Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

2,637 results found
Article

Subtalar dislocation

Subtalar dislocations is the simultaneous dislocation of the talonavicular and talocalcaneal joints, without tibiotalar or talar neck fractures 1, and comprises 1-2% of all dislocations, Pathology Mechanism Subtalar dislocations are often associated with high energy trauma, usually, motor veh...
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Secondary synovial chondromatosis

Secondary synovial chondromatosis (SOC) is a disorder that results in intra-articular loose bodies as a result of trauma, osteoarthrosis, or neuropathic arthropathy. It is quite distinct to primary synovial chondromatosis. Pathologically concentric rings of growth may be seen. Radiographic feat...
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First rib

The first rib is the most superior of the twelve ribs. It is an atypical rib and is an important anatomical landmark and is one of the borders of the superior thoracic aperture. Gross anatomy Osteology Compared to a typical rib, the first rib is short and thick and it has a single articular f...
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Typical ribs

Typical ribs are those numbered 2 to 10 with ribs 1, 11 and 12 considered atypical. Gross anatomy A typical rib is long and flat. They contain a: head neck tubercle shaft angle Ribs have a rounded, smooth superior border. The inferior border is thin and sharp.  Osteology Head The head...
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Picture frame vertebral body

Picture frame vertebral body is a radiologic appearance in which the cortex of the vertebral body is thickened. This sign is seen in a patient with Paget disease.  This is a result of disorganised new cortical bone formation after excessive osteoclastic activity causes the resorption of normal ...
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Bone age assessment

Bone age assessment is an important part of the diagnostic and management pathway in children with growth and endocrine disorders. It is helpful in the diagnosis of various growth disorders and can provide a prediction of final height for patients presenting with short stature. Bone age can als...
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Stress fractures

Stress fractures refer to fractures occurring in bone due to a mismatch of bone strength and chronic mechanical stress placed upon the bone. Fractures can either be: fatigue fracture: abnormal stresses on normal bone insufficiency fracture: normal stresses on abnormal bone As they are often i...
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Lisfranc injury

Lisfranc injuries, also called Lisfranc fracture-dislocations, are the most common type of dislocation involving the foot and correspond to the dislocation of the articulation of the tarsus with the metatarsal bases. Pathology Anatomy The Lisfranc joint is the articulation of the tarsus with ...
Article

Blumensaat line

Blumensaat line is the line drawn along the roof of the intercondylar notch of the femur as seen on lateral radiograph of the knee joint. It can been used for: indicating the relative position of the patella as normally this line intersects the lower pole of the patella suggesting ACL injury a...
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Lateral femoral notch sign (knee)

The (deep) lateral femoral notch sign describes a depression on the lateral femoral condyle at the terminal sulcus, a junction between the weight bearing tibial articular surface and the patellar articular surface of the femoral condyle. Pathology The likely mechanism is a hyperextension or im...
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Hallux sesamoid

The hallux sesamoid bones are paired ossicles of the foot. They function as a fulcrum to increase the leverage of both flexor hallucis brevis and longus.  Gross anatomy The hallux sesamoids are ovoid-shaped ossicles. There is a medial (tibial) and lateral (fibular) hallux sesamoid and are embe...
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Lateral talar process fracture

Lateral talar process fractures or snowboarder fractures are talus fractures that can mimic a lateral ankle sprain. It may be an isolated fracture or occur as a component of more complex ankle fractures. Mechanism The fracture occurs when the foot is dorsiflexed and inverted, as can happen wit...
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Reverse Bennett fracture-dislocation

A reverse Bennett fracture-dislocation is a fracture-dislocation of the base of the 5th metacarpal bone. It is pathologically and radiographically analogous to the Bennett fracture of the thumb. It is quite unstable due to unopposed extensor carpi ulnaris pull on the fracture fragment, which cau...
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Metacarpal fractures

Metacarpal fractures are common. Fracture of the metacarpal bones accounts for 10% of all fractures and 40% of all hand fractures. The lifetime incidence of a metacarpal fracture is 2.5%. Terminology Specific names are given to fractures of the base of the first metacarpal (see: fractures of t...
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Morton neuroma

Morton neuromas are focal areas of symptomatic perineural fibrosis around a plantar digital nerve of the foot. The abnormality is non-neoplastic and does not represent a true neuroma. It may more correctly be known as Morton metatarsalgia. The condition is thought to be due to chronic entrapment...
Article

Klippel-Feil syndrome

Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a complex heterogeneous entity that results in cervical vertebral fusion. Two or more non-segmented cervical vertebrae are usually sufficient for diagnosis. Epidemiology There is a recognised female predilection 1. KFS has an incidence of 1:40,000-42,000 2. Clin...
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Pooping duck sign

Pooping duck sign indicates the presence of a triquetral fracture, where an avulsed fracture fragment from the dorsal cortex of the triquetrum projects along the dorsal aspect of the osseous structures of the wrist. In this sign, the fracture fragment represents the poop dorsal to the duck. The ...
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Pisiform fracture

Pisiform fractures are an uncommon type of fracture involving the carpal bones. Epidemiology They are only thought to account ~0.2% of all carpal fractures. Approximately 50% occur in association with other carpal fractures. Radiographic features Plain radiograph Some can be occult on plain...
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Triquetral fracture

Triquetral fracture is a carpal bone fracture that generally occurs on the dorsal surface of the triquetrum. It may be fractured by means of impingement from the ulnar styloid, shear forces, or avulsion from strong ligamentous attachments. It is the 2nd commonest carpal bone fracture, after the ...
Article

Anterior talofibular ligament

The anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) is part of the lateral collateral ligament complex of the ankle. Its role is to stabilise the talus. It is also the weakest of the lateral collateral ankle ligaments.  Gross anatomy The ATFL is an intra-capsular flat two-banded ligament that arises from...
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Wagstaffe-Le Forte fracture

A Wagstaffe-Le Forte fracture refers to an avulsion fracture of the medial aspect of the distal fibula due to avulsion of the anterior tibiofibular ligament attachment. See also lower extremity fractures
Article

Salter-Thompson classification

Salter-Thompson classification for Legg-Calve-Perthes disease simplifies the Catterall classification into 2 groups. Based on the radiographic crescent sign, we can distinguish: group a: including Catteral groups I and II, where the crescent sign involves less than 50% of the femoral head. gro...
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Distal appendicular skeletal metastases

Distal appendicular skeletal metastases, especially distal to the knee and elbow joints, are uncommon. Clinical presentation Localised pain and swelling, along with pathological fractures, are the most common 3.  Pathology Aetiology Malignancies that most commonly spread to appendicular ske...
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Copper beaten skull

Copper beaten skull, also known as beaten brass skull, refers to the prominence of convolutional markings (gyral impressions on the inner table of the skull) seen throughout the skull vault. Clinical presentation The appearance of copper beaten skull is associated with raised intracranial pres...
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Reverse Segond fracture

Reverse Segond fracture is one of the avulsion fracture of the knee, which is due to avulsion of the deep fibers of the medial collateral ligament (also known as the menisciotibial or coronary ligament) involving the medial proximal tibia adjacent to the articular surface. It is the opposite of ...
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Subcapital fracture

Subcapital fracture is the commonest type of intracapsular fracture of the proximal femur. The fracture line extends through the junction of the head and neck of femur. Classification Although many classifications are proposed Garden classification and Pauwel classification are generally follo...
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Osteosarcoma

Osteosarcomas are malignant bone forming tumours and the second most common primary bone tumour after multiple myeloma. They account for ~20% of all primary bone tumours and occur in primary and secondary forms, each with different epidemiology and distribution. Although plain radiography can pr...
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Codman triangle periosteal reaction

Codman triangle is a type of periosteal reaction seen with aggressive bone lesions. With aggressive lesions, the periosteum does not have time to ossify with shells of new bone (e.g. as seen in single layer and multilayered periosteal reaction), so only the edge of the raised periosteum will oss...
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Pathological fracture

Pathological fractures are fractures that occur in abnormal bone. Although the term can be used in the setting of a generalized metabolic bone disease, it is usually reserved for fractures through a focal abnormality. The abnormality may be malignant or non-malignant in nature. Pathological fra...
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Distal fibula fracture (basic)

Distal fibula fractures are the most common type at the ankle and are usually the result of an inversion injury with or without rotation. They are the extension of a lateral collateral ligament injury. Background Pathophysiology Most ankle injuries occur because of an inversion injury. A pure...
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Shoulder arthrography

Shoulder arthrography is a technique used to instil contrast into the glenohumeral joint to evaluate the joint components. It is usually performed under fluoroscopic guidance although the use of US has also been reported 1. All patients proceed to cross-sectional shoulder imaging after contrast...
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Osteochondral defect

Osteochondral defects are focal areas of articular damage with cartilage damage and injury of the adjacent subchondral bone. It is a term that encompasses osteochondritis dissecans and is used synonymously with osteochondral injury/defect in the paediatric population. The recognised sites of os...
Article

Intermetatarsal joint

The intermetatarsal joints are strong interosseous ligaments between the second to fifth metatarsals and serve to maintain the lateral integrity of the forefoot.  Gross anatomy The intermetatarsal ligaments are present between the second to fifth metatarsal. There is no ligament between the se...
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Posterior shoulder dislocation

Posterior shoulder dislocations are far less common than anterior shoulder dislocations and can be difficult to identify if only AP projections are obtained. I high index of suspicion is helpful. Epidemiology Posterior shoulder dislocations account for only 2-4% of all shoulder dislocations (t...
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Sternoclavicular joint dislocation

Sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) dislocation is rare, accounting for only ~2% of joint dislocations and especially when compared to other traumatic upper limb injuries such as clavicular fractures.  Clinical presentation Most cases result from indirect trauma 5, especially high-speed motor vehicle...
Article

Spinal cord compression (summary)

Spinal cord compression is a surgical emergency and if unrecognised or untreated, can result in irreversible neurological damage and disability. If the spinal roots below the conus medullaris are involved, it is termed cauda equina syndrome. Reference article This is a summary article; read mo...
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Skull fractures (summary)

Skull fractures usually occur following significant head injury and may herald underlying neurological pathology. Reference article This is a summary article; we do not have a more in-depth reference article. Summary anatomy cranial vault base of the skull epidemiology accurate incidence...
Article

Kienböck disease

Kienböck disease is the eponymous name given to avascular necrosis (aseptic necrosis) involving the lunate. It is often referred to as lunatomalacia.  Epidemiology The age distribution for Kienbock disease depends on gender. The condition is most common within the dominant wrist of young adult...
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Fractures of the thumb

Fractures of the thumb are important due to huge impact the thumb has on the overall function of the hand, an understanding of the types of fractures that occur is important, as treatment varies with fracture type. Pathology Types Metacarpal fractures include: intra-articular fractures Benn...
Article

Cartilaginous joints

Cartilaginous joints are a type of joint where the bones are entirely joined by cartilage, either hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage. These joints generally allow more movement than fibrous joints but less movement than synovial joints.  Primary cartilaginous joint  These cartilaginous joints...
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Joints

Joints, also known as articulations, are a form of connection between bones. They provide stability to the skeletal system as well as allowing for specialised movement. Gross anatomy Joints can be classified into three broad types according to the tissue that binds them.  Structural types fi...
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Hawkins sign (talus)

Hawkins sign describes subchondral lucency of the talar dome that occurs secondary to subchondral atrophy 6-8 weeks after a talar neck fracture 1. This indicates that there is sufficient vascularity in the talus, and is therefore unlikely to develop avascular necrosis later 2,3. Disruption of ...
Article

Mallet finger

Mallet finger describes a type of injury where there is disruption of the extensor mechanism of the finger at the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP). It is the most prevalent finger tendon injury in sport. The term includes both bony avulsion injury and tendinous injury without avulsion.  Clini...
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Boxer fracture

Boxer fractures are minimally comminuted, transverse fractures of the 5th metacarpal and are the most common type of metacarpal fracture. They typically occur (as the name suggests) when punching and are a common sight in all emergency departments on Friday nights. They should not be confused w...
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Epibasal fracture of the thumb

Epibasal fractures of the thumb (also called pseudo-Bennett fracture) are two-piece fractures of the proximal first metacarpal bone. They are usually stable, depending on the degree of displacement, and often do not require surgery. It is important to distinguish them from intra-articular fractu...
Article

Rolando fracture

Rolando fracture is a three-part or comminuted intra-articular fracture-dislocation of the base of the thumb (proximal first metacarpal). It can be thought of as a comminuted Bennett fracture. Pathology The mechanism is usually an axial blow to a partially flexed metacarpal, such as a fistfigh...
Article

Bennett fracture dislocation

A Bennett fracture-dislocation is a fracture of the thumb resultant of forced abduction of the first metacarpal. Defined as an intra-articular two-part fracture of the base of the first metacarpal bone. Radiographic features Plain radiograph two piece fracture dislocation of the base of the t...
Article

Trapezium fracture

Trapezium fractures are uncommon carpal bone injuries. They can either occur in isolation or combination with another carpal bony injury. Epidemiology Isolated fractures of the trapezium are only thought to account for 3-5% of all carpal fractures 1-2. Pathology They can be broadly classifie...
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Reverse Barton fracture

Reverse Barton fractures, also known as volar type Barton fractures, represents an intra-articular distal radial fracture with volar displacement. In fact, the reverse Barton fracture is a type II Smith fracture: oblique distal intra-articular radial fracture 1-2. For a discussion of this frac...
Article

Colles fracture

Colles fractures are very common extra-articular fractures of the distal radius that occur as the result of a fall onto an outstretched hand. They consist of a fracture of the distal radial metaphyseal region with dorsal angulation and impaction, but without the involvement of the articular surf...
Article

Burst fracture

Burst fractures are a type of compression fracture related to high-energy axial loading spinal trauma that results in disruption of the posterior vertebral body cortex with retropulsion into the spinal canal.  Clinical presentation They usually present as back pain and or lower limbs neurologi...
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Femoral neck fracture

Neck of femur fractures (NOF) are common injuries sustained by older patients who are both more likely to have unsteadiness of gait and reduced bone mineral density, predisposing to fracture. Elderly osteoporotic women are at greatest risk. Epidemiology It is anticipated that the total number ...
Article

Pipkin femoral head fracture classification

Pipkin classification is the most commonly used classification for femoral head fractures, which are uncommon but are associated with hip dislocations. Classification type I: fracture distal to the fovea capitis, a small fracture not involving the weightbearing surface type II: fracture proxi...
Article

Aseptic loosening of hip joint replacements

Aseptic loosening is considered relatively common complication of hip joint replacements. It is usually considered a long-term complication and is often considered as the most common complication 3. Pathology Aseptic loosening can occur as a result of inadequate initial fixation, mechanical lo...
Article

Bowing fracture

Bowing fractures are incomplete fractures of tubular long bones in paediatric patients (especially the radius and ulna) that often require no intervention and heal with remodelling. Epidemiology Bowing fractures are almost exclusively found in children. However, there have been several case re...
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Amsterdam wrist rules

The Amsterdam wrist rules are validated clinical decision rules for determining which patients require radiographic imaging (wrist radiography) for acute wrist pain following trauma. The initial study evaluated 882 patients and were published in 2015 1. The decision rules assessed different clin...
Article

Distal radial fracture

Distal radial fractures are a heterogeneous group of fractures that occur at the distal radius and are the dominant fracture type at the wrist. These common fractures usually occur when significant force is applied to the distal radial metaphysis.  Epidemiology Distal radial fractures can be s...
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Phalanx fracture

Phalanx fractures are common injuries, although less common than metacarpal fractures. They have different prognosis and treatment depending on the location of the fracture. Pathology Phalanx fractures can be intra- or extra-articular and can occur at the base, neck, shaft or head of the phala...
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Proximal phalanx fracture

Proximal phalanx fractures can be epiphyseal or shaft fractures and can be articular or extra-articular. Radiographic features The fracture is generally well seen on plain radiographs. Ultrasonography can be used for fractures that are difficult to see or there are doubts. Treatment and progn...
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Middle phalanx fracture

Middle phalanx fractures are the least common of the phalanx fractures. Radiographic features These fractures are generally well visualised on plain radiographs. Ultrasonography can be used in unclear cases. Treatment and prognosis Non-displaced fractures can be treated conservatively with a...
Article

Volar plate avulsion injury

Volar plate avulsion injuries are a type of avulsion injury. The volar plate of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint is vulnerable to hyperextension injury, in the form of either a ligament tear or an intra-articular fracture. Gross anatomy The volar plate forms the floor of PIP joint sepa...
Article

Distal phalanx fracture

Distal phalanx fractures are common injuries that can result in an open fracture. Radiographic features The fracture is easily seen, especially when intra-articular. Carefully evaluate the soft tissues for nail injury. Treatment and prognosis The majority of distal phalanx fractures are non-...
Article

Jersey finger

Jersey finger (also called Rugby finger or Sweater finger) describes a type of injury where there is avulsion of the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) at the base of the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) 1. Most commonly affects the 4th digit as the FDP insertion into the ring finger is anatomi...
Article

Fracture-dislocations of the radius and ulna

Fracture-dislocations of the radius and ulna illustrate the importance of including the joint above and below the site of injury on radiographic assessment. Most forearm fractures (60%) include fracture of the distal radius as well as an ulnar fracture. In some cases, there is associated disloc...
Article

Gamekeeper thumb

Gamekeeper thumb is essentially synonymous with skier thumb, although the latter has a more acute injury connotation. It is an avulsion or rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the thumb.  Epidemiology The repetitive breaking-of-necks of small game (rabbits and such) resulted in ch...
Article

Mayo classification of scaphoid fractures

Mayo classification of scaphoid fractures divides them into three types according to the anatomic location of the fracture line: middle (70%) distal (20%) proximal (10%) Fractures of the distal third are further divided into distal articular surface and distal tubercle fractures: distal tub...
Article

Scaphoid fracture

Scaphoid fractures (i.e. fractures through the scaphoid bone) are common, in some instances can be difficult to diagnose, and can result in significant functional impairment. Epidemiology Scaphoid fractures account for 70-80% of all carpal bone fractures 1. Although they occur essentially at a...
Article

Hook of hamate fracture

Hook of hamate fractures are rare. They occur from the hamate fracturing after blunt trauma, falls, and in sports player (e.g. golf, baseball, racquet sports) from a direct blow while swinging. Stress fractures have also been reported.  Differential diagnosis os hamuli proprium
Article

Essex-Lopresti fracture-dislocation

Essex-Lopresti fracture-dislocations comprise of a comminuted fracture of the radial head accompanied by dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). The force of trauma is transmitted down the forearm through the interosseous membrane causing disruption. The DRUJ injury may be missed lead...
Article

Monteggia fracture-dislocation

Monteggia fracture-dislocations consist of a fracture of the ulnar shaft with concomitant dislocation of the radial head. The ulnar fracture is usually obvious, whereas the radial head dislocation can be overlooked, with potentially serious functional and medico-legal ramifications.  Mechanism ...
Article

Galeazzi fracture-dislocation

Galeazzi fracture-dislocations consist of fracture of the distal part of the radius with dislocation of distal radioulnar joint and an intact ulna. A Galeazzi-equivalent fracture is a distal radial fracture with a distal ulnar physeal fracture 2. Epidemiology Galeazzi fractures are primarily e...
Article

Chauffeur fracture

Chauffeur fractures (also known as Hutchinson fractures or backfire fractures) are intra-articular fractures of the radial styloid process. The radial styloid is within the fracture fragment, although the fragment can vary markedly in size. Pathology Mechanism These injuries are sustained eit...
Article

Barton fracture

Barton fractures are fractures of the distal radius. It is also sometimes termed the dorsal type Barton fracture to distinguish it from the volar type or reverse Barton fracture. Barton fractures extend through the dorsal aspect to the articular surface but not to the volar aspect. Therefore, i...
Article

Smith fracture

Smith fractures, also known as Goyrand fractures in the French literature 3, are fractures of the distal radius with associated palmar angulation of the distal fracture fragment. Classically, these fractures are extra-articular transverse fractures and can be thought of as a reverse Colles fract...
Article

Frykman classification of distal radial fractures

The Frykman classification of distal radial fractures is based on the AP appearance and encompasses the eponymous entities of Colles fracture, Smith fracture, Barton fracture, chauffeur fracture. It assesses the pattern of fractures, involvement of the radioulnar joint and presence of a distal u...
Article

Flexion tear drop fracture

Flexion tear drop fractures are the most severe fracture of the cervical spine, often causing anterior cervical cord syndrome and quadriplegia. Pathology Mechanism It typically occurs from severe flexion and compression forces, most commonly at C5-6 (e.g. diving head first, motor vehicle coll...
Article

Greenstick fracture

Greenstick fractures are incomplete fractures of long bones and are usually seen in young children, more commonly less than 10 years of age. They are commonly mid-diaphyseal, affecting the forearm and lower leg. They are distinct from torus fractures. Pathology Mechanism Greenstick fractures ...
Article

Torus fracture

Torus fractures, also known as buckle fractures, are incomplete fractures of the shaft of a long bone that is characterised by bulging of the cortex. They result from trabecular compression from an axial loading force along the long axis of the bone. They are usually seen in children, frequently...
Article

Comminuted fracture

Comminuted fractures are fractures where more than 2 bone components are created. The problem with the term is that it includes a very heterogeneous group of fractures from a 3 part humeral head fracture to a multi-part fracture of the femur following a high-energy road traffic accident.
Article

Spiral fracture

Spiral fractures are complete fractures of long bones that result from a rotational force applied to the bone. Spiral fractures are usually the result of high energy trauma and are likely to be associated with displacement.
Article

Salter-Harris type I fracture

Salter-Harris type I fractures are relatively uncommon injuries that occur in children. Salter-Harris fractures are injuries where a fracture of the metaphysis or epiphysis extends through the physis. Not all fractures that extend to the growth plate are Salter-Harris fractures. Radiographic fe...
Article

Proximal femoral fractures

Proximal femoral fractures are a subset of fractures that occur in the hip region. They tend to occur in older patients, and in those who have osteoporosis. In this group of patients, fracture is usually the result of low-impact trauma although, in younger patients they are usually victims of hi...
Article

Keifhaber-Stern classification of volar plate avulsion injuries of hand

This classification was proposed originally by Hastings and later modified by Keifhaber and Stern in 1998. This classification, along with the Eaton classification, is the most widely accepted classification at the time of writing (August 2016) for the management of volar plate avulsion injuries...
Article

Oblique fracture

Oblique fractures are complete fractures that occur at a plane oblique to the long axis of the bone. Like transverse fractures, the term is predominantly used in the context of describing a fracture in a long bone. Oblique fractures are particularly prone to angulation in the plane of the fract...
Article

Distal ulnar fractures

Distal ulnar fractures are common, and usually occur with a concurrent distal radius fracture. Pathology Isolated fractures occurs as a result of direct force to the ulna. Fractures associated with radius fractures usually occur as the result of a fall on an outstretched arm. Distal ulnar fra...
Article

Lateral humeral condyle fracture

Lateral humeral condyle fractures also referred to simply as lateral condyle fractures (in the appropriate context), are relatively common elbow fractures that predominantly occur in children. They may be subtle but are hugely important to diagnose in a timely manner because if they are missed, ...
Article

Anterior superior iliac spine avulsion injury

Anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) avulsion injuries typically occur in athletes during forceful muscular contraction. ASIS is the site of attachment for sartorius and tensor fascia latae muscles.  Pathology ASIS avulsion, like other pelvic avulsion injuries, is a stable fracture. Treatment...
Article

Mandibular fracture

Mandibular fractures are relatively common especially among young men. Although traditionally the mandible and base of skull are thought to form a complete bony ring, interrupted only by the TMJs. This should mean that the mandible should fracture in two places (akin to the bony pelvis) making s...
Article

Bankart lesion

Bankart lesions are a common complication of anterior shoulder dislocation and are frequently seen in association with a Hill-Sachs lesion. Pathology They result from detachment of the anterior inferior labrum from the underlying glenoid as a direct result of the anteriorly dislocated humeral ...
Article

Classification of sacral fractures

There are several classification systems for sacral fractures, but the most commonly employed are the Denis classification and subclassification systems, and the Isler classification system. These classification systems are important to understand as proper classification can impact management. ...
Article

Upper extremity fractures

The upper limb sustains a wide variety of fractures that range significantly in demographics, treatment and functional impact.  clavicle clavicular fracture acromio-clavicular dislocation scapula blade of scapula fracture glenoid fracture acromial fracture coracoid process fracture hume...
Article

Sternal fracture

Sternal fractures occur in ~5% of blunt chest trauma with the manubrium being the most commonly injured part. Clinical presentation Acute, severe sternal pain that is worse with respiration with localised tenderness. Pathology Mechanism of injury Fractures of the sternum can result from bot...
Article

Spondylolysis

Spondylolysis is a defect in the pars interarticularis of the neural arch, the portion of the neural arch that connects the superior and inferior articular facets. It is commonly known as pars interarticularis defect or more simply as pars defect.  Epidemiology Spondylolysis is present in ~5% ...

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