Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

3,048 results found
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Congenital anomalies of the posterior atlas arch

Congenital anomalies of the posterior arch of the atlas (C1) are relatively common anomalies. They may range from partial defects presenting as clefts to complete absence of the posterior arch (aplasia). These anomalies are classified according to Currarino (see below). It should not be confuse...
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Congenital coronary artery anomalies

Congenital coronary artery anomalies (CCAAs) are not common, found only in ~1% (range 0.1-2%) of patients 1,3.The most important finding to look for is the "malignant" course of anomalous coronary artery, i.e. does the artery run between big pulsating objects - right ventricular outflow tract / ...
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Congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt classification

This congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt classification was proposed by Park et al. in 1990 1: type 1: single large vessel of constant diameter connecting the right portal vein to the inferior vena cava type 2: localized, peripheral shunt with one or more communications in a single hep...
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Congenital portosystemic shunt

​Congenital portosystemic shunts are rare, extrahepatic or intrahepatic, anatomical abnormalities shunting blood from the portal venous system to the systemic venous system and, thus, avoiding passage through the hepatic acinus. Terminology The term “portosystemic shunt” can be used to refer t...
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Congenital pulmonary venolobar syndrome

Congenital pulmonary venolobar syndrome is a condition comprising a rare group of cardiac and pulmonary congenital abnormalities occurring variably in combination. The abnormalities include: anomalous pulmonary venous drainage particularly scimitar syndrome with hypogenetic right lung pulmona...
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Congenital urachal anomalies

Congenital urachal anomalies are a spectrum of potential anomalies that can occur due to incomplete involution of the urachus. Epidemiology A urachal remnant occurs in approximately 1 in 5000 patients. Pathology The urachus connects the dome of the bladder to the umbilical cord during fetal ...
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Congenital utero-vaginal anomalies

There are many classification systems for congenital utero-vaginal anomalies. These include: Buttram and Gibbons classification 2 American Fertility Society (AFS) classification Modified Rock and Adam - AFS classification Modified Rock and Adam - AFS classification This classification divid...
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Conjoined nerve root

A conjoined root is a type of developmental anomaly involving a nerve root. It is the most common nerve root developmental anomaly of the cauda equina being twice as common as two roots in the same foramen, the next most common anomaly. Epidemiology The incidence in cadaveric studies is ~10 (r...
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Conjoint tendon

The conjoint tendon, also known as Henle's ligament, forms when the medial fibers of the internal oblique aponeurosis unite with the deeper fibers of the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The conjoint tendon then turns inferiorly and attaches onto the pubic crest and pecten pubis 1.  Relations...
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Conjunctiva

The conjunctiva (plural: conjunctivas or conjunctivae) is a transparent membrane is attached at the margins of the cornea. It is loosely attached to the sclera and thence reflected over the inner surface of the eyelids. It is firmly attached to the tarsal plates and blends with the skin at the m...
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Conoid ligament

The conoid ligament is one of two components forming the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament. The trapezoid ligament is the other component. Gross anatomy The conoid ligament takes the shape of an inverted cone. It is the posteromedial part of the coracoclavicular ligament. Its apex originates from...
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Conoid tubercle

The conoid tubercle also known as the coracoid tuberosity (not to be confused with the coracoid process of the scapula) is a bony prominence on the inferior surface of the lateral third of the clavicle.  It marks the insertion of the conoid ligament (which along with the trapezoid ligament) for...
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Contents of the cubital fossa (mnemonic)

A useful mnemonic to remember the contents of the cubital fossa is, from medial to lateral: My Brother Throws Rad Parties Mnemonic M: median nerve B: brachial artery T: tendon of biceps R: radial nerve P: posterior interosseous branch of radial nerve
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Conus artery

The conus artery is a small early branch off the right coronary artery (RCA) circulation. Gross anatomy Supply The artery has a variable distribution, but usually supplies a region of the anterior interventricular septum and the conus of the main pulmonary artery (hence its name). Variant an...
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Conus medullaris

The conus medullaris is the terminal end of the spinal cord. Gross anatomy After the cord terminates, the nerve roots descend within the spinal canal as individual rootlets, collectively termed the cauda equina. The conus medullaris most commonly terminates at the L1/2 intervertebral disc leve...
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Cooper ligament

Cooper ligaments are the fibrous connections between the inner side of the breast skin and the pectoral muscles. Working in conjunction with the fatty tissues and the more fibrous lobular tissues, they are largely responsible for maintaining the shape and configuration of the breast. They play a...
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Coracoacromial arch

Coracoacromial arch is a term for different bony and ligamentous structures, which form the superior border supraspinatus outlet. Gross anatomy It comprises the following anatomical structures from anterior to posterior 1: coracoid process coracoacromial ligament acromioclavicular joint ac...
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Coracoacromial ligament

The coracoacromial ligament is a flat triangular band that plays a supportive role for the shoulder joint. Gross anatomy originates from the medial border of the acromion attaches to the lateral border of the coracoid process overlies the subacromial bursa indirectly supports the head of th...
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Coracobrachialis muscle

The coracobrachialis muscle is one of the three muscles of the anterior compartment of the arm. It sits beneath the biceps brachii, inserting via a flat tendon into the medial shaft of the humerus. origin: coracoid process of scapula insertion: via a flat tendon onto the midportion of the medi...
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Coracoclavicular bursa

The coracoclavicular bursa, also known as the supracoracoid bursa, can be found within the angle separating the trapezoid and conoid segments of the coracoclavicular ligament 1,3. It is surrounded by varying amounts of fibro-fatty tissue. Smaller bursae associated with the coracoid process or ei...
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Coracoclavicular joint

The coracoclavicular joint is a normal variant of the pectoral girdle, where the conoid tubercle of the clavicle appears enlarged or elongated, with a flattened inferior surface where it approximates the coracoid process of the scapula to form an articulation.  Epidemiology More common in Asia...
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Coracoclavicular ligament

The coracoclavicular (CC) ligament is the major vertical stabilizing factor of the acromioclavicular joint. Gross anatomy The coracoclavicular ligament can be divided into two parts, the more medial conoid ligament and trapezoid ligament.  conoid ligament origin: knuckle of the coracoid proc...
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Coracohumeral ligament

The coracohumeral ligament (CHL) is a strong supportive ligament of the shoulder joint and is a part of the rotator cuff interval. Gross anatomy originates from the lateral surface of the base of the coracoid process runs laterally across the glenohumeral capsule and covers the long head of t...
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Coracoid process

The coracoid process is an anteriorly projecting hook-like process on the superolateral edge of the scapula that projects anterolaterally. Gross anatomy Attachments muscles: coracobrachialis from the medial apex short head of biceps brachii from the lateral apex pectoralis minor from the m...
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Cornea

The cornea forms the fibrous layer of the anterior portion of the eye. It functions to refract light entering the eye.  Summary location: anterior one-sixth of the eyeball blood supply: avascular innervation: long ciliary nerves  relations: continuous with the sclera posteriorly and covered...
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Corniculate cartilage

The corniculate cartilages are paired, elastic and accessory cartilages of the larynx that lie superior to and articulate with the apices of the arytenoid cartilages. They are components of the laryngeal cartilages. History and etymology The word 'corniculate' comes from the Latin word 'cornu'...
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Coronal suture

The coronal suture is the cranial suture formed between the two parietal bones and the frontal bone. At the junction of coronal, sagittal and frontal sutures is the anterior fontanelle which is open at birth and usually fuses at around 18-24 months after birth. Fusion of the coronal suture occu...
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Corona mortis

Corona mortis, Latin for "crown of death", is a common variant vascular anastomosis between the external iliac artery or deep inferior epigastric artery with the obturator artery. It is reported to be present in a third of patients on routine multi-detector CT examination 1,4.  Knowledge of thi...
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Corona radiata

The corona radiata refer to a pair of white matter tracts seen at the level of the lateral ventricles. Superiorly they are continuous with the centrum semiovale. Inferiorly these tracts converge as the internal capsule.
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Coronary arterial dominance

Coronary arterial dominance is defined by the vessel which gives rise to the posterior descending artery (PDA), which supplies the myocardium of the inferior third of the interventricular septum. Most hearts (80-85%) are right dominant where the PDA is supplied by the right coronary artery (RCA...
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Coronary arteries

The coronary arteries arise from the coronary sinuses immediately distal (superior) to the aortic valve and supply the myocardium of the heart with oxygenated blood. The arteries branch to encircle the heart covering its surface with a lacy network, perhaps resembling a slightly crooked crown. ...
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Coronary ligament (liver)

The coronary ligament is a peritoneal ligament complex of the liver which encloses the bare area of the liver. Gross anatomy The coronary ligament is formed by the reflection of the peritoneum from the undersurface of the diaphragm onto the superior and posterior surfaces to the right lobe of ...
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Coronary sinus

The coronary sinus is the largest cardiac venous structure. It returns the majority of the blood supply for the left ventricle to the right atrium. Gross anatomy The coronary sinus courses along the posterior wall of the left atrium into the left atrioventricular groove. It normally drains int...
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Coronary veins

The coronary veins return deoxygenated blood from the myocardium back to the right atrium. Most venous blood returns via the coronary sinus. Coronary venous anatomy is highly variable, but is generally comprised of three groups: cardiac veins which drain into the coronary sinus: great cardiac ...
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Coronoid process (disambiguation)

Coronoid process can refer to a number of different anatomical structures: coronoid process (mandible) coronoid process (ulna)
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Corpora quadrigemina

The corpora quadrigemina (Latin for "quadruplet bodies", singular: corpus quadrigeminum) are the four colliculi, two inferior and two superior, that sit on the quadrigeminal plate on the posterior surface of the midbrain. The corpora quadrigemina are reflex centers involving vision and hearing:...
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Corpus albicans

The corpus albicans is a fibrous scar that results from the involution of the corpus luteum if fertilisation does not occur. When seen on ultrasound, it is a small, lobulated echogenic intra-ovarian lesion.  History and etymology It is Latin for "whitening body", after the white appearance of ...
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Corpus callosum

The corpus callosum (plural: corpora callosa) is the largest of the commissural fibers, linking the cerebral cortex of the left and right cerebral hemispheres. It is the largest white matter tract in the brain. Summary located inferior to the cerebral cortices, and superior to the thalamus co...
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Corpus luteum

The corpus luteum (plural: corpora lutea) is a temporary endocrine structure involved in ovulation and early pregnancy. During ovulation, the primary follicle forms the secondary follicle and subsequently the mature vesicular follicle. At ovulation the follicle ruptures expelling the ovum into...
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Corpus striatum

The corpus striatum is a collective name given to the caudate nucleus and lentiform nucleus within the basal ganglia. History and etymology The term originates from the Latin "striatus", meaning "striped", referring to the caudatolenticar bridges of grey matter crossing the internal capsule fr...
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Corrugator supercilii muscle

The corrugator supercilii muscles are two small, triangular muscles of facial expression, which contribute to movement of the eyebrows, including frowning. They are located deep to the frontal part of occipitofrontalis and orbicularis oculi muscles, with which they blend 2. Summary origin: med...
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Cortex (disambiguation)

The term cortex (plural: cortices) is used for multiple structures in human anatomy, and in general refers to an outer layer, which in many organs (brain aside) lies external to a medulla. cortex (brain) cerebral cortex cerebellar cortex cortex (adrenal) cortex (bone) cortex (crystalline l...
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Cortical bone

The outer shell of compact bone is called cortical bone or cortex. It is formed by compact bone which is one of the two macroscopic forms of bone, the other being cancellous bone.  Gross anatomy Cortical bone contains Haversian systems (osteons) which contain a central Haversian canal surround...
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Corticobulbar tract

The corticobulbar (or corticonuclear) tract originates primarily in Brodmann area 4 and exits at the brainstem to synapse on the lower motor neurons of the cranial nerves bilaterally. The exception to this is the facial nerve and hypoglossal nerve. Innervation to the lower half of the face (via...
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Corticorubral tract

The corticorubral tract contains neurons that connect the primary motor and sensory areas to the red nucleus. The rubrospinal tract then descends through the spinal cord.  The tract is thought to excite flexor muscles and inhibit extensor muscles. Gross anatomy Central connections The corti...
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Corticospinal tract

The corticospinal tract (or pyramidal tract) is a descending white matter tract primarily concerned with motor function extending from the motor cortex down to synapse with motor neurons of the spinal cord in the anterior horns.  Gross anatomy Central connections Corticospinal fibers are axon...
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Costal cartilage

The costal cartilages form part of the thoracic cage and anterior chest wall. There are ten costal cartilages bilaterally, one for each of the corresponding 1st to 10th ribs, and each of the first seven ribs forms one of the seven costochondral joints. Costal cartilages 1-7 articulate with the ...
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Costocervical trunk

The costocervical trunk is one of the branches of the second part of the subclavian artery. It arises from the posterior wall of the subclavian artery, posterior or medial to the anterior scalene muscle and courses posterosuperiorly across the suprapleural membrane where it divides into 2 branc...
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Costochondral joint

The costochondral joints are the joints between each rib and its costal cartilage.  They are primary cartilaginous joints.  These joints represent the demarcation of the unossified and ossified part of the rib 1.  The joint is held together by periosteum, with the lateral aspect of the costal ca...
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Costoclavicular ligament

The costoclavicular ligament or rhomboid ligament (a.k.a. Halsted's ligament 2) is the major stabilizing factor of the sternoclavicular joint and is the axis of movement of the joint. Gross anatomy The costoclavicular ligament binds the inferior medial clavicle (via the rhomboid fossa) to the ...
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Costoclavicular space

The costoclavicular space is the anterior portion of the superior thoracic aperture, between the clavicle and first rib. The subclavian vessels and brachial plexus pass though the space related to the scalene muscles. Proximally, the plexus passes through the interscalene space, and distally thr...
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Costovertebral joint

The costovertebral joint is the articulations between the ribs and the vertebral column. Gross Anatomy The ribs articulate with the thoracic vertebrae via two distinctly different joints: costovertebral joint - articulation between the head of the rib and the vertebral body costotransverse j...
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Costoxiphoid ligament

The costoxiphoid ligaments, also known as the chondroxiphoid ligaments, are inconstant fibrous structures joining the anterior and posterior surfaces of the xiphoid to the respective surfaces of the adjacent seventh and, occasionally, sixth costal cartilages.
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Couinaud classification of hepatic segments

The Couinaud classification (pronounced kwee-NO) is currently the most widely used system to describe functional liver anatomy. It is the preferred anatomy classification system as it divides the liver into eight independent functional units (termed segments) rather than relying on the tradition...
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Couinaud classification of hepatic segments (mnemonic)

Pauli et al published a "handy" way to remember the Couinaud classification of hepatic segments 1. Make a fist with your right hand. The fingers should be wrapped around the flexed thumb and the fist should face you. The segments are represented by the following: segment 1: (caudate): the thum...
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Coumadin ridge

A coumadin ridge, also called warfarin ridge or left lateral ridge, is a band-like embryological remnant in the left atrium between the left superior pulmonary vein and the left atrial appendage. It is considered an anatomical variant.  The ridge is formed by the coalition of the left superior ...
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Cranial foramina

The cranial foramina are the holes that exist in the skull to allow the passage of structures into and out of the cranium. Some clefts/fissures, which are not entirely surrounded by bone, and canals, which are longer than their diameter, are often included in this category. Most cranial foramin...
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Cranial meninges

The cranial meninges (singular: meninx) surround the brain and are made up of three layers (from outermost to innermost): dura mater arachnoid mater pia mater The dura mater can also be known as the pachymeninx. The arachnoid mater and pia mater are collectively known as the leptomeninges 3....
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Cranial nerve nuclei

The cranial nerve nuclei are a series of bilateral grey matter motor and sensory nuclei located in the midbrain, pons and medulla that are the collections of afferent and efferent cell bodies for many of the cranial nerves. Some nuclei are small and contribute to a single cranial nerve, such as...
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Cranial nerves

The cranial nerves are the 12 paired sets of nerves that arise from the cerebrum or brainstem and leave the central nervous system through cranial foramina rather than through the spine. The cranial nerves are numbered one to twelve, always using the Roman numerals, I to XII. Most have cranial n...
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Cranial nerves (mnemonic)

There are many cranial nerve mnemonics that can be memorable and rude/lewd. Either way, they can be helpful for remembering the names of the twelve cranial nerves, as well as remembering which nerves are sensory, motor, or both. Remembering cranial nerve names in order of CN I to CN XII: On ol...
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Cranial vault

The cranial vault, also known as the skull vault, skullcap or calvaria, is the cranial space that encases and protects the brain together with the base of the skull (chondrocranium). The cranial vault and the base of skull together form the neurocranium. Gross anatomy The cranial vault consist...
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Cremasteric artery

The cremasteric artery is a small branch of the inferior epigastric artery that enters the deep inguinal ring of the inguinal canal and supplies the layers of the spermatic cord and also the skin of the scrotum, including the cremaster muscle. History and etymology The word "cremaster" derives...
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Cremaster muscle

The cremaster muscle is the thin fascial muscle of the spermatic cord made of skeletal muscle. It is also referred to as cremaster fascia or simply the cremaster. Its action is to retract the testes, important in thermoregulation and spermatogenesis.  Gross anatomy It is derived from the inter...
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Crests of Duret

The crests of Duret attach the most numerous superficial breast lobes by their summit to the superficial layer of fascia. The deepest crests connect the anterior lobes to the deep layer through the Cooper's ligament. Breast lobe groups about one hundred lobules separated by interlobular connect...
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Cribriform plate

The cribriform plate (less commonly also called the lamina cribrosa of the ethmoid bone) is a sieve-like structure between the anterior cranial fossa and the nasal cavity. It is a part of ethmoid bone and supports the olfactory bulb, which lies in the olfactory fossa. It is perforated by foramin...
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Cricoid cartilage

The cricoid cartilage is a ring-shaped structure that sits just below the thyroid cartilage, at the level of the C6 vertebra. It is the only complete cartilaginous ring of the whole airway. Gross anatomy The anterior portion is called the arch and the posterior quadrangular shaped portion is t...
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Crista galli

The crista galli is a thick, midline, smooth triangular process arising from the superior surface of the ethmoid bone, projecting into the anterior cranial fossa. It separates the olfactory bulbs, which lie either side of it in the olfactory fossae of the cribriform plate. It serves as an anteri...
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Crista terminalis

The crista terminalis is a smooth muscular ridge in the superior aspect of the right atrium, formed following resorption of the right valve of the sinus venosus. It represents the junction between the sinus venarum, the "smooth" portion of the right atrium derived from the embryologic sinus veno...
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Critical zone in rotator cuff tendons

The critical zone of the rotator cuff is an area approximately 8-15 mm from the insertion of the rotator cuff tendons onto the greater tubercle of the humeral head, mainly within the supraspinatus tendon. This is a watershed zone between the anterior and posterior circumflex humeral, thoracoacro...
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Crossed fused renal ectopia

Crossed fused renal ectopia refers to an anomaly where the kidneys are fused and located on the same side of the midline. Epidemiology The estimated incidence is around 1 out of 1000 births 1. There is a recognized male predilection with a 2:1 male to female ratio. More than 90% of crossed ren...
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Crossed renal ectopia

Crossed renal ectopia is said to be present when the kidney is seen in the opposite retroperitoneal space. It is more common for the left kidney to be ectopically located on the right side. More than 85% of these get fused resulting in crossed fused renal ectopia. Less than 15% cases are non-fus...
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Cruciate ligament of the atlas

The cruciate ligament of the atlas (also known as the cruciform ligament) is an important ligamentous complex that holds the posterior dens of C2 in articulation at the median atlantoaxial joint. It lies behind a large synovial bursa (surrounded by loose fibrous capsule) and consists of two band...
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Crural arteries

Crural arteries are the arteries of the leg, distal to the popliteal artery. Usage Typically used in the context of peripheral arterial disease, the term is used to describe distal lesions, as distinct from those in the aortoiliac or femoropopliteal segments of the arterial tree. Crural arteri...
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Crus (disambiguation)

A crus (plural: crura) is an anatomical term used for a structure which resembles a leg. crus (auricle) crus (cerebrum) crus (clitoris) crus (diaphragm) crus (fornix) crus (heart) crus (incus) crus (internal capsule) crus (nose) crus (penis) crus (semicircular duct) crus (stapes) cr...
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Crystalline lens

The crystalline lens (or simply, the lens, plural: lenses) is in the ocular globe between the posterior chamber and the vitreous body. It is transparent and biconvex in morphology, and aids the focusing of light onto the retina.  Gross anatomy Location The lens lies in the globe at the poster...
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CT angiography of the splanchnic vessels

Multi-slice CT angiography of the splanchnic vessels is a powerful minimally invasive technique for evaluation of the splanchnic vascular system. Technique   The actual procedure will vary depending on institutional protocol/guidelines but below is a typical description 2, 4: patient receives...
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CT cerebral venography (technique)

CT cerebral venography (also known as a CTV head) is a contrast enhanced examination with an acquisition delay providing an accurate detailed depiction of the cerebral venous system.  NB: This article is intended to outline some general principles of protocol design. The specifics will vary dep...
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Cubital fossa

The cubital fossa (a.k.a. antecubital fossa) (plural: fossae) is an inverted triangular space that forms the transition between the arm and the forearm. It is located anterior to the elbow joint. The terms cubital/antecubital fossa are also used in surface anatomy for the skin overlying this re...
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Cubital tunnel

The cubital tunnel is a space through which the ulnar nerve passes posterior to the medial epicondyle of the humerus.  Gross anatomy Boundaries roof cubital tunnel retinaculum (also known as ligament or band of Osborne), extends from the olecranon to the medial epicondyle anconeus epitrochl...
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Cuboid

The cuboid bone is one of the tarsal bones located lateral to the lateral cuneiform bone and has an important articulation with the calcaneus. Summary location: lies laterally in the midfoot articulations: proximally with the calcaneus, medially with the lateral cuneiform and navicular, and d...
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Cuneate fasciculus

The cuneate fasciculus, also known as the fasciculus cuneatus (plural: fasciculi cuneati) or column of Burdach, represents the lateral portion of the dorsal columns and carries input from between and including C1 and T6 1.  Function The cuneate fasciculus is responsible for transmitting vibrat...
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Cuneiform bones

There are three cuneiform bones in the tarsus of a normal human foot, they are from medial to lateral: medial cuneiform intermediate cuneiform lateral cuneiform History and etymology Cuneiform means wedge-shaped from the Latin words 'cuneus' meaning wedge and 'form' referring to shape.
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Cuneiform cartilage

The cuneiform cartilage is a small, paired cartilage which resides in the aryepiglottic fold. It takes the form of a club-like nodule, visible as an elevation beneath the mucosa (the cuneiform tubercle) anterosuperior to the corniculate cartilages. History and etymology The word cuneiform deri...
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Cuneus

The cuneus (plural: cunei) is a wedge-shaped region on the medial surface of the occipital lobe. Gross anatomy Relations Anterosuperiorly the parieto-occipital sulcus separates the cuneus from the precuneus of the parietal lobe. Posteroinferiorly the cuneus abuts the calcarine sulcus which s...
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Cyamella

A cyamella is a rare sesamoid bone that exists as a normal variant within the popliteus tendon, characteristically located at the lateral aspect of the distal femur in the popliteal groove. Cyamella is best seen on the AP view of plain radiograph as opposed to fabella, which is best appreciated...
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Cystic artery

The cystic artery is the main artery supplying the gallbladder. It most commonly arises from the right hepatic artery within Calot triangle 1. Gross anatomy The cystic artery typically passes posterior to the cystic duct to reach the neck of the gallbladder. At this point, it gives off two-to-...
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Cystic duct

The cystic duct connects the neck of the gallbladder to the common hepatic duct (CHD), draining bile to and from the biliary tree. Gross anatomy The confluence of the cystic duct and the common hepatic duct forms the common bile duct (CBD). The cystic duct is approximately 2-3 cm long and 2-3 ...
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Cystic lymph node of Lund

The cystic lymph node of Lund (also known as the Calot or Mascagni node) is the sentinel node for the gallbladder, and one of the structures in Calot triangle. It lies in close proximity to the cystic artery and is one of the structures removed during cholecystectomy. History and etymology The...
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Danger space

The danger space is a deep compartment of the head and neck located behind the true retropharyngeal space, extending from the skull base to the mediastinum. Terminology The danger space has no specific contents apart from a small amount of loose fatty connective tissue and is thus usually indi...
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Dartos muscle

The dartos muscle is the thin rugated fascial muscle of the scrotum made of smooth muscle. Hence it is also referred to as dartos fascia or simply the dartos. It forms from the subcutaneous tissue of the scrotum and base of the penis and attaches to the scrotal skin and fibrous midline septum be...
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Deep auricular artery

The deep auricular artery is the first named branch of the maxillary artery and passes through the bony or cartilaginous wall of the external acoustic meatus to supply the skin of that canal and part of the tympanic membrane. It can sometimes contribute a small branch to the arterial supply of t...
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Deep brachial artery

The deep brachial artery or profunda brachii artery is a large branch of the brachial artery, located in the arm. Summary origin: brachial artery location: posterior aspect of the arm supply: triceps brachii main branches: middle collateral and radial collateral arteries Gross anatomy Ori...

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