Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

2,637 results found
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Trigger toe

A trigger toe (or hallux saltans if it involves the 1st toe) refers to a uncommon situation where active plantar flexion causes the toes to catch in flexion and the patient is then unable to extend them. It can arise from a number of pathologies and if it involves the great (1st) toe a common pa...
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Trimalleolar fracture

Trimalleolar fractures refer to a three-part fracture of the ankle. The fractures involve the medial malleolus, the posterior aspect of the tibial plafond (referred to as the posterior malleolus) and the lateral malleolus. Having three parts, this is a more unstable fracture and may be associate...
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Triphalangeal thumb

Triphalangeal thumb is considered a form of pre-axial polydactyly. Epidemiology Triphalangeal thumbs have an incidence of 1 in 25,000 7.  Pathology A triphalangeal thumb, as the name implies, has three phalanges instead of the usual two. There is an autosomal dominant genetic transmission 8....
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Triplane fracture

Triplane or triplanar fractures are of the distal tibia only occurring in adolescents. As the physiological closure of the physeal plate begins medially, the lateral (open) physis is prone to this type of fracture. The name is due to the fact of the fracture expanding both in frontal and lateral...
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Triquetral fracture

Triquetral fracture is a carpal bone fracture that generally occurs on the dorsal surface of the triquetrum. It may be fractured by means of impingement from the ulnar styloid, shear forces, or avulsion from strong ligamentous attachments. It is the 2nd commonest carpal bone fracture, after the ...
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Triquetrum

The triquetrum (os triquetrum) is one of the carpal bones and forms part of the proximal carpal row. Gross anatomy Osteology The triquetrum is wedge-shaped carpal bone located between the lunate and the pisiform. It has an oval facet for articulation with the pisiform. Articulations along w...
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Triscaphe joint

The triscaphe joint is the shared joint between the scaphoid, trapezium and trapezoid bones in the wrist. This joint is also referred to by its much longer name, the scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joint. Related pathology This joint may be fused as an alternative to scapholunate fusion in treat...
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Trochanteric bursitis

Trochanteric bursitis results from the trochanteric bursa becoming irritated. Terminology Previously trochanteric bursitis has been attributed as the major cause of lateral hip pain but now the term greater trochanteric pain syndrome is preferred because most commonly the cause of lateral hip ...
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Trochanteric fracture

Trochanteric fracture is a fracture involving the greater and/or lesser trochanters of the femur. Classification Fractures in these region can be classified as: intertrochanteric subtrochanteric greater trochanteric avulsion fracture lesser trochanteric avulsion fracture Intertrochanteric...
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Trough line sign

The trough line sign is a sign of posterior shoulder dislocation on AP films.  In a posterior dislocation, the anterior aspect of the humeral head becomes impacted against the posterior glenoid rim. With sufficient force, this causes a compression fracture on the anterior aspect of the humeral ...
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Tuberculosis (musculoskeletal manifestations)

Musculoskeletal tuberculosis is always secondary to a primary lesion in the lung. Epidemiology The prevalence of the disease is around 30 million globally and 1-3% of the 30 million have involvement of their bones and/or joints. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is responsible for almost all of the c...
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Tuberculous arthropathy

Tuberculous arthropathy is a type of musculoskeletal manifestation of tuberculosis (TB) and a common cause of infectious arthritis in developing countries. Any pathological joint lesion where the exact diagnosis is equivocal should be considered tubercular in origin unless proven otherwise. Ple...
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Tuberculous dactylitis

Tuberculous dactylitis, also known as spina ventosa, is a rare skeletal manifestation of tuberculosis where the short tubular bones (i.e. phalanges, metacarpals, metatarsals) are affected. Epidemiology Tuberculous osteitis is one of the commonest bacterial osteitis. Typically the dactylitis fo...
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Tuberculum sellae

The tuberculum sellae is the ridged process of the sphenoid bone which forms the anterior wall of the sella turcica. Gross anatomy Relations The tuberculum sellae forms the anterior wall of the sella turcica, which houses the pituitary gland. It is an elongated ridge located immediately poste...
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Tumoral calcinosis

Tumoral calcinosis is a rare familial condition characterised by painless, periarticular masses. The term should be strictly used to refer to a disease caused by a hereditary metabolic dysfunction of phosphate regulation associated with massive periarticular calcinosis and should not be used to ...
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Tumours of muscular origin

There are a number of tumours of muscular origin, which overall are relatively uncommon, representing only 1.7% of benign soft tissue tumours, and 10.3% of malignant soft tissue tumours1.  The tumours can be divided according to the type of muscle fibre: Skeletal muscle origin benign rhabdom...
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Tumours of the chest wall (differentials)

Tumours of the chest wall are varied, some of which are found most often in this region. They can be divided into benign and malignant tumours and into those which arise in the ribcage and those of soft tissue density. Benign Benign tumours include 1,3-4: soft tissue haemangioma: common lym...
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Tumours that metastasise to bone (mnemonic)

Tumours that metastasise to bone may be remembered using the mnemonic "lead kettle" spelled PBKTL (lead is Pb on the Periodic Table). PB-KTL Mnemonic P: prostate B: breast K: kidney T: thyroid L: lung For females, breast and lung are the most common primary sites; nearly 80% of cancers t...
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Turf toe

Turf toe is an extreme traumatic dorsiflexion (hyperextension) injury of the toe results in plantar plate injury from sprain to complete tear of the plantar plate capsuloligamentous complex and allows unrestricted range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint. It is common in prof...
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Turner syndrome

Turner syndrome, also referred as 45X, is the most common of sex chromosome abnormalities in females.  Epidemiology The incidence is estimated at 1:2000-5000 of live births, although the in utero rate is much higher (1-2% of conceptions) due to a significant proportion of fetuses with 45X abor...
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Twelfth rib

The twelfth rib is an atypical rib. It is the shortest rib, and one of two floating ribs. Gross anatomy Osteology The 12th rib has a single facet on its head for articulation with the T12 vertebra. It has a short neck and no tubercle. It also lacks a costal groove and angle. internal surface ...
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Two-slice-touch rule (knee MRI)

The two-slice-touch rule is a sign on MRI of the knee used to increase the sensitivity of diagnosing meniscal tears. This rule states a meniscal tear is present if abnormal findings are present on two or more images - these do not have to be contiguous, e.g. can occur on sagittal and coronal sl...
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Tympanic part of temporal bone

The tympanic part of the temporal bone is situated inferiorly to the squamous part and anteriorly to the mastoid part. The tympanic part surrounds the external auditory meatus, forming the anterior wall, floor and some of the posterior wall of the bony external acoustic meatus. The lateral bord...
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Type 1 pelvic resection

Type 1 pelvic resections are complex surgeries that involve removing part of the pelvis, usually to resect malignant tumour. Type 1 pelvic resections remove a varying amount of the iliac bone, and are classified in general terms as "partial" or "complete", depending on how much of the iliac bon...
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Type II collagenopathy

Type II collagenopathies are a group of conditions collectively characterised by abnormalities in synthesis of collagen type II. This usually occurs due to a mutation in the COL2A1 gene. Entities that fall under this group include: achondrogenesis type II platyspondylic lethal skeletal dyspla...
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Typical cervical vertebrae

Of the seven cervical vertebrae, C3 through C6 have typical anatomy, while C7 looks very similar. C1 (atlas) and C2 (axis) have very distinct anatomical features. For a basic anatomic description of the structure a generic vertebra, see vertebrae. Gross anatomy small, oval-sized vertebral bodi...
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Typical ribs

Typical ribs are those numbered 2 to 10 with ribs 1, 11 and 12 considered atypical. Gross anatomy A typical rib is long and flat. They contain a: head neck tubercle shaft angle Ribs have a rounded, smooth superior border. The inferior border is thin and sharp.  Osteology Head The head...
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Ulna

The ulna (plural: ulnae) is one of the two long bones of the forearm. It is located medially in the supinated anatomic position. It has a larger proximal end and tapers to a smaller distal end (opposite to the radius).  Gross anatomy Prominent features of the ulna include: proximal: olecranon...
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Ulnar artery

The ulnar artery is a terminal branch of the brachial artery, arising at the proximal aspect of the forearm. Along with the radial artery, it is one of the main arteries of the forearm.  Summary origin: terminal branch of the brachial artery location: inferior aspect of the cubital fossa sup...
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Ulnar dimelia

Ulnar dimelia or mirror hand syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly of the upper limb characterized by absence of the radial ray (including thumb), duplication of the ulna and duplication of the ulnar halves of the carpals, metacarpals and phalanges 1. Pathology Embryology The embryology of mi...
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Ulnar impaction syndrome

Ulnar impaction syndrome, also known as ulnar abutment or ulnocarpal loading, is a degenerative wrist condition caused by the ulnar head impacting upon the ulnar-sided carpus with the injury to the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). Epidemiology Ulnar impaction syndrome most commonly pr...
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Ulnar impingement syndrome

Ulnar impingement syndrome is a wrist condition caused by a shortened distal ulna impinging on the distal radius proximal to the sigmoid notch. The syndrome is distinct from ulnar impaction syndrome, which typically occurs due to a long ulna (positive ulnar variance) impacting upon the triangula...
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Ulnar nerve

The ulnar nerve is one of the terminal branches of the brachial plexus and has motor and sensory supply to the forearm and hand. Gross anatomy Origin The ulnar nerve originates as a terminal branch of the medial cord of the brachial plexus with nerve root fibres from C8-T1. Course Arm In t...
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Ulnar nerve dislocation

Ulnar nerve dislocation is an uncommon cause of pain and paresthesias in the ulnar nerve distribution. It occurs if the ulnar nerve subluxates and then dislocates over the anterior aspect of the medial epicondyle during flexion and extension of the elbow.  Pathology Ulnar nerve dislocation occ...
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Ulnar-sided wrist impaction and impingement syndromes

There are several distinct ulnar-sided wrist impaction and impingement syndromes. Underlying anatomical causes exist for each syndrome, however, repetitive or excessive use of the forearm and wrist can also contribute. ulnar impaction syndrome: positive ulnar variance ulnar impingement syndrom...
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Ulnar styloid fracture

Ulnar styloid fractures occur in association with ~60% of distal radius fractures. Most of these are small avulsion fractures involving the tip of the ulnar styloid. Pathology Usually, this kind of fracture occurs as the result of a fall on an outstretched arm and is often associated with a di...
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Ulnar styloid impaction syndrome

Ulnar styloid impaction syndrome refers to wrist pain due to a long ulnar styloid process impacting upon the triquetral bone. Pathology An unlar styloid >6mm in length is commonly regarded as being long. Impaction results in chondromalacia of the opposing articular surfaces, i.e. the proximal ...
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Ulnar variance

Ulnar variance (also known as Hulten variance) refers to the relative lengths of the distal articular surfaces of the radius and ulna.  Ulnar variance may be: neutral (both the ulnar and radial articular surfaces at the same level) positive (ulna projects more distally) negative (ulna projec...
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Ulnomeniscal homologue

The ulnomeniscal homologue (UMH) is an obliquely oriented, fibrocartilaginous structure, that forms part of the ulnar collateral ligament complex (ULC). Gross anatomy The UMH is located between the ulnar styloid process and the triquetrum. It adheres to the ulnar joint capsule and merges with ...
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Ultrasound guided biopsy

Ultrasound guided biopsy is one form of image guided biopsy, typically performed by a radiologist.  It is the most common form of image guided biopsy, offering convenience and real time dynamic observation with echogenic markers on cannulae allowing for precise placement. It can potentially be ...
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Ultrasound of the elbow

Ultrasound of the elbow allows high-resolution imaging of elbow anatomy while simultaneously allowing dynamic evaluation of the joint, tendons, and ligaments. Approach There are multiple possible approaches to imaging the elbow with ultrasound. A typical protocol is as follows 1: Anterior elb...
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Ultrasound of the hip (adult)

There are several approaches to ultrasound examination of the adult hip.  Anterior approach Patient positioning supine with the hip in mild external rotation Planes sagittal oblique plane parallel to the long axis of the femoral neck to assess femoral head and neck and for any joint effusio...
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Ultrasound of the knee

Ultrasound of the knee allows high-resolution imaging of superficial knee anatomy while simultaneously allowing dynamic evaluation of some of the tendons and ligaments. Knee ultrasound is somewhat limited compared with ultrasound examinations of other joints because the cruciate ligaments and th...
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Ultrasound of the shoulder

Ultrasound of the shoulder is a fast, relatively cheap and dynamic way to examine the rotator cuff and is particularity useful in diagnosing: shoulder impingement shoulder instability rotator cuff disorders The examination requires attention to technique and appropriate patient positioning. ...
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Ultrasound of the wrist

Ultrasound is a useful imaging modality for evaluation of the wrist, allowing high-resolution imaging of anatomy while simultaneously allowing dynamic evaluation of the joint, tendons, and ligaments. Approach There are multiple possible approaches to imaging the wrist with ultrasound. The exam...
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Umbilical hernia

Umbilical hernias are the most common ventral hernia and occur in the midline. Epidemiology Ten times more common in females 2 and represent ~5% of all abdominal hernias 4. Clinical presentation Umbilical hernias present in the midline as painless or painful mass.  Pathology Umbilical hern...
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Uncovertebral joint

Uncovertebral joints, also called Luschka’s joints, are seen bilaterally between adjacent cervical vertebrae, identified by the cat ear shaped uncinate processes of the C3-7 vertebrae (C1 and C2 have no uncinate processes). Gross anatomy Articulations The articulation forms between the uncina...
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Undifferentiated spondyloarthritis

Undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (uSpA), also known as undifferentiated arthritis, is a non-specific mono- or polyarthropathy that lacks the clinical, serological and radiological features that would allow specific diagnosis. It often turns out to be an early presentation of a more well known ...
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Unfused spinous process

Unfused spinous process, which is really failure of fusion of the neural arch, is a relatively common anatomical variant and is part of the spectrum of spina bifida occulta.  This should be differentiated from accessory ossicles of the spinous process, which appear after non-fusion of the secon...
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Unicameral bone cyst

Unicameral bone cysts (UBC), also known as simple bone cysts, are common benign non-neoplastic lucent bony lesions that are seen mainly in childhood and typically remain asymptomatic. They account for the S (simple bone cyst) in FEGNOMASHIC, the commonly used mnemonic for lytic bone lesions.  E...
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Unilateral facet dislocation

Unilateral facet dislocation is a relatively stable type of facet dislocation. Pathology Mechanism Flexion/distraction associated with rotation. The inferior articular facet of vertebral above moves over the superior facet of the vertebral below and becomes locked. It usually affects C4-C5 or...
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Upper extremity dislocations

Upper extremity dislocations are relatively common on account of the great range of motion the upper limb is capable of (a general principle is that the greater the range of motion of a joint, the more prone it is to dislocation). In many instances dislocations are associated with fractures eith...
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Upper extremity fractures

The upper limb sustains a wide variety of fractures that range significantly in demographics, treatment and functional impact.  clavicle clavicular fracture acromio-clavicular dislocation scapula blade of scapula fracture glenoid fracture acromial fracture coracoid process fracture hume...
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Upper limb anatomy

Upper limb anatomy encompasses the anatomy of the shoulder, arm, elbow, forearm, wrist and hand.
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Upper limb radiography

Upper limb radiography is the radiological investigation of the shoulder girdle, humerus, ulna, radius, carpals and metacarpals of the hand. It is often utilised in the context of trauma to rule out fractures and dislocations. 
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Upper subscapular nerve

The upper subscapular nerve, also known as the short or superior subscapular nerve, arises from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus and supplies the subscapularis muscle. Gross anatomy Origin The upper subscapular nerve branches from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus with fibres...
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Vacuum phenomenon in shoulder

Vacuum phenomenon in the shoulder refers to the presence of intra-articular gas in the shoulder joint. It is a very common occurrence, particularly in external rotation. This can cause circular or linear areas of low signal intensity on GRE MR images of the shoulder obtained with external rotati...
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Valgus vs varus

The terms valgus and varus refer to angulation (or bowing) within the shaft of a bone or at a joint. It is determined by the distal part being more medial or lateral than it should be. Whenever the distal part is more lateral, it is called valgus. Whenever the distal part is more medial, it is ...
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Van Buchem disease

Van Buchem disease (VBD) is an extremely rare hereditary sclerosing bone dysplasia, also known as hyperostosis corticalis generalisata. This disease is characterised most notably by mandibular enlargement and thickening of the skull. Epidemiology Less than 30 cases have been reported in the li...
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Vancouver classification

The Vancouver classification of periprosthetic hip fractures proposed by Duncan and Masri is the most widely used classification system. It takes into account the fracture site, the status of the femoral implant, and the quality of surrounding femoral bone stock. type A: fractures involve the t...
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Vastus intermedius muscle

The vastus intermedius muscle is one of the 4 quadriceps muscles in the anterior compartment of the thigh. The others are the vastus medialis, the vests laterals, and the rectus femoris. Summary origin: upper two thirds of the anterior and lateral surfaces of the femur insertion quadriceps t...
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Vastus lateralis muscle

The vastus lateralis is largest of the four quadriceps muscles in the anterior compartment of the thigh. The others are the rectus femoris, the vastus intermedius, and the vastus medialis. Summary origin femur lateral part of intertrochanteric line margin of greater trochanter lateral mar...
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Vastus medialis muscle

The vastus medialis muscle is one of the four quadriceps muscles in the anterior compartment of the thigh. The others are the rectus femoris, the vastus intermedius, and the vastus lateralis. Summary origin femur medial part of intertrochanteric line pectineal line medial lip of the linea ...
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Vertebra

The vertebra (plural: vertebrae) is the fundamental segmental unit of the vertebral column (also know as the spine). Gross anatomy Vertebrae, apart from those that are atypical, have a similar basic structure which can be described as an anterior vertebral body and a posterior neural (or verte...
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Vertebral anomalies

The vertebral column is affected by a range of anatomical variants of the body and/or neural arch as well as accessory ossicles. Knowledge of basic vertebral anatomy and ossification is essential for describing and understanding the range of anomalies. Variant anatomy Vertebral body hemiverte...
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Vertebral body mass

The differential diagnosis for a vertebral body mass is broad and may range from a completely benign, sclerotic enostosis (bone island) to a malignant primary bone tumour. Classification Broadly, these lesions can be separated into: non-neoplastic lesions primary bone tumours secondary meta...
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Vertebral body squaring (differential)

Vertebral body squaring refers to the loss of normal concavity of the anterior border. It is seen in a variety of conditions including:  Differential diagnosis Ankylosing spondylitis Ankylosing spondylitis is the most common cause of vertebral body squaring. It usually involves multiple level...
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Vertebral haemangioma

Vertebral haemangiomas are the most common benign vertebral neoplasms. They are usually asymptomatic and incidentally detected due to their characteristic features on imaging for other reasons. Please refer on the article on primary intraosseous haemangioma for a general discussion in this enti...
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Vertebral lesion (differential)

Differential diagnosis of vertebral lesions includes:  Lesion originating in vertebral body  intraosseous haemangioma metastases Paget disease multiple myeloma Osteonecrosis vertebral body osteomyelitis lymphoma plasmacytoma giant cell tumour Langerhans cell histiocytosis fibrous dys...
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Vertebral metastases

Vertebral metastases represent the secondary involvement of the vertebral spine by haematogenously-disseminated metastatic cells. They must be included in any differential diagnosis of a bone lesion in a patient older 40 years. This article will focus only on the metastasis involving the bony s...
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Vertebral pneumatocyst

Vertebral pneumatocysts refers to the presence of a gas-filled cavity within the vertebrae, more prevalent on the cervical spine. Intraosseous pneumatocysts are more common adjacent to the sacroiliac joint while it is rare in the vertebral column. Other causes of vertebral gas e.g. Kümmell disea...
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Vertebral scalloping

Vertebral scalloping is a concavity to the posterior (or less commonly anterior) aspect of the vertebral body when viewed in a lateral projection. A small amount of concavity is normal, as is concavity of the anterior vertebral body (see vertebral body squaring). Posterior scalloping Causes of...
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Vertebral vascular foramen

Vertebral vascular foramina are normal findings seen on cross-sectional imaging and should not be mistaken for a fracture, especially in the setting of trauma. They transmit: basivertebral veins (forms Hahn's canal): foramen is seen on the posterior surface of the vertebral body in the midline...
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Vertebra plana

Vertebra plana (a.k.a. pancake / silver dollar / coin-on-edge vertebra) is the term given when a vertebral body has lost almost its entire height anteriorly and posteriorly, representing a very advanced compression fracture. Plural is vertebrae planae. It can occur in a variety of settings, incl...
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Vertebra plana (mnemonic)

Mnemonics to remember the causes of vertebra plana include: IMELT FETISH Mnemonics IMELT I: infection M: metastasis/myeloma E: eosinophilic granuloma L: lymphoma/leukaemia T: trauma; tuberculosis FETISH F: fracture (trauma) E: eosinophilic granuloma T: tumour (e.g. metastases, myelo...
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Vertebra prominens (C7)

C7, also called vertebra prominens, is the seventh cervical vertebra and looks like vertebrae C3-C6, but has some distinct features making it an atypical vertebrae. The name vertebra prominens arises from its long spinous process, which is easily palpable.  Gross anatomy C7 possesses the stand...
Article

Vertebroplasty

Vertebroplasty is an imaging-guided procedure which entails percutaneous injection of surgical polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement into a diseased vertebral body. Vertebroplasty provides pain relief and strengthening of the bone of vertebrae weakened by disease. Indications It can be used as ...
Article

Very bizarre generalised lesions of bone (differential)

Very bizarre generalised lesions of bone tend to make you exclaim "Oh my! What is going here?"  Although there are numerous potential causes, in this situation it is worth thinking of a number of entities: skeletal dysplasias and metabolic diseases Paget disease fibrous dysplasia phakomatose...
Article

Vickers ligament

Vickers ligament is a ligamentous structure connecting the lunate bone and TFCC to the distal radius and is seen in the vast majority of patients with Madelung deformity 1. Release of this thickened ligament may help in improving symptoms associated with Madelung deformity 2.
Article

Vitamin A

Vitamin A (the retinoids) are a group of fat soluble vitamins required for many physiological functions, mainly vision, reproduction and epithelial maintenance. In the retina, a specific retinoid 11-cis-retinal is formed by photo-isomerisation within the rods and cones. Related pathology Patho...
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Vitamin C

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is a water soluble vitamin that is a coenzyme for the formation of the structure protein collagen, particularly creating cross-linking of collagen fibres which greatly increases its tensile strength. It also acts as an antioxidant. Related pathology Pathological manif...
Article

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is used to describe a group of five fat-soluble secosteroid vitamins required for the homeostasis of serum calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D is a prohormone that exists in two forms in humans (D2 and D3). Cholecalciferol (D3) acts by regulating calcium and phosphorus intestinal absorp...
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Volar intercalated segmental instability

Volar intercalated segmental instability (VISI) is a type of instability involving the wrist. It is less often encountered than dorsal intercalated segmental instability (DISI). Clinical presentation It presents in most cases with nonspecific wrist pain and a "clunking" on the ulnar deviation ...
Article

Volar plate avulsion injury

Volar plate avulsion injuries are a type of avulsion injury. The volar plate of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint is vulnerable to hyperextension injury, in the form of either a ligament tear or an intra-articular fracture. Gross anatomy The volar plate forms the floor of PIP joint sepa...
Article

Wackenheims line

Wackenheims line (also known as the clivus canal line or basilar line) is formed by drawing a line along the clivus and extending it inferiorly to the upper cervical canal. Normally the tip of the dens is ventral and tangential to this line. In basilar invagination odontoid process transects th...
Article

Wagstaffe-Le Forte fracture

A Wagstaffe-Le Forte fracture refers to an avulsion fracture of the medial aspect of the distal fibula due to avulsion of the anterior tibiofibular ligament attachment. See also lower extremity fractures
Article

Waldenström sign (hip)

Waldenström sign is the increased distance between the pelvic tear drop and the femoral head. It is a non-specific sign of hip joint effusion. Radiographic features Radiograph >11 mm total distance or >2 mm difference compared to contralateral hip 1, 2 measured between the lateral aspect of ...
Article

Ward triangle

Ward triangle refers to a radiolucent area between principle compressive, secondary compressive and primary tensile trabeculae in the neck of femur. It should be differentiated from Babcock triangle.
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Wartenberg syndrome

Wartenberg syndrome also known as cheiralgia paresthetica is due to compression of superficial branch of the radial nerve in the distal forearm. It can be secondary to tight watch band or handcuffs, compression from distal radius fracture or idiopathic.  Clinical presentation Patients present ...
Article

Wasp-waist sign (spine)

The wasp-waist sign is a radiographic appearance seen in patients with Klippel Feil syndrome. It results from fusion of the vertebral bodies such that the anteroposterior diameter at the level of the affected discovertebral joint is smaller than the diameter at the superior and inferior limits o...
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Weber classification of ankle fractures

The Weber ankle fracture classification (or Danis-Weber classification) is a simple system for classification of lateral malleolar fractures, relating to the level of the fracture in relation to the ankle joint. It has a role in determining treatment.  Classification type A below the level of...
Article

Wedge fracture

Wedge fractures are hyperflexion injuries to the vertebral body resulting from axial loading. Most commonly affecting the anterior aspect, wedge fractures are considered a single-column (i.e. stable) fracture.  Less commonly wedge fractures refer to a subtype of tibial plateau fractures. This a...
Article

Weightbearing foot series (an approach)

Reporting a weightbearing foot series can be a daunting process if you are inexperienced and often results in the films being left for somebody else to report. This article attempts to demystify the whole process by providing a structured approach to their reporting. Technique The weightbearin...

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