Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

888 results found
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British Thoracic Society guidelines for pulmonary nodules

British Thoracic Society guidelines for pulmonary nodules were published in August 2015 for the management of pulmonary nodules seen on CT. In the United Kingdom, they supersede the Fleischner Society guidelines. They are based initially on identifying whether the nodule is solid or subsolid an...
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Bronchial carcinoid tumor

Bronchial carcinoid tumors are carcinoid tumors primarily occurring in relation to a bronchus. They were previously incorrectly termed as bronchial adenomas. They usually occur in association with a segmental or larger bronchus. Epidemiology Typically affects patients from 3rd to 7th decades w...
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Bronchovascular spread (mnemonic)

A mnemonic to remember diseases that undergo bronchovascular spread is: SKILL Mnemonic S: sarcoidosis K: Kaposi sarcoma I: infection (e.g. pneumocystis pneumonia, tuberculosis) L: lymphoma L: lymphangitis carcinomatosis
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B symptoms

The B symptoms (a.k.a. inflammatory symptoms) are a triad of systemic symptoms associated with more advanced disease and a poorer outcome in lymphoma 1,2: weight loss >10% unintentional decrease in body weight in the 6 months preceding the diagnosis fever: >38°C night sweats B symptoms are ...
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BTA ultrasound "U" classification of thyroid nodules

The ultrasound "U" classification of thyroid nodules has been developed by the British Thyroid Association (BTA) as part of their 2014 guidelines on the management of thyroid cancer 1. It allows for stratifying thyroid nodules as benign, suspicious or malignant based on ultrasound appearances t...
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Bulging duodenal papilla

Bulging duodenal papilla​ is a conical or cylindrical protuberance at the medial aspect of the descending or horizontal duodenum at the site of the sphincter of Oddi. It is a finding on small bowel follow-though (and endoscopy) and has a relatively long differential. On cross-sectional imaging, ...
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Bunch of grapes sign (disambiguation)

Bunch of grapes sign refers to the imaging appearance of multiple cystic spaces or lesions and it has been described for multiple pathologies: bunch of grapes sign (hydatidiform mole) 7 bunch of grapes sign (bronchiectasis) 3 bunch of grapes sign (IPMN) 6 bunch of grapes sign (botryoid rhabd...
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Burkitt lymphoma

Burkitt lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma predominantly affecting children. Epidemiology Burkitt lymphoma is the most common (40%) type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in childhood. Median age is eight years with a male predominance (M:F = 4:1) 1. It is less common in adults, accounting for 1-...
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Burkitt lymphoma (abdominal manifestations)

Abdominal manifestations of Burkitt lymphoma occur in the non-pandemic variant of Burkitt lymphoma. For a general discussion of Burkitt lymphoma, and for links to other system specific manifestations, please refer to Burkitt lymphoma. Whenever Burkitt lymphoma presents, it is predominantly an e...
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CA-125

CA-125 is a high-molecular-weight glycoprotein found on the surface of Mullerian and celomic epithelial-derived cell types and is the best known tumor marker for epithelial ovarian cancer 6. Importantly, it may also be elevated in several other conditions (see differential diagnosis section belo...
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CA 15-3

Carcinoma antigen 15-3, usually shortened to CA 15-3 is a tumor marker used in monitoring breast cancer. The test detects levels of MUC-1, a mucin protein in the blood. MUC-1 is thought to be important in the invasiveness and metastasization of cancer cells. Physiology MUC-1 is a normal epithe...
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CA 19-9

CA 19-9 (carbohydrate antigen 19-9 or cancer antigen 19-9) is a serum antigen (monosialoganglioside) that has increased diagnostic use in the management of several malignancies, mainly of hepatopancreaticobiliary origin. It is non-specific, however, and can rise in both malignant and non-maligna...
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CA 27-29

CA 27-29 is a tumor marker and is a soluble form of glycoprotein MUC1. It may be elevated in patients with breast cancer. Tumors of the colon, stomach, kidney, lung, ovary, pancreas, uterus, and liver may also raise CA 27-29 levels. Certain non-malignant conditions are also associated with its ...
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Calcified glial tumors (mnemonic)

In order of decreasing frequency, a useful mnemonic to remember glial tumors which calcify is: Old Elephants Age Gracefully Mnemonic O: oligodendroglioma E: ependymoma A: astrocytoma G: glioblastoma
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Calcified mediastinal lymph nodes (differential)

There are numerous causes of calcified mediastinal lymph nodes. Common causes include: infectious granulomatous diseases tuberculosis histoplasmosis sarcoidosis silicosis treated lymphoma Uncommon causes include: Pneumocystis jiroveci (PCP) pneumonia metastases thyroid carcinoma: papi...
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Calcifying fibrous pseudotumor of the lung

Calcifying fibrous pseudotumors (CFPT) of the lung are very rare, benign lesions of the lung.  Pathology They are composed of hyalinised collagen with psammomatous-dystrophic calcification and a typical pattern of lymphocytic inflammation.  CFPTs usually occur within soft tissues but have bee...
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Calcifying fibrous tumor

Calcifying fibrous tumors, previously known as calcifying fibrous pseudotumors, are rare, benign fibroblastic tumors of the soft tissues. Epidemiology It can occur at all ages and there is no strong gender predilection 1. Fewer than 200 cases have been reported in the English literature 1. Cl...
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Calcifying pulmonary metastases (mnemonic)

A useful mnemonic to remember the causes of calcifying pulmonary metastases is: BOBCAT Mnemonic B: bone (chondrosarcoma, osteosarcoma) O: ovary B: breast C: colon A: any primary post-chemotherapy T: thyroid
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Cancer

Cancer (malignancy is synonymous) refers to neoplasms with malignant potential, i.e. for local invasion and metastasis. This article is a list of different cancers or relevant tumor classification systems, although noting that not all tumors are cancerous. For a list of cancer staging systems, s...
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Cancer staging list

Cancer staging involves a number of systems to help direct treatment and aid prognosis. The AJCC TNM staging schema is the most common, but other systems are used for specific malignancies or body parts. Breast breast cancer staging Chest lung cancer staging malignant pleural mesothelioma s...
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Cannonball metastases (lungs)

Cannonball metastases refer to multiple large, well-circumscribed, round pulmonary metastases that appear not unsurprisingly like cannonballs. The French terms "envolée de ballons" and "lâcher de ballons",  which translate to "balloons release", are also used to describe this same appearance. M...
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Cannonball metastasis (mnemonic)

Cannonball metastases refer to multiple large, well-circumscribed, round pulmonary metastases. The primary tumors for these lesions can be remembered with the help of this mnemonic: CRESP Mnemonic C: choriocarcinoma R: renal cell carcinoma E: endometrial carcinoma S: synovial sarcoma P: p...
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Carcinoid heart disease

Carcinoid heart disease, also known as Hedinger syndrome, is a known complication of carcinoid tumors, and is particularly prevalent in patients who develop carcinoid syndrome. Epidemiology Cardiac lesions are present in approximately 50% of patients with carcinoid syndrome 1. Clinical presen...
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Carcinoid tumor

Carcinoid tumors are a type of neuroendocrine tumor that can occur in a number of locations. Carcinoid tumors arise from endocrine amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation (APUD) cells that can be found throughout the gastrointestinal tract as well as other organs (e.g. lung). In general, they...
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Carcinoid tumors of the lung

Carcinoid tumors of the lung are a subgroup of neuroendocrine tumors of the lung, of lower grade than small cell carcinoma of the lung and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung.  For a general discussion, please refer to the article on carcinoid tumors. Pathology Classification Car...
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Carcinoma of the cervix

Carcinoma of the cervix is a malignancy arising from the cervix. It is the third most common gynecologic malignancy (after endometrial and ovarian). Epidemiology It typically presents in younger women with an average age of onset at around 45 years.  Risk factors human papillomavirus (HPV) 1...
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Carcinosarcoma

Carcinosarcomas are highly malignant biphasic tumors with both carcinomatous (epithelial) and sarcomatous (bone, cartilage, or skeletal muscle) components.  Pathology It can arise in many organs: lung 5: pulmonary carcinosarcoma esophagus 1: esophageal carcinosarcoma genitourinary tract 2 ...
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Cardiac myxoma

Cardiac myxomas, although uncommon are one of the commonest primary cardiac tumors and account for ~50% primary benign cardiac tumors.  Epidemiology Cardiac myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumor in adults (~50%) but are relatively infrequent in childhood, where cardiac rhabdomyomas...
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Cardiophrenic angle lesions

The cardiophrenic space is usually filled with fat. However, lesions originating above or lower to the diaphragm can present as cardiophrenic angle lesions. The more common lesions encountered include: pericardial fat pad pericardial cyst pericardial fat necrosis Morgagni's hernia lymphade...
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Carney-Stratakis syndrome

Carney-Stratakis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition comprising of familial paraganglioma and gastric stromal sarcoma. Terminology It is considered to be distinct from, but perhaps related to, the Carney triad 1. Neither should be confused with the unrelated Carney complex. Histor...
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Causes of perfusion defects on a VQ scan

There are several causes leading to a perfusion defect on a VQ scan with an acute pulmonary embolus being only one of them: Vascular causes acute pulmonary embolus previous pulmonary embolus (including fat embolism, thromboembolism, air embolism, tumor) vasculitides affecting the pulmonary v...
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CEA

Serum CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) is a cell-adhesive glycoprotein that was discovered in colorectal cancer in 1965, and is hence one of the oldest and most used tumor markers. Its name derives from its normal expression in fetoembryonic liver, gut and pancreas tissue. Normal range of CEA is ...
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Central neurocytoma

Central neurocytomas are WHO grade II neuroepithelial intraventricular tumors with fairly characteristic imaging features, appearing as heterogeneous masses of variable size and enhancement within the lateral ventricle, typically attached to the septum pellucidum. They are typically seen in youn...
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Cerebral radiation necrosis

Cerebral radiation necrosis refers to necrotic degradation of brain tissue following intracranial or regional radiation either delivered for the treatment of intracranial pathology (e.g. astrocytoma, cerebral arteriovenous malformation) or as a result of irradiation of head and neck tumors (e.g....
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Cerebral ring enhancing lesions

The differential for peripheral or ring enhancing cerebral lesions includes: cerebral abscess tuberculoma neurocysticercosis metastasis glioblastoma subacute infarct/hemorrhage/contusion demyelination (incomplete ring) tumefactive demyelinating lesion (incomplete ring) radiation necrosi...
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Cerebral ring enhancing lesions (mnemonic)

Convenient mnemonics for the causes of cerebral ring enhancing lesions are: MAGIC DR or DR MAGIC DR MAGIC L MAGICAL DR Mnemonics MAGIC DR or DR MAGIC M: metastasis A: abscess G: glioblastoma I: infarct (subacute phase), inflammatory - neurocysticercosis (NCC), tuberculoma C: contusion ...
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Cervical lymph node (staging)

Cervical lymph node staging refers to evaluating regional nodal metastasis from primary cancer of the head and neck. The following article reflects the 8th edition of the TNM staging system published by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, which is used for staging starting January 1, 2018 1,...
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Chemotherapy induced cholangitis

Chemotherapy induced cholangitis is caused when intra-arterial chemotherapy is introduced to treat liver metastases. This causes strictures of the common hepatic duct and main ducts, but spares distal and proximal (i.e. common bile duct and intrahepatic ducts).  Radiographic features similar t...
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Childhood malignancies

Unfortunately the pediatric population is susceptible to malignancies. The most common entities, in overall order of frequency, are 1-4: leukemia/lymphoma: ~35% * acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 23% Hodgkin disease: 5% acute myelogenous leukemia: 4% central nervous system malignancies: ~20% ...
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Choi response criteria

The solitary use of the size of the tumor during evaluation for response to chemotherapy has some pitfalls and limitations, especially for specific tumors such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The Choi response criteria for GIST proposed that tumor attenuation could provide an addition...
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Cholangiohepatoma

Cholangiohepatoma, also referred to as mixed hepatocellular cholangiocarcinoma (HCC-CC), refers to synchronous cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the same tumor. It is a rare and aggressive primary hepatic tumor combination. The origin of cholangiohepatoma is closely linked...
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Choledochal cyst

Choledochal cysts represent congenital cystic dilatations of the biliary tree. Diagnosis relies on the exclusion of other conditions (e.g. tumor, gallstone, inflammation) as a cause of biliary duct dilatation. Epidemiology Choledochal cysts are rare, with an incidence of 1:100,000-150,000. Alt...
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Choline C-11

Carbon-11-choline (choline C-11 or 11C-choline) is the most studied isotope carbon-11 PET radiopharmaceutical.  The molecule is used for oncologic Imaging 1-4. Choline is one of the components of phosphatidylcholine, a fundamental element of cell membrane phospholipids 5. Cancer cells tend to ha...
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Chondromesenchymal hamartoma

Chondromesenchymal hamartomas are rare, benign, tumor-like nasal masses in children that have been associated with DICER1 mutations. Epidemiology The entity is rare: a systematic review of the literature in 2015 identified fewer than 50 reported cases 2. The mean age of presentation is 10 year...
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Choriocarcinoma

Choriocarcinoma is an aggressive, highly vascular tumor. When it is associated with gestation, it is often considered part of the spectrum of gestational trophoblastic disease; it is then termed gestational choriocarcinoma. When it occurs in the absence of preceding gestation, it is termed non-g...
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Choroid plexus malignancy

Choroid plexus malignancies can be classified as primary or secondary neoplasms of the choroid plexus: Primary tumors choroid plexus papilloma (WHO grade I or II "atypical")  choroid plexus carcinoma (WHO Grade III) intraventricular meningioma Secondary tumors choroid plexus metastases Th...
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Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma is one of the less common subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Epidemiology This is the least common major subtype of RCC, occurring 5% of the time 1. Similar incidence in men and women. Pathology This type of RCC arises from intercalated cells of collecti...
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Chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the proliferation of mostly mature but abnormal leukocytes.  Epidemiology Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is considered the most common type of leukemia in the Western hemisphere; its prevalence in Europe and North ...
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Chronic myeloid leukemia

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), also known as chronic myelogenous leukemia, is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by the overproduction of granulocytes with fairly normal differentiation. Epidemiology The annual incidence is about 1 per 100,000 1,3. The typical age at presentation is ...
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Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a relatively rare clonal hematologic disorder. In the World Health Organization classification, it is listed as a disorder with features of both myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms. Clinical presentation Can be variable but many ...
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Chylous ascites

Chylous ascites (also known as chyloperitoneum) is defined as the abnormal intraperitoneal accumulation of milky lymphatic fluid with a triglyceride level >110 mg/dL 1. Etiologically it is due to a disruption of the lymphatic system, most commonly obstructive due to a mass or traumatic (which ma...
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Circulating tumor cells

Circulating tumor cells (CTC's) refer to cells that have shed into the blood stream or lymphatics from a primary tumor. They are thought constitute "seeds" for the subsequent development of metastases. History and etymology They were first observed in blood in a patient with metastatic cancer ...
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Circumferential resection margin

Circumferential resection margin (CRM) is a term used to denote the standard plane of excision of total mesorectal excision, used for resection of rectal cancers. The anatomic correlate is the mesorectal fascia. The distance between tumor tissue or satellite tumor deposits and the mesorectal fas...
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Clavicle tumors

Clavicle tumors may be malignant or benign. Malignant metastases prostate breast cervix ovary urinary bladder carcinoid osteosarcoma osteosarcoma lymphoma primary metastatic Benign osteoma: uncommon, sclerotic, hamartomatous surface lesion enchondroma: rare, geographic, intramedu...
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Clear cell meningioma

Clear cell meningiomas are a histological variant of meningioma with poorer prognosis and a higher rate of recurrence. They are therefore considered WHO grade 2 tumors, regardless of mitotic index, cellular atypia/anaplasia, or presence of brain invasion.  Epidemiology Clear cell meningiomas h...
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Clear cell renal cell carcinoma

Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of renal cell carcinoma.  Epidemiology The average age of onset of sporadic clear cell renal carcinoma is 61 years-old. In cases associated with Von Hippel-Lindau disease the average age of onset is 37 years 1. Clinical presentation Pat...
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Clear cell sarcoma of the kidney

Clear cell sarcomas of the kidney (CCSK) are a rare mesenchymal renal tumor that account for ~5% of primary renal neoplasms in the pediatric population 1.  Epidemiology Clear cell sarcoma of the kidney is the second most common primary malignant pediatric renal neoplasm after Wilms tumor, with...
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Clear cell tumor of the lung

Clear cell tumors of the lung are rare benign pulmonary neoplasms that contain an abundant amount of glycogen. It is often classified under the spectrum of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas). Radiographic features Usually seen as a rounded, smooth-walled, and peripheral parenchymal...
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CNS capillary telangiectasia

CNS capillary telangiectasiae(s) are small, asymptomatic low flow vascular lesions of the brain.  Epidemiology As these lesions are asymptomatic, diagnosis usually matches the age of first imaging with MRI, and as such are most frequently found in middle-aged and elderly adults. Their inciden...
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CNS lymphoma

CNS lymphoma refers to the involvement of the central nervous system with lymphoma. It can be broadly divided into primary and secondary, with a number of special types of also recognized.  primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) intravascular lymphoma MALT lymphoma of the dura 5 secondary CNS lymphoma...
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Celiac plexus block

Celiac plexus block under image guidance is an easy and safe percutaneous procedure with good outcomes for pain palliation in patients who have chronic abdominal pain related to the celiac ganglia.  This usually includes patients with advanced cancers, especially from upper abdominal viscera, s...
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Colloid adenocarcinoma of the lung

Colloid adenocarcinoma of the lung is an extremely rare (i.e. only accounting for ~0.2% of all lung cancers) variant of invasive lung adenocarcinoma. Pathology It is histologically characterized by the presence of abundant mucus in the tumor with neoplastic cells seen floating in large pools o...
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Colon polyp

Colon polyps are mucosal outgrowths of the colon wall. They are of interest to physicians and radiologists because of the accepted progression of adenomatous polyps to colon carcinoma. Pathology adenomatous colon polyps tubular polyps tubulovillous polyps villous colon polyps dysplastic co...
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Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract and the second most frequently diagnosed malignancy in adults. CT and MRI are the modalities most frequently used for staging. Surgical resection may be curative although five-year survival rate is 40-50%.  Epidemio...
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Colorectal cancer (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Colorectal cancer, also called colorectal carcinoma (CRC), is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract and the second most frequently diagnosed malignancy in adults. CT and MRI are the modalities most frequently...
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Complications of thoracic radiation therapy

Complications of thoracic radiation therapy have significantly reduced since conventional radiotherapy has been largely replaced by modern conformational techniques. Even though, given the usually high radiation doses required for most thoracic cancers, some degree of collateral effects will be ...
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Composite hemangioendothelioma

Composite hemangioendotheliomas are locally aggressive and rarely metastasizing vascular tumors consisting of different and histologically distinct elements. Epidemiology Composite hemangioendotheliomas are very rare and mostly seen in adults. Women are slightly more commonly affected 1,2. Cl...
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Computed tomography texture analysis

Computed tomography texture analysis (or CTTA) is a method to obtain new useful biomarkers that provide objective and quantitative assessment of tumor heterogeneity by analyzing the differences and patterns within the pixel values of an image. CTs can be worked with as a matrix of numbers, corre...
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Congenital heart disease chest x-ray (an approach)

With the advent of echocardiography, and cardiac CT and MRI, the role of chest x-rays in evaluating congenital heart disease has been largely been relegated to one of historical and academic interest, although they continue to crop up in radiology exams. In most instances a definite diagnosis ca...
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Congenital neuroblastoma

Congenital neuroblastoma is defined as neuroblastoma identified within a month of birth, and is divided into: fetal neuroblastoma neonatal neuroblastoma In most cases they present as stage 1, 2 or 4S (see neuroblastoma staging). Fetal neuroblastoma In 90% of cases, fetal neuroblastomas aris...
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Conventional radiation therapy

Conventional (2D) radiation therapy refers to the old techniques of radiation therapy where treatments would be planned by defining a limited number of beams with the boundaries delineated on orthogonal x-rays of the patient. It has been largely replaced by other highly conformal external beam r...
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Cortically-based brain tumors (mnemonic)

A handy mnemonic to recall cortically-based brain tumors is: PDOG DOG Pee Mnemonic P: pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma D: dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET); desmoplastic infantile astrocytoma and ganglioglioma O: oligodendroglioma G: ganglioglioma
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Cotswolds-modified Ann Arbor classification

The Cotswolds-modified Ann Arbor classification is a lymphoma staging classification system for both Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. They came about in 1988 following recommended modifications to the Ann Arbor staging system after a meeting in Cotswold, England. This classification h...
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CT angiogram sign (lungs)

The CT angiogram sign refers to vessels appearing prominent during a contrast enhanced CT as they traverse an airless low attenuation portion of consolidated lung. Although initially thought to be specific for bronchoalveolar carcinoma, it has now been recognized as a generic appearance provided...
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CT guided thoracic biopsy

CT guided thoracic biopsy is usually performed for the diagnosis of suspicious lung, pleural, or mediastinal lesions. It can be performed as an outpatient procedure where patient monitoring and complications support are available.  A small percentage of lung and pleural biopsies may be performed...
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Curtain sign (vertebral body mass)

The curtain sign, also known as the draped curtain sign, in neuroimaging refers to the appearance of a vertebral body mass that extends posteriorly towards the anterior epidural space. The posterior longitudinal ligament is strongly attached to the posterior vertebral body cortex in the midline...
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Cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases

Cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases are not uncommon, occurring in ~5% (range 0.7-10.4%) of internal malignancies, and representing 2% of skin cancers. The Sister Mary Joseph nodule is a well known cutaneous metastasis. Pathology These metastases can come from hematogenous or lymphatic sprea...
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Cutaneous carcinoma of the head and neck (staging)

Cutaneous carcinoma of the head and neck staging refers to TNM staging of nonmelanoma skin cancer involving the scalp, external ear, neck, or face including external lips. The system applies to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and numerous other skin carcinomas, notably excluding eyelid carcino...
Article

CyberKnife

CyberKnife® is a stereotactic radiotherapy system which uses a compact linear accelerator mounted on a robotic arm, coupled with a digital x-ray image guidance system.  The robotic arm allows movement with many degrees of freedom compared to typical linear accelerators which only rotate around t...
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Cystic adrenal neoplasm

Cystic adrenal neoplasms are uncommon and only account for a minority of cystic adrenal lesions 3. They may be represented several histological types: adrenal adenoma 1 adrenal cortical carcinoma 1,2 adrenal epithelioid angiosarcoma 2 pheochromocytoma 1 teratoma (pediatric population) 4 Di...
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Cystic glioblastoma

Cystic glioblastoma is a descriptive term for one form of glioblastoma that contains a large cystic component, rather than being a pathological subtype.  Please refer to the main article on glioblastoma for a broad discussion on this tumor.  Radiographic features The main challenge in discrim...
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Cystic lesions of the pancreas (differential)

The differential for cystic lesions of the pancreas includes: unilocular pancreatic pseudocyst intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) serous cystadenoma uncommonly uni/macrolocular simple pancreatic cyst pancreatic cysts occur in association with  von Hippel Lindau syndrome autos...
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Cystic meningioma

The term cystic meningioma is applied to both meningiomas with intratumoral degenerative cyst formation as well as those with peritumoral arachnoid cysts or reactive intraparenchymal cysts.  They should not be confused with microcystic meningiomas, a distinct variant, in which the cysts are mic...
Article

Cystic (necrotic) lymph nodes

Cystic or necrotic appearing lymph nodes can be caused by a number of infectious, inflammatory or malignant conditions: Systemic squamous cell carcinoma metastases treated lymphoma leukemia plasmacytoid T-cell leukemia acute myeloid leukemia viral lymphadenitis herpes simplex lymphadenit...
Article

Cystic pulmonary metastases

Cystic pulmonary metastases are atypical morphological form on pulmonary metastases where lesions manifest as distinct cystic lesions. It is slightly different from the term cavitating pulmonary metastases in that the lesions are extremely thin walled. Pathology It has been reported with many ...
Article

Deauville five-point scale

The Deauville five-point scale (Deauville 5PS) is an internationally-recommended scale for routine clinical reporting and clinical trials using FDG PET-CT in the initial staging and assessment of treatment response in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and certain types of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL).  Incl...
Article

Dedifferentiated liposarcoma

Dedifferentiated liposarcomas (DDLPS) are malignant adipocytic soft tissue neoplasms that have progressed from primary or recurrent atypical lipomatous tumors/well-differentiated liposarcomas and are characterized by a much higher rate of recurrence, metastasis in about ¼ of the cases and a much...
Article

Deep inguinal lymph nodes

The deep inguinal lymph nodes (often shortened to the deep inguinal nodes) form a subgroup of the inguinal lymph node group, and are located within the femoral sheath, medial to the femoral vein. They receive afferent lymphatic drainage from the deep lymphatics of the distal lower extremity and ...
Article

Dense hilum sign

The dense hilum sign suggests a pathological process at the hilum or in the lung anterior or posterior to the hilum. Malignancy, especially lung cancer, should be suspected. Radiographic features On a well-centered chest posteroanterior (PA) radiograph the density of the hilum is comparable on...
Article

Denver shunt

A Denver shunt, or peritoneovenous shunt, is a device used to shunt ascites to the superior vena cava in patients with refractory ascites. The proximal end is located in the peritoneal cavity and the distal end in the superior vena cava, with a subcutaneous course in the anterior chest wall. It...
Article

Dermal nerve sheath myxoma

Dermal nerve sheath myxomas are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors usually originating from the skin or subcutaneous tissues. Terminology The previous term was ‘classic or myxoid variant of neurothekeoma’ but recent data has shown that they are biologically and clinically distinct from neur...
Article

Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans

Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a low-grade malignant tumor arising from dermal and subcutaneous tissues and is the most common cutaneous sarcoma (although overall still quite rare). It is most commonly found at the trunk and proximal extremities 6. Its behavior is notable for a high ...
Article

Dermatomyositis

Dermatomyositis is an autoimmune inflammatory myositis, which like its closely-related condition polymyositis, carries an increased risk of malignancy. Epidemiology There is a recognized female predilection. It has a bimodal age of presentation depending on the variant: juvenile dermatomyosit...

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