Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

888 results found
Article

Desmoid tumor

Desmoid tumors are benign, non-inflammatory fibroblastic tumors with a tendency for local invasion and recurrence but without metastasis. Terminology The terms desmoid tumor and aggressive fibromatosis are occasionally used synonymously by some authors 9. This article will focus on the abdomin...
Article

Desmoplasia

Desmoplasia (also known as a desmoplastic reaction) is the term used by pathologists to refer to the growth of fibrous tissue around disease, usually cancer. However in dermatopathology, desmoplasia may also be seen with benign, as well as malignant, conditions. Terminology Pathologists prefer...
Article

Desmoplastic fibroma

Desmoplastic fibromas are extremely rare bone tumors that do not metastasize but may be locally aggressive. They are considered to be a bony counterpart of soft tissue desmoid tumors and are histologically identical.  Epidemiology Desmoplastic fibroma of bone is rare and mostly found in young ...
Article

Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (peritoneal)

Desmoplastic small round cell tumors of the peritoneum are a rare and highly aggressive primary peritoneal malignancy. Epidemiology Desmoplastic small round cell tumor is usually seen in young adolescents and have a male predominance with a mean survival of 2-3 years. Clinical presentation A...
Article

Diabetic mastopathy

Diabetic mastopathy is a condition characterized by the presence of a benign tumor like breast masses in women with long-standing type 1 or type 2 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The condition has also been reported in men. A similar condition is lymphocytic mastitis but this occurs in non-...
Article

DICER1 syndrome

DICER1 syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder predisposing individual to the development of multiple tumor types. DICER1 is considered a tumor suppressor gene that encodes the endoribonuclease protein Dicer. The first association with pleuropulmonary blastoma was discovered in 2009. Ass...
Article

Differential for an anterosuperior mediastinal mass

An anterosuperior mediastinal mass can be caused by neoplastic and non-neoplastic pathology. As their name suggests, they are confined to the anterior mediastinum, that portion of the mediastinum anterior to the pericardium and below the level of the clavicles.  The differential diagnosis for a...
Article

Diffuse astrocytoma

Diffuse astrocytomas, also referred to as low-grade infiltrative astrocytomas, are designated as WHO II tumors of the brain. The term diffuse infiltrating means there is no identifiable border between the tumor and normal brain tissue, even though the borders may appear well-marginated on imagin...
Article

Diffuse bony sclerosis (mnemonic)

Useful mnemonics for remembering causes of diffuse bony sclerosis include: 3 M's PROOF Regular Sex Makes Occasional Perversions Much More Pleasurable And Fantastic 1 Mnemonics 3 M's PROOF M: malignancy metastases (osteoblastic metastases) lymphoma leukemia M: myelofibrosis M: mastocyto...
Article

Diffuse brainstem gliomas

Diffuse brainstem gliomas, also known as diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma (DIBG), is a term used to describe infiltrating astrocytomas, no longer recognized as a distinct entity in the 2016 update to the WHO classification of CNS tumors. It encompassed a variety of tumors, ranging from WHO gra...
Article

Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia

Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) is an extremely rare pulmonary disorder at the benign end of the neuroendocrine cells proliferation spectrum. It is mainly seen in non-smoker middle-age females with a history of chronic cough or asthma. On imaging, it is cha...
Article

Diffuse large B cell lymphoma

Diffuse large B cell lymphoma is the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Epidemiology Associations Diffuse large B cell lymphoma is sometimes associated with immunodeficiency, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Pathology Classification In 2016 WHO classification of lymp...
Article

Diffusely increased bone marrow FDG uptake

A diffuse homogeneous bone marrow FDG uptake usually reflects hyperplastic bone marrow which can be seen in the following conditions: therapy-related granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) post-chemotherapy erythropoietin pathological process myelodysplastic syndromes beta-thalasse...
Article

Distal appendicular skeletal metastases

Distal appendicular skeletal metastases, especially distal to the knee and elbow joints, are uncommon. Clinical presentation Localized pain and swelling, along with pathological fractures, are the most common 3.  Pathology Etiology Malignancies that most commonly spread to appendicular skel...
Article

Distal cholangiocarcinoma (staging)

Distal cholangiocarcinoma staging is defined according to the TNM staging classification of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/Union for International Cancer Control (UICC). As of 2018, the staging criteria are in their 8th edition and reflected below 1. These criteria apply to cancer...
Article

DNA

DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is a nucleic acid which contains the genetic information necessary for RNA (ribonucleic acid) and protein biosynthesis 1. Molecular structure DNA is made up of two double-stranded polynucleotide chains. Each nucleotide consists of a pentose, 2-deoxy-D-ribose, to whi...
Article

Drash syndrome

Drash syndrome, also known as the Denys-Drash syndrome, is associated with an abnormal WT1 gene (Wilms tumor gene) and consists of: Wilms tumor male pseudohermaphroditism progressive glomerulonephritis
Article

Ductal adenoma of the breast

A ductal adenoma of the breast is a benign glandular tumor of the breast that usually fills and distends the ductal lumen. Epidemiology They may occur in women of all ages, although the majority of patients are 60 years of age or greater 3. Clinical presentation Ductal adenomas usually prese...
Article

Ductal carcinoma in situ

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) refers to a breast carcinoma limited to the ducts with no extension beyond the basement membrane, as a result of which the disease has not infiltrated the parenchyma of the breast and the lymphatics and cannot therefore metastasize. Epidemiology The detection of...
Article

Duodenal adenocarcinoma

Duodenal adenocarcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the duodenum. Epidemiology Adenocarcinoma is the most common primary malignant neoplasm of the duodenum. It represents 0.3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies and accounts for  50-70% of small bowel adenocarcinomas occurring ei...
Article

Duodenal filling defects

Duodenal filling defects may be caused by a wide variety of duodenal pathology which may be divided by their location and pathological process. Extrinsic gallbladder impression common bile duct impression gas-filled diverticulum Intrinsic Note: please refer to duodenal mucosal nodular fill...
Article

Dural metastases

Dural or pachymeningeal metastases are a relatively common cause of dural masses, although they are less common than brain metastases and meningiomas. They can occur both within the spine and intracranially - this article is focused on intracranial dural masses.  Clinical presentation Patients...
Article

Dural tail sign (mnemonic)

A useful mnemonic to remember differential diagnoses associated with a dural tail sign is: My Scary Dog Likes To Stand Guard Mnemonic M: meningioma S: sarcoidosis D: dural metastases L: lymphoma T: tuberculoma S: schwannoma G: glioma
Article

Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor

Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNET) are benign (WHO Grade I) slow growing glioneuronal tumors arising from either cortical or deep grey matter. The vast majority are centered in cortical grey matter, arise from secondary germinal layers, and are frequently associated with cortical dys...
Article

Dysplastic liver nodules

Dysplastic liver nodules are focal nodular regions (≥1 mm) without definite evidence of malignancy. Epidemiology They have been found in cirrhotic patients with a prevalence of 14% (size >1.0 cm) to 37% (size >0.5 cm) 2. Associations cirrhosis Pathology Dysplasia indicates: nuclear atypia...
Article

EBV associated smooth muscle tumor

Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumors (EBV-SMT) are rare and encountered in immunocompromised individuals. Epidemiology These tumors are generally exceedingly rare, and only seen with any frequency in the setting of immunosuppression, particularly in HIV/AIDS patients, but also po...
Article

ECOG performance status

The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) is one of the largest clinical cancer research organizations in the United States and conducts clinical trials in all types of adult cancers. The ECOG performance status is a scale used to assess how a patient's disease is progressing, assess how th...
Article

Ectomesenchymoma

Ectomesenchymomas are biphasic or composite malignant soft tissue tumors with rhabdomyosarcoma resembling parts and neuronal or neuroblastic features. Terminology The term ‘gangliorhabdomyosarcoma’ is not recommended anymore. Epidemiology Ectomesenchymomas are very rare and usually occur in ...
Article

EGFR mutation

Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation can be expressed in a large proportion of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). However, certain subtypes such as invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma of the lung can have very low expression. The presence of this mutation can be assessed on biopsy...
Article

Electron therapy

Electron therapy, or electron beam therapy, is a form of radiotherapy which is used to treat superficial lesions. Electron beams are rapidly attenuated by soft tissue and thus can only treat to a depth of a few centimeters (typically 0-3 cm), compared to megavoltage x-rays which are much more pe...
Article

Elevated vitamin B12

Elevated vitamin B12 (also known as hypervitaminosis B12 or hypercobalaminemia) is most important as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for malignant disease 1,3. Very high serum levels of vitamin B12, following dietary megadosing, does not seem to have any observable deleterious effects 2. 
Article

Endobronchial metastases (mnemonic)

Primary neoplasms which may result in endobronchial metastases may be memorized by utilizing the following mnemonic: Kiss My RBC 1  Mnemonic K: Kaposi sarcoma M: melanoma R: renal cell carcinoma B: breast cancer C: colorectal carcinoma, cervical carcinoma, carcinoid See also endobronchi...
Article

Endometrial carcinoma

Endometrial carcinoma is generally considered the most common gynecological malignancy. It frequently presents with vaginal bleeding. Both ultrasound and pelvic MRI are useful modalities for evaluation. Epidemiology Endometrial carcinoma is the most common gynecological malignancy, with peak i...
Article

Endometrial hyperplasia

Endometrial hyperplasia is an abnormal proliferation of the endometrial glands and stroma, defined as diffuse smooth thickening >10 mm 13. One of the major concerns is the potential malignant transformation to endometrial carcinoma. Epidemiology Endometrial hyperplasia affects women of all age...
Article

Endosteal scalloping

Endosteal scalloping refers to the focal resorption of the inner layer of the cortex (i.e. the endosteum) of bones, most typically long bones, due to slow-growing medullary lesions. It is important to note that although it is evidence of a slow non-infiltrative lesion, it does not equate to ben...
Article

Engraftment syndrome

Engraftment syndrome (ES) refers to a potential early complication of haematopoetic stem cell transplantation. It is thought to be related to increased capillary permeability and comprises of a combination of symptoms and signs which include fever erythrodermatous skin rash noncardiogenic pul...
Article

Eosinophil

Eosinophils, also less commonly known as acidophils, are myeloid granulocytes and form one of the main types of white blood cells. Their counts are routinely measured as part of a full blood count. They have important roles in fighting parasitic infections, but are increasingly recognized as hav...
Article

Ependymoma

Ependymomas represent a relatively broad group of glial tumors most often arising from the lining the ventricles of the brain or the central canal of the spinal cord. They account for ~5% of all neuroepithelial neoplasms, ~10% of all pediatric brain tumors and up to 33% of brain tumors occurring...
Article

Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma of lung

Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma of lung is a very rare type of lung carcinomas of the salivary gland type. Pathology Diagnosis is based on the identification of myoepithelial cells, with spindle cells, clear cells, or plasmacytoid differentiation or a mixture of phenotypes, along with a var...
Article

Epithelioid hemangioma

Epithelioid hemangiomas are benign vascular neoplasms made of epithelioid endothelial cell morphology usually seen in cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues. Terminology Epithelioid hemangiomas were known as angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia. Epidemiology They have been observed in all...
Article

Epithelioid hemangioma of bone

Epithelioid hemangiomas of bone are benign intraosseous vascular neoplasms of epithelioid morphology which show locally aggressive behavior. Epidemiology Epithelioid hemangiomas of bone are uncommon tumors with an unknown incidence. They have been observed in all age groups, with men being sli...
Article

Epithelioid sarcoma

Epithelioid sarcomas are malignant usually slow-growing mesenchymal tumors of unknown and multidirectional differentiation. There are classic and proximal subtypes. Epidemiology Epithelioid sarcomas are rare and make up for <1% of soft tissue sarcomas 1,2. They are found in children and adults...
Article

Esophageal and esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (staging)

Esophageal and esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma staging refers to TNM staging of adenocarcinoma originating in the esophagus or esophagogastric junction (including tumors whose center is within the proximal 2 cm of the gastric cardia). Related histologies included in this system are high...
Article

Esophageal and esophagogastric junction neuroendocrine tumor (staging)

Esophageal and esophagogastric junction neuroendocrine tumor staging refers to TNM staging of epithelial cancers other than the squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma groups located in the esophagus or esophagogastric junction (including tumors whose center is within the proximal 2 cm of the...
Article

Esophageal and esophagogastric junction squamous cell carcinoma (staging)

Esophageal and esophagogastric junction squamous cell carcinoma staging refers to TNM staging of squamous cell carcinoma originating in the esophagus or esophagogastric junction (including tumors whose center is within the proximal 2 cm of the gastric cardia). Related histologies included in th...
Article

Ewing sarcoma

Ewing sarcomas are the second most common malignant primary bone tumors of childhood after osteosarcoma, typically arising from the medullary cavity with the invasion of the Haversian system. They usually present as moth-eaten destructive permeative lucent lesions in the shaft of long bones with...
Article

Ewing sarcoma family of tumors

The Ewing sarcoma family of tumors are a group of small round blue cell tumors that are closely histogenetically related, all demonstrating non-random t(11;22)(q24;q12) chromosome rearrangement resulting in the formation of the EWS-ETS fusion gene 1-3.  Terminology Although the literature is l...
Article

Exophytic

Exophytic is a descriptive term used by radiologists/pathologists to describe solid organ lesions arising from the outer surface of the organ of origin. Literally exophytic only refers to those lesions arising from the outer surface, however radiologists and pathologists use the term to include...
Article

External beam radiotherapy

External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (also known as teletherapy) is a form of ionizing radiation therapy delivered by a medical linear accelerator (or historically a cobalt-60 source) to a patient lying on a treatment bed. Megavoltage x-rays (4-25 MV) are the most commonly used. Alternative forms o...
Article

Extramammary Paget disease

Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is the rarer non-breast form of Paget disease of the nipple. It is considered a form of adenocarcinoma of the apocrine glandular tissue. In men, the penis and scrotum are most frequently involved, and in women the vulva. Nodal and distant organ metastatic diseas...
Article

Extramedullary hematopoiesis

Extramedullary hematopoiesis is a response to the failure of erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This article aims to a general approach on the condition, for a dedicated discussion for a particularly involved organ, please refer to the specific articles on:  extramedullary hematopoiesis in the...
Article

Extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen

Extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen represents a physiologic compensatory event that may be seen in many hematologic diseases leading to chronic anemia. The liver and the spleen are the most common site of extramedullary hematopoiesis, both usually manifesting on imaging as organomegaly a...
Article

Extranodal extension

Extranodal extension refers to the growth of a nodal cancer metastasis beyond the confines of the capsule of a lymph node into adjacent tissues. Less preferred synonyms include extranodal spread, extracapsular extension, or extracapsular spread. This finding holds prognostic implications. For e...
Article

Extraprostatic extension of prostate cancer

Extraprostatic (extracapsular) extension of prostate cancer refers to local tumor growth beyond the fibromuscular pseudocapsule of the prostate gland into the periprostatic soft tissues, in particular, the periprostatic fat and is an established adverse prognostic factor and of importance for pr...
Article

Extrarenal rhabdoid tumor

Extrarenal rhabdoid tumors also known as rhabdoid tumors of soft tissue or malignant rhabdoid tumors are highly malignant neoplasms of uncertain differentiation mainly seen in infants and children. Epidemiology Extrarenal rhabdoid tumors are very rare and most are found in infants and children...
Article

F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose

F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the most common PET radiotracer. Structure The radiopharmaceutical consists of the fluorine-18 radionuclide substituting the hydroxyl group at the C-2 position of glucose. The IUPAC chemical name is 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoroglucose. Production F-18 fluoride ion ...
Article

Facial nerve schwannoma

Facial nerve schwannoma, also known as facial nerve neuroma/neurilemoma, is a schwannoma that arises from the facial nerve. They are generally uncommon, and when involving the temporal bone, make up less than 1% of all temporal bone tumors. Epidemiology Facial nerve schwannoma is a rare tumor ...
Article

Familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome

Familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome (FAPS) is characterized by the presence of hundreds of adenomatous polyps in the colon. It is the most common of the polyposis syndromes. Terminology Familial polyposis coli, attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis and Gardner syndrome are all variants...
Article

Familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome

Familial atypical multiple mole melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by multiple melanocytic nevi (often more than 50) and a family history of melanoma. Pathology Genetics It is associated with mutations in the CDKN2A gene and shows reduced penetranc...
Article

Fascicular sign

Fascicular sign is a finding on T2-weighted MRI images that suggests a lesion of neurogenic origin. It is characterized by multiple small ring-like structures with peripheral hyperintensity representing the fascicular bundles within the nerves. It is found in various neurogenic tumors, includin...
Article

Fat containing brain lesions

Intracranial fat is uncommon and a wide range of differentials should be considered. Neoplastic intracranial dermoid cyst intracranial teratoma intracranial lipoma pericallosal lipoma quadrigeminal cistern lipoma suprasellar cistern lipoma cerebellopontine angle lipoma choroid plexus li...
Article

Fetal adenocarcinoma of the lung

Fetal adenocarcinoma of the lung (FLAC) is a rare form of adenocarcinoma of lung (falls under invasive category). Epidemiology Some reports suggest its occurence at ~0.1%-0.5% of all pulmonary neoplasms 1.  Despite its "fetal" tissue morphology it typically presents in middle aged to elderly p...
Article

Fetal cardiac tumors

Fetal cardiac tumors refer to primary cardiac tumors that can present in the in utero population.  Epidemiology Fetal cardiac tumors are rare; the prevalence, reported from autopsy studies of patients of all ages, varies from 0.0017-0.28 % 2. Pathology Known cardiac tumor types that present ...
Article

Fibrinous pericarditis

Fibrinous pericarditis results from fine granular roughening of the pericardium. Clinical presentation Pericardial friction rub may be heard. Pathology Causes viral acute idiopathic tuberculosis pyogenic acute rheumatic fever myocardial infarction: Dressler syndrome chronic renal fail...
Article

Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma

Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma is a distinct histological variant of hepatocellular carcinoma characterized on microscopy by laminated fibrous layers between the tumor cells. It is important as it has different demographics and risk factors compared to 'standard' hepatocellular carcinoma...
Article

Fibrosarcoma

Fibrosarcomas are malignant tumors of fibroblast origin. They are a type of soft tissue sarcoma that can be grouped by the patient age, i.e. adult fibrosarcoma and infantile fibrosarcoma, and/or anatomical region, for example: fibrosarcoma of the breast fibrosarcoma of the chest wall fibrosar...
Article

Fibrosarcoma of the breast

Fibrosarcoma of the breast is a type of malignant stromal sarcoma that rarely occurs as a primary tumor within the breast.  Pathology A fibrosarcoma is composed of immature mesenchymal elements surrounded by a collagenous substance. It is a type of breast sarcoma with a predominant “herringbon...
Article

FIGO staging system

The FIGO staging systems are determined by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d’Obstétrique). In general, there are five stages: stage 0: carcinoma in situ (common in cervical, vaginal, and vulval cancer) stage I: confined to...
Article

Finger clubbing

Finger clubbing, also called "drumstick fingers", is a common clinical sign in patients with heart or lung disease. The term is used to describe an enlargement of the distal phalanges of the fingers, giving them a drumstick or club-like appearance.  Clinical Presentation Finger clubbing presen...
Article

Flare phenomenon (bone scintigraphy)

Flare phenomenon or osteoblastic flare phenomenon refers to interval visualization of lesions with a sclerotic rim around an initially lytic lesion or sclerosis of lesions previously undetected on radiograph or CT in the setting of follow-up of an oncological patient with other signs of partial ...
Article

Fluid-fluid levels in bone tumors

Fluid-fluid levels in bone tumors is a commonly encountered finding, both in benign as well as malignant bone tumors, and can be used to differentiate between the two. Measurement On the sagittal T2W image: measure the length of the largest fluid-fluid level (A) measure the maximum length of...
Article

Fluorine-18-labeled sodium fluoride

Fluorine-18-labeled sodium fluoride (also known as 18F-NaF or sodium fluoride) is a PET radiotracer used primarily for skeletal imaging. Structure Fluorine-18-labeled sodium fluoride is an ionic compound comprised of a single sodium atom bound to a positron-emitting isotope of fluorine.  Dist...
Article

Focal gas collection in right upper quadrant (differential)

Focal gas collection in right upper quadrant on plain radiographs can occur from a number of pathologies. Things to consider are: enterobiliary fistula: common types include cholecystoduodenal fistula and cholecystocolic fistula. It may occur with: gallstone ileus (being most common) 3 perfor...
Article

Focal lymphoid hyperplasia of the lung

Focal lymphoid hyperplasia of the lung refers to an abnormal accumulation of non-malignant lymphocytic aggregates within the lung.  Terminology Previously known as pulmonary pseudolymphoma. Clinical presentation Clinical features can vary from being asymptomatic to various symptoms such as w...
Article

Focal sclerotic bony lesions (mnemonic)

A popular mnemonic to help remember causes of focal sclerotic bony lesions is: HOME LIFE Mnemonic H: healed non-ossifying fibroma (NOF) O: osteoma M: metastasis E: Ewing sarcoma L: lymphoma I: infection or infarct F: fibrous dysplasia E: enchondroma
Article

Follicular lymphoma

Follicular lymphoma is the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) Epidemiology Estimated to account for ~45% of all NHL cases 1. Higher rates in North America and Europe 4.  Pathology Nodal effacement by closely packed follicles containing small cleaved cells without nucleoli (cen...
Article

Follicular thyroid cancer

Follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) is the second most frequent malignancy of the thyroid gland after papillary cancer and accounts for 10-20% of all thyroid neoplasms.  Epidemiology It typically occurs in women and in an older age group than papillary (i.e. 40-60 years of age). Pathology Unl...
Article

Fukuoka consensus guidelines

Fukuoka consensus guidelines, also referred to as the Tanaka criteria, is a classification system for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs).  The prior international consensus guidelines (2006) were referred to as the Sendai criteria, which later ...
Article

Gallbladder carcinoma

Gallbladder carcinoma is a term referring to primary epithelial malignancies arising from the gallbladder, in which the great majority (90%) are adenocarcinomas and the remainder are squamous cell carcinomas. They are more prevalent in elderly women and, in most cases, are only symptomatic when ...
Article

Gallbladder malignancy

Gallbladder malignancy (or gallbladder cancer) is relatively uncommon. The commonest histopathological type is carcinoma. Primary gallbladder carcinoma gallbladder adenocarcinoma: most common 1 gallbladder squamous cell carcinoma gallbladder neuroendocrine carcinoma gallbladder sarcoma: ve...
Article

Gallbladder metastases

Gallbladder metastases are rare and usually represent an advanced and end-stage of malignancy. Malignant melanoma and gastric carcinoma account for the most common primary malignancies to see metastases to the gallbladder, in the Western and Asian societies, respectively.  Epidemiology They re...
Article

Gallium-68 DOTATATE

Gallium-68 DOTATATE​​ (or Ga-68 DOTATATE) is a PET radiotracer that is useful for evaluating primary and metastatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors. It is a form of somatostatin-receptor (SSTR) functional imaging and most often combined with cross-sectional imaging in the form of PET-C...
Article

Gamma Knife

Gamma Knife®, also known as Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS), is a form of radiosurgery historically employing 201 cobalt-60 sources arranged in a hemispheric array. The latest system, the Gamma Knife Perfexion™, uses 192 cobalt-60 sources 1. The emitted gamma rays are focused on a target point w...
Article

Ganglioglioma

Gangliogliomas are uncommon, usually low-grade, CNS tumors. Epilepsy is a common clinical presentation and this tumor has a typical occurrence in the temporal lobes, although they have been described in all parts of the central nervous system. Their appearance on imaging is very variable: from ...
Article

Gastric adenocarcinoma

Gastric adenocarcinoma, commonly, although erroneously, referred to as gastric cancer, refers to a primary malignancy arising from the gastric epithelium. It is the most common gastric malignancy. It is the third most common GI malignancy following colon and pancreatic carcinoma.  Epidemiology ...
Article

Gastric cancer (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Gastric cancer, also known as stomach cancer or gastric carcinoma, refers to a cancer that arises from the mucosal lining of the stomach. It is the commonest gastric malignancy. Reference article This is a summary article...
Article

Gastric lymphoma

Gastric lymphoma may either represent secondary involvement by systemic disease or primary malignancy confined to the stomach.  Epidemiology  Gastric lymphoma represents the most common site of extranodal lymphoma, accounting for 25% of all such lymphomas, 50% of all gastrointestinal lymphomas...
Article

Gastric metastases

Gastric metastases are rare, found in less than 2% of patients who die of a carcinoma 6. Epidemiology Usually affects the middle-aged and elderly population. Affects males and females equally without predilection. Clinical presentation The patient may be asymptomatic, but the most common sig...
Article

Gastrointestinal stromal tumor

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. They account for ~5% of all sarcomas, and are mostly found within stomach and mid-distal small bowel. They respond remarkably well to chemotherapy. Terminology Previously these tumors ...
Article

Generalized osteopenia

Generalized osteopenia refers to osteopenia diffusely affecting the bones. Differential diagnosis The differential diagnosis is wide and includes: osteoporosis: decreased osteoid production osteomalacia: undermineralisation of osteoid hyperparathyroidism multiple myeloma diffuse metastase...
Article

Germ cell tumor (classification)

Germ cell tumors are classified into two broad groups: seminoma and non-seminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT). The later is then divided further according to histology: seminoma non-seminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT) embryonal cell carcinoma choriocarcinoma  yolk sac tumor teratoma  mi...
Article

Germ cell tumors (mnemonic)

A mnemonic for the differential diagnosis for germ cell tumors is: SECTE Mnemonic S: seminoma E: embryonal cell carcinoma C: choriocarcinoma T: teratoma E: endodermal sinus tumor (yolk sac tumor)
Article

Gestational trophoblastic disease

Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) results from the abnormal proliferation of trophoblastic tissue and encompasses a wide spectrum of diseases, including: hydatidiform mole complete mole partial mole coexistent molar pregnancy invasive mole ~10% choriocarcinoma (gestational choriocarc...

Updating… Please wait.

 Unable to process the form. Check for errors and try again.

 Thank you for updating your details.