, into the dorsal (posterior) epidural space, posterior to the theca. This is a rare occurrence, often not suspected preoperatively and is almost invariably encountere...
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Dorsal fat pad sign (wrist)

A positive dorsal fat pad or stripe sign is defined as a convex dorsal displacement of the dorsal fat pad of the wrist. A positive sign may indicate a distal radius fracture. Is it best visualized on the lateral view of the wrist. Anatomy The normal dorsal skin subcutaneous fat pad is a thin c...
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Dorsal intercalated segment instability

Dorsal intercalated segment instability (DISI) is a form of instability involving the wrist. It occurs mainly after the disruption of the scapholunate ligament and is more often encountered than volar intercalated segment instability (VISI). Clinical presentation radial or dorsal wrist pain, m...
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Dorsal intercarpal ligament

The dorsal intercarpal ligament is one of the extrinsic wrist ligaments. Gross anatomy The dorsal intercarpal ligament has a horizontal orientation, however, together with the dorsal radiotriquetral ligament, it is said to have a zig-zag configuration. It runs from the dorsal tubercle of the ...
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Dorsal interossei (foot)

The four dorsal interossei muscles are the most superior muscles in the sole of the foot and abduct the second to fourth toes relative to the long axis through the second toe. Summary origin sides of metatarsals of toes I to V insertion extensor hoods and bases of proximal phalanges of toes...
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Dorsal interossei muscles (hand)

The interossei muscles form part of the intrinsic muscles of the hand, and as a group consist of four palmar (1st is often rudimentary) and four dorsal muscles. Collectively, the interossei contribute to abduction and adduction of the fingers and also contribute to flexion of the metacarpophala...
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Dorsal radioulnar ligament

The dorsal radioulnar ligament is one of the primary stabilizers of the distal radioulnar joint and forms part of the triangular fibrocartilage complex 1,2. Summary location: extending from posterior margin of the ulnar notch at the distal radius to the posterior portion of the head of the uln...
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Dorsal scapular nerve

The dorsal scapular nerve is a branch from the C5 root of the brachial plexus and supplies the rhomboid muscles. Gross anatomy Origin Posterior aspect of the C5 root of the brachial plexus. Course It courses through scalenus medius then accompanies the dorsal scapular vessels inferiorly, de...
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Dot in a circle sign

Dot in a circle sign is an MRI sign for maduromycosis or mycetoma. It is described as a classic appearance on T2 weighted images which show a small rounded hyperintensity (representing granulation tissue), surrounded by a low signal intensity rim (representing fibrous septa) with a hypointense ...
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Double axillary pouch sign (shoulder)

The double axillary pouch sign is a collection of fluid between a torn anteroinferior glenoid labrum and the glenoid rim, giving the appearance of a second axillary pouch. The sign is seen best with MR arthrography on the coronal view, and is considered by some, a very specific sign for an ante...
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Double contour cartilage line

Double contour cartilage line is a sign in ultrasonography of the gout arthropathy which is characterized by an echogenic line on the outer surface of the joint cartilage parallel to the subchondral bone secondary to deposition of monosodium urate crystals on the surface of hyaline articular car...
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Double contour sign (trochlear dysplasia)

The double contour sign is a helpful radiologic sign which is seen on true lateral plain radiographs of trochlear dysplasia.  A double line at the anterior aspect of condyles that seen if medial condyle is hypoplastic. See also crossing sign of trochlear dysplasia
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Double delta sign (meniscal tear)

The double delta sign is a feature that has been described in a bucket handle meniscal tear when the inner meniscal fragment flipped anteriorly adjacent to the anterior horn of the donor site and is referred to as a displaced bucket handle tear. The original location of the posterior horn remain...
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Double density sign (disambiguation)

The double density sign can refer to several radiological signs: double density sign (left atrial enlargement) double density sign (berry aneurysm) double density sign (osteoid osteoma)
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Double density sign (osteoid osteoma)

The double density sign, also sometimes clumsily referred to as the hotter spot within hot area sign, is a bone scan sign of an osteoid osteoma. It refers to a central focus of intense uptake (the nidus) within a surrounding lower, but nonetheless increased uptake, rim. See also double densit...
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Double disc sign

Thickening of the insertion of the lateral pterygoid muscle can mimic an anterior displaced temporomandibular disc. When both thickening of the inferior belly insertion and an anteriorly displaced disc are present, as in temporomandibular joint dysfunction, the two structures parallel each other...
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Double layered patella

A double-layered patella (DLP) is a rare form of bipartite patella. It is a congenital anomaly which presents with multiple fragmented patellae with smooth, well-corticated borders. A double-layered patella is considered pathognomonic for multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.1  
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Double line sign

The double line sign is an MRI finding seen at the periphery of a region of osteonecrosis (avascular necrosis, bone infarct). It is best seen on T2 weighted sequences and consists of an inner bright T2 line representing granulation tissue and surrounding dark zones representing adjacent scleroti...
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Double Oreo cookie sign (glenoid labrum)

The double Oreo cookie sign refers to the presence of two hyperintense lines in the superior glenoid labrum, one of which represents a superior labral tear and the other a physiological sublabral recess 1, 2. This pattern is likened to an Oreo cookie with two layers of (white) cream and three l...
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Double PCL sign

The double PCL sign appears on sagittal MRI images of the knee when a bucket-handle meniscal tear (medial meniscus in 80% of cases) flips towards the center of the joint so that it comes to lie anteroinferior to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) mimicking a second smaller PCL. A double PCL ...
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Doughnut sign (disambiguation)

The doughnut sign can refer to a variety of different signs: doughnut sign (bone scan) doughnut sign (bowel) crescent in a doughnut sign (bowel) doughnut sign (orbit)
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Doughnut sign on bone scan

The doughnut sign refers to the bone scan pattern whereby there is increased uptake peripherally with a photopenic center. This appearance may be seen in a number of cystic lesions including: aneurysmal bone cyst giant cell tumor simple bone cyst The doughnut sign is a non-specific sign, and...
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Dracunculiasis

Dracunculiasis (also known as guinea worm disease) is a potentially disabling infection caused by Dracunculus medinensis (meaning "little worm from Medina"). Clinical presentation The radiologic finding of a calcified guinea worm is common in endemic areas.  In the vast majority of cases (one...
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Dripping candle wax sign (melorheostosis)

Dripping candle wax sign, also known as flowing candle wax appearance, describes the appearance of sclerotic cortical thickening in melorheostosis. The irregular cortical hyperostosis typically occurs on one side of the involved bone and undulates along much like melted wax down a candle. Patho...
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Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry

Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is a technique used to aid in the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis.  Radiographic features Values are calculated for the lumbar vertebrae and femur preferentially, and if one of those sites is not suitable (e.g. artifact, patient mobility), or if...
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Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a dystrophinopathy and the most common muscular dystrophy. Epidemiology DMD has an incidence of 1 in 3500 to 5000 males 1,2. The condition is extremely rare in females due to its inheritance pattern, as discussed below 1. Clinical presentation The charact...
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Ducroquet view of hip

The Ducroquet view is a radiographic projection of the femoral neck with flexed and abducted affected hip joint.1,4 The view can be used for examining cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Patient position Patient is supine; the affected hip joint is flexed on pelvis of 90° and abducted...
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Dumbbell appearance of spinal tumors

The dumbbell appearance of spinal tumors refers to a tumor which has both a component within the canal and a component in the paravertebral space contiguous with each other via a thinner tumor component traversing the neural exit foramen. The appearance can be seen in: spinal nerve sheath tumo...
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Dupuytren's contracture

Dupuytren's contracture, or palmar fibromatosis, is a fibrosing condition that characteristically presents as a firm nodularity on the palmar surface of the hand with coalescing cords of soft tissue on the webs and digits. Epidemiology It is considered the most common of the superficial fibrom...
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Duverney fracture

Duverney fractures are a type of pelvic fracture most commonly occurring in the setting of a direct blow to the ilium, with a resultant isolated iliac wing fracture. It is regarded as a stable injury but may be operated on in the event of severe comminution.  History and etymology It is named ...
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Dynamic hip screw

Dynamic hip screws (DHS) are a femoral head-sparing orthopedic device used to treat femoral neck fractures. It is sometimes referred to as a pin and plate. Neck fractures that are undisplaced and hence have a low risk of avascular necrosis (Garden I and II fractures) can be treated with head-pr...
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Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica

Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), also known as Trevor disease, is an extremely rare, non-hereditary disease that is characterized by osteochondromas arising from the epiphyses. Epidemiology The incidence is estimated at ~1:1,000,000 3. There is a recognized male predilection (M:F = 3:1...
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Dystrophic soft tissue calcification

Dystrophic soft tissue calcification is a broad term that encompasses a wide range of pathologies that cause soft-tissue calcification and is caused by calcification of damaged tissues.  The amorphous calcification that results may be small or large.  In some cases, ossification may occur - this...
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Eaton classification of volar plate avulsion injury

The Eaton classification was proposed by Eaton and Malerich in 1980, and presently (time of writing, August 2016) along with Keifhaber-Stern classification, is the most widely accepted classification of volar plate avulsion injuries 1.  Knowledge of the orthopedic Eaton classification is practi...
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Ectodermal dysplasia

Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) refers to a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that cause abnormal ectoderm development. The effect is a non-progressive defect in the development of two or more tissues derived from embryonic ectoderm.  Epidemiology ED is rare with an estimated prevalence of 1:...
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Ectrodactyly

Ectrodactyly (also known as a split hand-split foot malformation, cleft hand or lobster claw hand) is a skeletal anomaly predominantly affecting the hands (although the feet can also be affected). The condition has a highly variable severity. Epidemiology The estimated incidence is at ~ 1 in 9...
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Effect of isolated pronation-supination (lateral wrist radiograph)

The wrist series is comprised of a posteroanterior, oblique, and lateral projection. The series examines the carpal bones (namely, the scaphoid, lunate, triquetrum, pisiform, trapezium, trapezoid, capitate and hamate). It also examines the radiocarpal joint along with the distal radius and ulna....
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Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome comprises a heterogeneous group of collagen disorders (hereditary connective tissue disease). Epidemiology There is a recognized male predominance. Clinical presentation Clinically manifests by skin hyperelasticity and fragility, joint hypermobility and blood vessel fr...
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Elastofibroma dorsi

Elastofibroma dorsi is a benign soft-tissue tumor with a characteristic location and imaging appearance. Epidemiology It is more frequently seen in older women, with a reported female predilection of 5-13:1. The estimated mean age at diagnosis is around 65-70 years. Clinical presentation Ela...
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Elbow

The elbow is a complex synovial joint formed by the articulations of the humerus, the radius, and the ulna.  Gross anatomy Articulations The elbow joint is made up of three articulations 2,3: radiohumeral: capitellum of the humerus with the radial head ulnohumeral: trochlea of the humerus w...
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Elbow (acute flexion AP)

The elbow acute flexion AP is a modified elbow AP projection for patients whom cannot straighten their arm for examination. It is comprised of two views demonstrating the distal humerus and proximal forearm structures Patient position Distal humerus projection patient is seated alongside the ...
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Elbow (AP view)

The elbow AP view is part of the two view elbow series, examining the distal humerus, proximal radius and ulna.  The projection demonstrates the elbow joint in its natural anatomical position allowing for adequate radiographic examination of the articulations of the elbow including the radiohum...
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Elbow arthroplasty

Elbow arthroplasties are an increasingly common joint replacement, most often used for treatment of late stage rheumatoid arthritis, but which may also be used as a treatment for late stage osteoarthritis or complex fractures of the proximal radius, proximal ulna, or distal humerus. total elbow...
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Elbow bursae

The elbow bursae are a collection of synovial-lined bursae that exist around the elbow.  They can be divided into bursae around the olecranon and in the cubital fossa. Olecranon bursae superficial olecranon bursa: lies between the olecranon and the subcutaneous tissue. subtendinous olecranon ...
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Elbow (Coyle's view)

The Coyle's view of the elbow is an axial projection that is performed in addition to the standard elbow series when there is suspicion of a radial head fracture 1-3. The projection isolates the radial head using a modified radiographic technique. Patient position patient is sitting next to th...
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Elbow dislocation

Elbow dislocation is the second most common large joint dislocation in adults and the most common in children.  Epidemiology Elbow dislocations are common and account for 10-25% of all elbow injuries in the adult population 1. They are the most common dislocation in children 4. Associations ...
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Elbow extension test

The elbow extension test is a clinical decision rule aimed at reducing the number of unnecessary elbow radiographs in patients aged ≥3 years.  The test has a specific examination whereby the seated patient, with the arm in supination and 90º shoulder flexion, is asked to fully extend the elbow ...
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Elbow (external oblique view)

The elbow external oblique view is an additional projection of the elbow often used to better demonstrate the radial head free from superposition. Patient position patient is seated alongside the table the fully extended arm and forearm, in a supinated position, are kept in contact with the t...
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Elbow (inferosuperior view)

The inferior-superior elbow view is a modified elbow projection for patients in acute flexion greater than 90 degrees, it is also an additional projection to better demonstrate the olecranon process.It is comprised of two views demonstrating the distal humerus and proximal forearm structures Pa...
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Elbow joint effusion

An elbow joint effusion is a key finding to recognize on an elbow radiograph and should be used as a trigger to search for a fracture.  Finding an effusion  Recognizing an elbow joint effusion on lateral radiographs is an essential radiology skill. While the fluid itself is not discretely seen...
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Elbow (lateral view)

The lateral elbow view is part of the two view elbow series, examining the distal humerus, proximal radius and ulna. It is deceptively one of the more technically demanding projections in radiography 1-3. The projection is the orthogonal view of the AP elbow allowing for examination of the ulna...
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Elbow (medial oblique view)

The elbow medial oblique view is a specialized projection, utilized to demonstrate both the coronoid process in profile and the olecranon process sitting within the olecranon fossa of the humerus. Patient position the patient is seated alongside the table fully extended arm and forearm, in a ...
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Elbow ossification

Elbow ossification occurs at the six elbow ossification centers in a reproducible order. Being familiar with the order of ossification of the elbow is important in not mistaking an epicodylar fracture for a normal ossification center.  Appearance Order The order of appearances of the elbow os...
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Elbow ossification (mnemonic)

Mnemonics for elbow ossification include CRITOE and CRITOL. These are essentially the same, apart from the terminal letter which represents the External or Lateral epicondyle. Mnemonics CRITOE C: capitellum R: radial head I: internal epicondyle T: trochlea O: olecranon E: external epicon...
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Elbow radiograph (summary approach)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Elbow radiographs are common plain films that are obtained frequently in the emergency department. Summary approach alignment anterior humeral line drawn down the anterior surface of the humerus should intersect the mi...
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Elbow series

The elbow series is a set of radiographs taken to investigate elbow joint pathology, often in the context of trauma. It usually comprises an AP and lateral projection, although other non-standard, modified projections are utilized for specific indications. Indications Elbow x-rays are indicate...
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Elbow series (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists An elbow series is the standard series of radiographs that are performed when looking for evidence of fracture, dislocation or elbow joint effusion following trauma. Reference article This is a summary article. For more i...
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Elbow synovial fold syndrome

Elbow synovial fold syndrome refers to a condition where patients experience a cluster of symptoms due to the presence of synovial folds (also known as synovial fringe or plicae). Epidemiology It tends to be more common in athletic young adults. It is associated with certain sporting activitie...
Article

Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa

Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa is a rare cause of chronic lymphedema, arising in the setting of chronic nonfilarial lymphedema caused by bacterial or noninfectious obstruction of the lymphatics. Clinical presentation It presents mostly as grossly edematous and disfigured lower extremities, du...
Article

Eleventh rib

The atypical 11th rib is one of two floating ribs. Gross anatomy Osteology The 11th rib has a single facet on its head for articulation with the T11 vertebra. It has a short neck and no tubercle. The angle is slight. Its costal groove is shallow. The internal surface of this rib faces slightl...
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Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma

The embryonal subtype of rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common variety of rhabdomyosarcoma, accounting for 50-70% of cases 1-2. It is typically seen in children below the age of 15. Pathology Embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas are further divided into three sub types 1: spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma ...
Article

Emery-Dreiffus muscular dystrophy

Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is a rare muscular dystrophy characterized by childhood onset of contractures, humeroperoneal muscle atrophy, and cardiac conduction abnormalities.  Clinical course Weakness is slowly progressive, but there is a broad spectrum of clinical severity.  Pathology...
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Emphysematous osteomyelitis

Emphysematous osteomyelitis is an extremly rare form of osteomyelitis which is complicated by infection with gas forming organims. Only a handful of cases are published in literature. Pathology Commonely reported organisms include 1 Fusobacterium necrophorum   Escherichia coli Bacteroides s...
Article

Empty can test

The empty can test is a clinical test used to test the integrity of the supraspinatus tendon. In this test, the patient is tested at 90° elevation in the scapula plane and full internal rotation (empty can). The patient resists downward pressure exerted by the examiner at patients elbow or wrist...
Article

Empty notch sign (anterior cruciate ligament tear)

Empty notch sign is a direct sign of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear/avulsion at its femoral attachment. It denotes a fluid signal at the expected ACL attachment site at the intercondylar notch (fossa) on axial and coronal fluid-sensitive MR images. The proximal ACL is the second most com...
Article

Empyema

Empyemas are purulent inflammatory collections within a body cavity. Contrast this with abscesses, which arise within parenchymal tissue, rather than occupying a pre-existing anatomical space. Terminology Colloquially, the standalone term empyema is used to refer to thoracic empyemas but there...
Article

Enchondroma

Enchondromas, also known as chondromas 7, are relatively common intramedullary cartilage neoplasms with benign imaging features. They share histologic features with low-grade chondrosarcoma, and are sometimes classified under the umbrella term low-grade chondral series tumors. Enchondromas acco...
Article

Enchondromatosis

Enchondromatosis, also known as Ollier disease (see Terminology section), is a non-hereditary, sporadic, skeletal disorder characterized by multiple enchondromas principally located in the metaphyseal regions. Terminology Some authors make a distinction between Ollier disease and enchondromato...
Article

Enchondroma vs low grade chondrosarcoma

Distinguishing between enchondromas and low-grade conventional chondrosarcomas is a frequent difficulty as the lesions are both histologically and radiographically very similar. It is important to remember, though, that differentiating between them may be a moot point since both can either be c...
Article

Endochondral ossification

Endochondral ossification describes the process of ossification from mesenchymal cells (stem cells) with a cartilaginous template and is involved in the healing process of fractures. Bone formation occurs at centers of ossification (or ossification centers) which are either primary or secondary...
Article

Endosteal scalloping

Endosteal scalloping refers to the focal resorption of the inner layer of the cortex (i.e. the endosteum) of bones, most typically long bones, due to slow-growing medullary lesions. It is important to note that although it is evidence of a slow non-infiltrative lesion, it does not equate to ben...
Article

Enlocated

Enlocated is a term popular primarily among Australasian (Australia and New Zealand) radiologists and orthopedic surgeons to describe a joint that is not dislocated.  It does not appear in the Oxford dictionary, nor is it widely used elsewhere in English-speaking countries, although it does app...

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