Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

818 results found
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Horseshoe kidney

Horseshoe kidneys are the most common type of renal fusion anomaly. They render the kidneys susceptible to trauma and are an independent risk factor for the development of renal calculi and transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis. Epidemiology Horseshoe kidneys are found in approximate...
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Hutch diverticulum

Hutch diverticula are congenital bladder diverticula, seen at the vesicoureteric junction, in the absence of posterior urethral valves or neurogenic bladder. They are thought to result from a weakness in the detrusor muscle anterolateral to the ureteral orifice. Epidemiology They occur almost...
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Hydrocele

Hydroceles are acquired or congenital serous fluid collections between the layers of the tunica vaginalis surrounding a testis or spermatic cord. They are the most common form of "testicular" enlargement and present with painless enlargement of the scrotum. On all modalities, hydroceles appear a...
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Hydrocele of the canal of Nuck

Hydrocele of the canal of Nuck is a rare condition in female children caused by a failure of complete obliteration of the canal of Nuck 1. The canal of Nuck is an abnormal patent pouch of peritoneum extending anterior to the round ligament of the uterus into the labia majora 2. Incomplete oblite...
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Hydronephrosis

Hydronephrosis is defined as dilatation of the urinary collecting system of the kidney (the calyces, the infundibula, and the pelvis) 1. The term hydroureteronephrosis (or hydronephroureterosis) is used when the dilatation also involves the ureter.  Hydronephrosis in fetuses and newborns has sp...
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Hydronephrosis (grading)

Grading systems of hydronephrosis have been devised to communicate the degree of upper collecting system dilatation. The most common system used (Society of Fetal Ultrasound, SFU) was originally designed for grading neonatal and infant hydronephrosis: grade 0 no dilatation, calyceal walls are ...
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Hymen

The hymen (plural: hymens) is a thin fold of mucous membrane which extends across the vaginal opening, usually with some form of internal defect, which permits the free passage of normal menses.  It usually ruptures during coitus with the remnants, usually in the form of small tags of tissue ar...
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Hyperdense renal cyst

Benign hyperattenuating renal cysts are also known as hyperdense renal cysts. Epidemiology They are frequently found in patients with either acquired cystic renal disease or autosomal dominant polycystic renal disease 1. Radiographic features homogeneously hyperattenuating (even when a narro...
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Hyperparathyroidism

Hyperparathyroidism is the effect of excess parathyroid hormone in the body. It can be primary, secondary, or tertiary. There are many characteristic imaging features, predominantly involving the skeletal system. Pathology Increased levels of the parathyroid hormone lead to increased osteoclas...
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Hyper-reninaemic hypertension (differential)

Hyper-reninaemic hypertension may have many causes including: renal artery stenosis renal secreting tumour, e.g. renal cell carcinoma, reninoma renal compression: large renal mass, subcapsular haemorrhage (Page kidney)
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Hypertrophied column of Bertin

Columns of Bertin represent the extension of renal cortical tissue which separates the pyramids, and as such are normal structures. They become of radiographic importance when they are unusually enlarged and may be mistaken for a renal mass (renal pseudotumour). Nomenclature of such enlarged co...
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Hypogastric Nerves

The hypogastric nerves are paired nerve bundles that are part of the autonomic nervous system and located in the pelvis.  Summary location: pelvis origin: contain sympathetic fibres descending from the superior hypogastric plexus and parasympathetic fibres ascending from the inferior hypogast...
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Hypospadias

Hypospadias refers to a type of congenital malformation affecting the male external genitalia. Epidemiology The estimated prevalence is ~2 (range 0.2-4.1) per 1000 live births. Pathology The urethral meatus is abnormally positioned proximally and ventrally to its normal position. It is thou...
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Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis

Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF) is a subtype of retroperitoneal fibrosis where no obvious cause is found. It includes a spectrum of diseases which are characterized by fibroinflammatory tissue encasing the abdominal aorta and the iliac arteries. This process may extend into the retrope...
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Idiopathic scrotal calcinosis

Idiopathic scrotal calcinosis (ISC), sometimes called dystrophic scrotal calcinosis,  is a rare benign condition characterized by superficial calcifications within the skin of the scrotum of unclear aetiology, typically affecting men aged 20-40 years. The condition is primarily cosmetic, but may...
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IgA nephropathy

IgA nephropathy (also known as IgA nephritis or Berger disease) is a form of glomerulonephritis.  Epidemiology IgA nephropathy is considered the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide and is a leading cause of chronic kidney disease and renal failure. Pathology Primary IgA nephropathy is c...
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Ileal conduit

An ileal conduit (or "Bricker conduit") was one of the original types of urinary diversions, and it is still in use today. The conduit is most often placed after cystectomy (or cystoprostatectomy) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Although not a continent diversion, it may be preferred if the...
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Ileal ureter interposition

Ileal ureter interpositions are uncommon urologic reconstructions, using a loop of small bowel to replace a damaged ureter. The concept is similar to the formation of a neobladder from small bowel (e.g. ileal conduit), except one is forming a neo-ureter. Variants include using colon as an inter...
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Ileovesicostomy

Ileovesicostomy (also known as "cutaneous ileocystostomy", "ileal chimney", or "bladder chimney") is an uncommon urologic diversion in which a loop of small bowel is anastomosed/augmented to the dome of the bladder. This loop of bowel then exits through a urostomy. The diversion is not continent...
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Imperforate hymen

Imperforate hymen is a congenital condition in which the hymen lacks a normal opening. Epidemiology It happens in 0.1% of the female population, usually an isolated finding.  Clinical features Primary amenorrhea with cyclic lower abdominal pain during menarche age. An imperforate hymen can b...
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Incidentaloma

An incidentaloma is a radiological neologism to denote a lesion found incidentally and of dubious clinical significance. Although it can refer to any incidental lesion (e.g. pituitary 3, thyroid 4), it is most often used to denote an incidental adrenal lesion, which is commonly an adrenal adenom...
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Increased renal echogenicity

Increased renal echogencity is a nonspecific finding but can represent a number of underlying conditions.  These include: normal variation renal amyloidosis chronic kidney disease: increased cortical echogenicity sickle cell disease 4 See also echogenic renal pyramids - paediatric renal ...
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Inferior adrenal artery

The inferior adrenal (suprarenal) artery is one of three adrenal arteries that supplies the adrenal gland. Gross anatomy Origin Ipsilateral renal artery (usually before the terminal division of the renal artery) Location The course of the inferior suprarenal artery depends on its origin. Re...
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Inferior hypogastric plexus

The inferior hypogastric plexuses are autonomic nerve plexuses located in the pelvis. Summary location: lies in pelvis in extraperitoneal connective tissue on pelvic sidewall anterolateral to the mesorectum origin: formed mainly from pelvic splanchnic branches (parasympathetic) and sacral spl...
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Inferior rectal nerve

The inferior rectal nerve, also known as the inferior anal nerve or inferior hemorrhoidal nerve, is a branch of the pudendal nerve which is derived from S2, S3 and S4 nerve roots of the sacral plexus. The nerve provides sensory innervation to the anal canal inferior to the pectinate line and mot...
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Infertility

Infertility is common, affecting 15-20% of couples, and is defined as the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse in the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle 3. It can be due to a variety of both female and male factors, and these are discussed in separate articles: fema...
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Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour

Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours (IMT), also known as plasma cell granulomas, are rare neoplasms that have a diverse spectrum of biological behaviour.  Terminology These tumours were previously referred as inflammatory pseudotumour.   Epidemiology They can occur at any age and there is c...
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Inguinal canal

The inguinal canal is a passage in the anterior abdominal wall that transmits structures from the pelvis to the perineum formed by the fetal migration of the gonad from the abdomen into the labioscrotal folds. Gross anatomy The inguinal canal has an oblique course, is 4 cm in length and has tw...
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Internal pudendal vein

The internal pudendal veins are the set of accompanying veins to the internal pudendal artery draining the perineal region to empty into the internal iliac vein. Gross Anatomy Tributaries inferior rectal veins males penile bulb and scrotum vein females clitoris and posterior labial vein ...
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International prostate symptom score

The international prostate symptom score (IPSS) is an 8 question (7 symptom questions + 1 quality of life question) screening tool used in screening, diagnosis, symptom tracking and aiding management of the symptoms associated with bladder emptying and is useful in those with benign prostatic hy...
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Intra-abdominal calcification (neonatal)

Intra-abdominal calcification in a neonate can be caused by a number of pathologies that cause calcification within the peritoneal space or within organs. Pathology Aetiology Meconium peritonitis The commonest cause is meconium peritonitis which is the result of aseptic peritonitis secondary...
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Intrarenal reflux

Intrarenal reflux (IRR) involves intrarenal extension of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) into the tubular system of the kidney. IRR occurs in 3-10% of cases and can lead to renal injury, which may eventually result in renal scarring. The condition can be diagnosed by micturating cystourethrography ...
Article

Intratesticular haematoma

Intratesticular haematomas typically result from testicular trauma. Radiographic features isoechoic/hyperechoic region in the traumatised testicle, becoming more hypoechoic as it resolves lack of colour Doppler flow Differential diagnosis segmental testicular infarct testicular neoplasm g...
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Intratesticular varicocele

Intratesticular varicocele is a rare entity, occurring in ~2% of symptomatic population. Pathology It is defined as dilated intratesticular veins seen in relation to the mediastinum testis and extending peripherally. It is usually seen in the presence of ipsilateral extratesticular varicocele....
Article

Intrathoracic kidney

An intrathoracic kidney is a very rare form of ectopic kidney. There has been no reported increased incidence of stones or infections as with other forms of ectopic kidneys. The adrenal glands are usually normal in location. Clinical presentation Intrathoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic ...
Article

Intravenous urography

Intravenous urography (IVU), also referred as intravenous pyelography (IVP) or excretory urography (EU), is a radiographic study of the renal parenchyma, pelvicalyceal system, ureters and the urinary bladder. This exam has been largely replaced by CT urography.  Terminology Some prefer the ter...
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Iron deficiency anaemia

Iron deficiency anaemia is a common cause of anaemia and a common precipitant to radiological investigation. Epidemiology Amongst men and postmenopausal women, the incidence in the developed world is around 2%. Among premenopausal women, the incidence is greater and in most cases, investigatio...
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Ischiocavernosus muscle

The ischiocavernosus muscles are one of the three main muscles found in the superficial perineal pouch along with the bulbospongiosus and superficial transverse perineal muscle.  Summary origin: ischial tuberosity and ramus insertion: males: corpus cavernosum females: clitoris blood supply...
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Jackstone calculus

Jackstone calculus is the name assigned to the appearance of a subset of urinary calculi. Pathology Jackstone calculi are almost always composed of calcium oxalate dihydrate. They are nearly always created, and thus, located, in the bladder rather than the upper urinary tract. They are compos...
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Junctional parenchymal defect of kidney

Junctional parenchymal defects in renal imaging are a normal variant. Pathology It results from the incomplete embryonic fusion of renunculi. Radiographic features Ultrasound It can be seen as a triangular echogenic cortical defect, frequently seen in upper lobe parenchyma. The defect is th...
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Juxtaglomerular cell tumour

Juxtaglomerular cell tumour (JGCT) is an infrequent renal tumour of the juxtaglomerular cells. These cells secrete renin and often cause severe hypertension and hypokalaemia. Epidemiology Juxtaglomerular cell tumour affects all age groups, but is most common in adolescents and young adults, wi...
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Kerr kink

Kerr kink a sign of renal tuberculosis. Scarring leads to a sharp kink at the pelvi-ureteric junction. History and etymology William "Bill" K Kerr, a Canadian urologist, described his eponymous sign in 1967 3.
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Ketamine bladder

Ketamine bladder or ketamine bladder syndrome refers to lower urinary tract symptoms associated with long-term ketamine use. Epidemiology The presence of lower urinary tract symptoms in long-term ketamine users has been identified to be as high as 90% in some studies 1. Clinical presentation ...
Article

Keyhole sign (posterior urethral valves)

The keyhole sign is an ultrasonographic sign seen in boys with posterior urethral valves. It refers to the appearance of the proximal urethra (which is dilated) and an associated thick-walled distended bladder which on ultrasound may resemble a keyhole.
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Kidneys

The kidneys are paired retroperitoneal organs that lie at the level of the T12 to L3 vertebral bodies. Gross anatomy Location The kidneys are located on the posterior abdominal wall, with one on either side of the vertebral column, in the perirenal space. The long axis of the kidney is parall...
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Kidney sweat sign

The kidney sweat sign refers to the presence of thin, hypoechoic, extracapsular fluid collections around kidneys in renal failure patients. This fluid is thought to represent perirenal oedema. It can be appreciated on ultrasound, CT and MRI.  Differential diagnosis perirenal haematoma periren...
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Labia majora

The labia majora (singular: labium majus) form the anteroinferior most part of the vulva, they are continuous with the mons pubis anteriorly and the perineum posteriorly. The labia are apposed in the midline forming the, externally-visible, pudendal cleft. Gross anatomy The labia majora have a...
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Labia minora

The labia minora (singular: labium minus) are small glabrous cutaneous folds lying between and just superior to the labia majora. At their posterior margin the labia may be conjoined by a thin cutaneous fold of skin, the frenulum of the labia (also known as the fourchette).  At their anterior m...
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Lacuna magna

Lacuna magna, also known as the sinus of Guérin, is a congenital blind-ended pouch located dorsal to navicular fossa of penis separated by fold and both share an external common opening to external urethral meatus. This diverticulum is located above and parallel to the urethra.  Epidemiology A...
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Lateral fossa

The lateral fossae are concave depressions of peritoneum in the paravesical space that lie between the lateral umbilical folds and the lateral parietal peritoneum. The lateral fossae are the smallest of the anterior paravesical fossae, and typically partially contain the cecum and/or sigmoid col...
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Lateral umbilical folds

The lateral umbilical folds are raised ridges of parietal peritoneum in the deep aspect of the anterior abdominal wall overlying the inferior epigastric vessels. The paired folds originate medial to the deep inguinal ring and end at the arcuate line on the posterior aspect of the anterior abdomi...
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Lateroconal fascia

The lateroconal fascia is the peritoneal thickening at the adjoining lateral borders of the anterior and posterior perirenal fasciae laterally. Congdon and Edson 1 first named it due to its location lateral to the perirenal space, and therefore the perirenal fascia, which is also known as the co...
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Layers of the scrotum (mnemonic)

A handy mnemonic to recall the layers of the scrotum is: Some Damn Englishman Called It The Testes Mnemonic S: skin D: dartos fascia and muscle E: external spermatic fascia C: cremasteric fascia I: internal spermatic fascia T: tunica vaginalis T: tunica albuginea
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Leiomyoma of the urinary bladder

Leiomyoma of the urinary bladder is a rare benign tumour predominantly found in women, although men can also be affected. The most common presenting complaints are urinary voiding symptoms such as obstruction and irritation.  It exhibits characteristics similar to those of uterine leiomyomas on...
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Lentiform fork sign (basal ganglia)

The lentiform fork sign has been described on MRI and is seen as bilateral symmetrical hyperintensities in the basal ganglia surrounded by a hyperintense rim delineating the lentiform nucleus. It has been postulated to result from metabolic acidosis due to any cause 1, e.g. end stage renal dise...
Article

Leptospirosis

Leptospirosis results from infection of the zoonoses Leptospira sp. The condition can have multi-organ manifestations. Commonly affected organs include: lung: pulmonary leptospirosis liver: hepatic leptospirosis central nervous system: CNS leptospirosis skeletal muscle: muscular leptospirosi...
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Leukoplakia of the urinary tract

Leukoplakia of the urinary tract is a squamous metaplasia of the urothelium (keratinisation).  Clinical presentation Clinically the condition presents with haematuria in one-third of cases, dysuria, frequency and nocturia, and thus it can mimic cystitis. Passage of the desquamated keratinised ...
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Levator ani

The levator ani, also known as the muscular pelvic diaphragm, is the musculotendinous sheet that forms the majority of the pelvic floor, supports the pelvic viscera, and aids in urinary and faecal evacuation as well as maintaining continence. Gross anatomy The levator ani has three main compon...
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Leydig cell tumour of the testis

A Leydig cell tumour of the testis is an uncommon testicular neoplasm. Its imaging appearance on ultrasound and MRI is nonspecific, but clinically it is associated with serum hormonal imbalance. Epidemiology 1-3% of all testicular tumours, but the most common sex-cord stromal tumour. Tend to b...
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Liddle syndrome

Liddle's syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition which inhibits the normal degradation of the ENaC sodium channel, resulting in findings that mimic Conn's syndrome (hyperaldosteronism); hypernatraemia, hypokalaemia and elevated serum bicarbonate. Typically patients are asymptomatic other tha...
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Lipomatosis

Lipomatosis is a condition where there is diffuse excessive fat deposition within the body. This can especially affect certain regions. neck and upper region of trunk Madelung disease mediastinal lipomatosis heart lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum lipomatous metaplasia of th...
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Lithium-induced renal disease

Lithium-induced renal disease is characterised by a progressive decline in renal function, evidenced by increasing serum creatinine and decreased creatinine clearance. The lithium salt causes direct injury to the renal tubules. The duration of lithium therapy increases the risk of progression to...
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Lobar nephronia

Lobar nephronia refers to an intermediate stage between acute pyelonephritis and renal abscess, and is a focal region of interstitial nephritis.  It appears as a wedge of poorly perfused renal parenchyma, without a cortical rim sign. The condition is discussed further as part of the article on...
Article

Lobster claw sign (kidney)

Lobster claw sign refers to a urographic pattern of papillary excavation that may be seen with renal papillary necrosis. The lobster claw sign occurs when there is excavation around the edge of the papilla and the contrast material that extends into this excavated region looks like the "claws" ...
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Localised cystic renal disease

Localised cystic renal disease (LCRD) (or localised cystic kidney disease) is an uncommon, non-familial, non-progressive disease characterised by clusters of cysts within normal renal parenchyma. It can be confused with unilateral autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), multilocula...
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Loin pain haematuria syndrome

Loin pain haematuria syndrome is a rare disorder in which patients suffer episodes of severe unilateral or bilateral flank pain with microscopic or gross haematuria in the absence of renal pathology. Epidemiology Approximately 70% of patients are young females with a peak incidence in the thir...
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Loopogram

A loopogram is a fluoroscopic study of an ileal conduit, which is a type of urinary diversion. Terminology This procedure is also known is an ileal conduitogram, ileal loopography or ileostoureterography.  Procedure It is a retrograde study in which contrast is injected via the anterior abdo...
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Loop-to-loop colon

The loop-to-loop colon describes an abnormal colonic course associated with the absence of the left kidney from the renal fossa.  The transverse colon extends to the lateral margin of the abdominal wall and the descending colon courses medially to fill the renal fossa, resulting in a "looped" c...
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Lower urinary tract symptoms

Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are a constellation of symptoms including 1: poor stream despite straining hesitancy, frequency and incomplete emptying of the bladder nocturia Although they are most frequently encountered in men with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) they are also found...
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Low signal intensity renal parenchyma

There are relatively few of causes of low signal intensity renal parenchyma. Causes include: haemolysis paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinurea. mechanical: malfunctioning prosthetic cardiac valve sickle cell disease infection hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) vascular disease ac...
Article

Lumbar hernia

Lumbar hernias are a rare form of posterior abdominal hernia.  Epidemiology Most common in patients aged between 50 and 70 years with a male predominance 1.  Clinical presentation Patients with lumbar hernias can present with a variety of symptoms, including a posterolateral mass, back pain,...
Article

Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare multi-system disorder that can occur either sporadically or in association with the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and is often considered a forme fruste of TSC.​ Epidemiology It almost exclusively affects women of childbearing age 7. The estimated in...
Article

Macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

Macronodular adrenal hyperplasia refers to a morphological type of adrenal hyperplasia in which there is adrenal enlargement in the form of large distinct nodules. It can be congenital or acquired. A specific subtype under this entity is adrenocorticotropin independent macronodular adrenocortic...
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Maiden waist deformity

Maiden waist deformity is the appearance of the deviation of bilateral ureters. This typically occurs in retroperitoneal fibrosis. In this condition, there is medial indrawing of the ureters due to deposition of fibrous tissue in the lumbosacral junction. Due to involvement of both ureters, the ...
Article

Malacoplakia of the urinary tract

Malacoplakia of the urinary tract is an uncommon chronic granulomatous inflammatory disease of the bladder wall. Malakoplakia (meaning "soft plaque") can affect any organ, but the urinary bladder is the commonest location. Epidemiology Malacoplakia has a peak incidence in middle age and has a ...
Article

Male pseudohermaphroditism

Male pseudohermaphroditism (MPH) is a variation of gender development.  Pathology Patients with male pseudohermaphroditism have 46 XY karyotype and may manifest as a female phenotype with various degrees of undervirilization secondary to partial androgen insensitivity.  Causes androgen insen...
Article

Male reproductive system

The male reproductive system (or tract) includes: penis testes epididymides ductus deferentia ejaculatory ducts seminal vesicles prostate bulbourethral glands It can be imaged using almost the entire range of imaging modalities but ultrasound and MRI are most often used (in part because...
Article

Male urethra

The male urethra is a fibromuscular tube that drains urine from the bladder. It has a longer, more complicated, course than the female urethra and is also more prone to pathology. Gross anatomy The male urethra measures, on average, 18-20 cm in length. It commences at the internal urethral ori...
Article

Male urethral segments (mnemonic)

A helpful mnemonic to remember the 4 segments of the male urethra from proximal to distal. Pet My Beautiful Pig P: prostatic M: membranous B: bulbous P: penile Posterior urethra equates to the prostatic and membranous urethras.  Anterior urethra equates to the bulbous and penile urethras. ...
Article

Management of incidental adrenal masses: American College of Radiology white paper

The management of incidental adrenal masses revised in 2017 by the Adrenal Subcommittee of the Incidental Findings Committee of the American College of Radiology is an algorithm for the management of patients who are: adults (i.e. 18-year-old or over) asymptomatic for adrenal pathology referr...
Article

Manta ray sign (bladder)

The manta ray sign is a radiographic appearance in bladder exstrophy. It describes wide midline separation of the pubic bones simulating the appearance of a manta ray swimming towards you 1. Differential diagnosis On a plain radiograph consider: open book pelvic injuries: the smooth arc of th...
Article

Mature metastasising teratoma

A mature metastasising teratoma is an uncommon complication of mature testicular teratomas, whereby distant metastatic deposits of histologically mature cells are encountered.  
Article

McCune-Albright syndrome

McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a genetic disorder characterised by the association of: endocrinopathy: precocious puberty polyostotic fibrous dysplasia: more severe than in sporadic cases cutaneous pigmentation: coast of Maine 'cafe au lait' spots Clinical presentation Presentation is va...
Article

Medial fossa

The medial fossae are concave depressions of peritoneum in the paravesical space bounded by the medial umbilical folds and the lateral umbilical folds. The fossae are contained within the inguinal (Hesselbach’s) triangle. The right medial fossa typically partially contains the cecum and/or ileum...
Article

Medial umbilical folds

The medial umbilical folds are raised ridges of parietal peritoneum in the deep aspect of the anterior abdominal wall formed by the underlying medial umbilical ligaments. The paired folds run from pelvis to umbilicus. The medial umbilical ligaments are anatomical remnants of foetal umbilical art...
Article

Median umbilical fold

The median umbilical fold is a raised ridge of parietal peritoneum in the deep aspect of the anterior abdominal wall overlying the median umbilical ligament. It runs from the apex of the bladder to the umbilicus. The median umbilical ligament is the anatomical remnant of the foetal urachus. The ...
Article

Medical devices in the abdomen and pelvis

Medical devices in the abdomen and pelvis are important to be recognised, just like medical devices of the chest. Often we ignore these devices, considering them to be incidental and non-pathological, however it is essential to be aware of potential complications. Gastrointestinal tubes stomac...
Article

Medullary cystic disease complex

Medullary cystic disease complex belongs to group of paediatric cystic renal diseases charaterised by progressive tubular atrophy with glomerulosclerosis (chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis) and multiple small medullary cysts.  Epidemiology There is no recognised gender predilection Clinica...
Article

Medullary nephrocalcinosis

Renal medullary nephrocalcinosis is the commonest form of nephrocalcinosis and refers to the deposition of calcium salts in the medulla of the kidney. Due to the concentrating effects of the loops of Henle, and the biochemical milieu of the medulla, compared to the cortex, it is 20 times more co...
Article

Medullary nephrocalcinosis (mnemonic)

A common mnemonic used to remember the aetiology of medullary nephrocalcinosis is: HAM HOP Mnemonic H: hyperparathyroidism A: (renal tubular) acidosis M: medullary sponge kidney H: hypercalcemia / hypercalciuria O: oxalosis P: papillary necrosis See also renal papillary necrosis mnemon...
Article

Medullary sponge kidney

Medullary sponge kidney is a sporadic condition where the medullary and papillary portions of the collecting ducts are dysplastic and dilated and in most cases develop medullary nephrocalcinosis.  Epidemiology The incidence of medullary sponge kidney is estimated at ≈1:5000. Clinical presenta...
Article

Megacystis megaureter syndrome

Megacystis megaureter syndrome describes the radiologic appearance of a large capacity thin-walled bladder and massive primary vesicoureteral reflux. Pathology The pathophysiology of these massively dilated ureters and the large capacity bladder is the constant recycling of large volumes of r...
Article

Megapolycalycosis

Megapolycalycosis is a rare congenital anomaly of the kidney which is characterised by dilatation and increase in number of the renal calyces without any distal obstruction. Epidemiology Associations  obstructive uropathy vesicoureteric reflux Schinzel- Giedion syndrome Clinical presentati...

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