Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

3,265 results found
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Interspinales muscles

The interspinales muscles are a group of paired muscle fascicles found in the paraspinal portion of the deepest layer of the intrinsic back muscles. Gross anatomy The interspinales muscles extend between the spinous processes of two neighboring vertebrae. They are present throughout the entir...
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Rectus capitis anterior muscle

The rectus capitis anterior muscle is a short muscle that belongs to the prevertebral and anterior neck muscles. It is located anterior to the vertebral column and stretches between the atlas and the base of the skull. Summary origin: lateral mass and transverse process of atlas (C1) insertio...
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Middle clunal nerve

The middle clunal nerve is a sensory nerve that originates from S1-S4 1. It travels underneath the long posterior sacroiliac ligament (LPSL) and passes between the posterior superior iliac spine and posterior inferior iliac spine to course over the iliac crest 1. It supplies sensation to the lum...
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Os interphalangeus

Os interphalangeus is an ossicle present in the plantar aspect of interphalangeal joint of great toe 1. The ossicle can be present either centrally or eccentrically within the joint capsule and is separated from the flexor hallucis longus tendon by a bursa. Radiographic features Plain radiogra...
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Depressor supercilii muscle

The depressor supercilii is a facial muscle located in the eye region between both eyebrows and orbits. Terminology The nature of this muscle is in some dispute as some anatomical specialists consider it to be part of the orbicularis oculi muscle, while others maintain that it is a distinct mu...
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Extensor indicis proprius

The extensor indicis propius (EIP) muscle is one of the muscles of the posterior deep compartment of the forearm. It is involved in the extension of the second digit at the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints 1. Summary origin: posterior surface of ulna and interosseous membrane in...
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Foramen cecum (tongue)

The foramen cecum of the tongue is the remnant of thyroglossal duct located between the anterior two-thirds and posterior third of the tongue.  Gross anatomy The foramen cecum is located in the midline on the surface of the tongue, at the apex of the terminal sulcus, the groove that marks the ...
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Metopic ridge

A metopic ridge refers to a variation in skull shape, characterized by a midline forehead ridge, which may occur either due to the physiological closure of the metopic suture or as a result of craniosynostosis of this suture 1-3. It is essential to differentiate between the two conditions becaus...
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Adductor hiatus

The adductor hiatus is an opening between the adductor magnus muscle and the femur. It is also known as the hiatus magnus. Gross Anatomy adductor hiatus represents the distal end of the adductor canal it is the anatomical landmark where the femoral artery and vein transition to become the pop...
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Ciliary body (eye)

The ciliary body is the continuation of the uveal layer of the eye and functions in the production of aqueous humor and the process of lens accommodation.  Summary location: between the vitreous body and posterior chamber of the globe function: aqueous humor production and accommodation...
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Posterior meningeal artery

The posterior meningeal artery is the largest artery supplying the dura of the posterior cranial fossa. It may arise from the ascending pharyngeal artery, or less commonly, the occipital artery. The artery may enter the cranial vault through the jugular foramen, foramen magnum or the hypoglossal...
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Thoracic splanchnic nerves

The thoracic splanchnic nerves are three paired autonomic nerves that provide sympathetic innervation of the abdominopelvic viscera and vessels. They contain efferent and afferent fibers. Gross anatomy Three pairs of thoracic splanchnic nerves arise from the T5 to T12 sympathetic ganglia. Gre...
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Somatic nervous system

The somatic nervous system (SNS) is a subdivision of the peripheral nervous system which provides innervation to the somatic structures of the body, that is the parts excluding the viscera, smooth muscle, and glands. The SNS is distributed throughout the body through somatosensory neurons withi...
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Phrenic plexus

The phrenic plexus (plural: plexuses) is an autonomic nerve plexus and ganglia in the upper abdomen. It is a lateral epiarterial extension of the celiac plexus. Summary location: the bilateral ganglia and plexuses lie along the inferior phrenic arteries origin: preganglionic sympathetic fiber...
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Renal plexus

The renal plexus (plural: plexuses) is an autonomic nerve plexus and ganglia located in the upper abdomen and is a lateral perivascular extension of the aorticorenal plexus. Summary location: bilateral plexuses and ganglia lie on the renal arteries lateral to the aorticorenal plexuses origin:...
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Aorticorenal plexus

The aorticorenal plexus (plural: plexuses) is an autonomic nerve plexus and ganglia located in the upper abdomen and is an inferior perivascular extension of the larger celiac plexus. Some descriptions separate the aortic and aorticorenal plexuses but they are considerably interconnected and con...
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Hepatic plexus

The hepatic plexus (plural: plexuses) is an autonomic nerve plexus and ganglia  located in the upper abdomen. Most descriptions are of a periarterial extension of the celiac plexus along the common hepatic artery and portal vein. Summary location: the plexus and ganglia extends to the right fr...
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Inferior cervical ganglion

The inferior cervical ganglion (plural: ganglia) is the second largest ganglion of the cervical sympathetic trunk and provides autonomic innervation to the head and neck region. Gross anatomy The inferior cervical ganglion is formed by embryologically fused C7 and C8 sympathetic ganglia. It ha...
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Middle cervical ganglion

The middle cervical ganglion (plural: ganglia) is the smallest ganglion of the cervical sympathetic trunk and providing autonomic innervation to the head and neck region. Gross anatomy The middle cervical ganglion is formed by embryologically fused C5 and C6 sympathetic ganglia. It has superio...
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Celiac plexus

The celiac plexus (plural: plexuses) is an autonomic nerve plexus and ganglia in the upper abdomen. It is the largest major autonomic plexus. Summary location: the ganglion and plexus lie close to the celiac trunk origin: preganglionic sympathetic fibers via the greater and les...
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Ganglion impar

The ganglion impar, also know as the ganglion of Walther, is the midline autonomic ganglion located in the lower pelvis. It is the most distal convergence of the pelvic sympathetic chain which is usually located anterior to the coccyx.  It can be found anywhere between the sacrococcygeal joint a...
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Pulmonary plexus

The pulmonary plexus is a network of autonomic nerves and ganglia situated at the pulmonary hila of each lung which regulates bronchial smooth muscle tone, mucus secretion from submucosal glandular mucous secretion, vascular permeability and blood flow. It is derived from both the sympathetic an...
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Superior mesenteric plexus

The superior mesenteric plexus is an autonomic nerve plexus and ganglia located in the retroperitoneum. Summary location: the plexus and ganglia lie in the retroperitoneum at the origin of the superior mesenteric artery within the small bowel mesentery origin: formed from branches from ...
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Inferior mesenteric plexus

The inferior mesenteric plexus is an autonomic nerve plexus and ganglia located in the retroperitoneum. Summary location: the plexus and ganglia lie in the retroperitoneum at the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery origin: formed mainly from branches from the aorticorenal plexus some c...
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Gonads

The gonads (single: gonad) are the paired reproductive organs of humans responsible for the production of gametes and sex hormones. The anatomy of the gonadal arteries differs substantially between the sexes, hence they are covered separately: ovaries in the female located in the pelvis testes...
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Autonomic ganglia and plexuses

The autonomic ganglia and plexuses are a collection of ganglia where autonomic preganglionic neurons arising from the CNS synapse with postganglionic neurons outside the CNS, i.e. in the peripheral nervous system. Many of the ganglia contain nerves of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous ...
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Parasympathetic nervous system

The parasympathetic nervous system (PaNS/PNS), mediated by the head and neck ganglia and pelvic splanchnic nerves, is a major division of the autonomic nervous system. It is composed of general visceral afferent and efferent axons that allow for involuntary control of bodily functions via severa...
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Superior alveolar arteries

The superior alveolar arteries is a collective term for the following arteries: posterior superior alveolar artery: branch of the maxillary artery in the pterygopalatine fossa middle superior alveolar artery: small branch of the infraorbital artery anterior superior alveolar artery: branch of...
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Uncal artery

The uncal artery is a group of small vessels providing arterial supply predominantly to the uncus. It consists of numerous terminal branches (on average 7 branches per uncus) from major intracranial arteries 1, and it is sometimes subdivided into anterior uncal arteries and posterior uncal, or u...
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Carotid arteries

The carotid arteries is used as a collective term for: common carotid artery (CCA) and its two terminal branches external carotid artery (ECA) internal carotid artery (ICA) These arteries provide the vast majority of the arterial supply to the head and neck region and central nervous system...
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Suspensory ligaments of the middle ear ossicles

The suspensory ligaments of the middle ear ossicles are ligaments within the middle ear which attach the ossicles to the walls of the mesotympanum 1. The ligaments help the ossicles transmit sound from the tympanic membrane to the oval window. Gross anatomy Origins and insertions of the suspen...
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Athelia

Athelia is a rare congenital condition characterized by the absence of the nipple. This may occur unilaterally or bilaterally. Associations Poland syndrome ectodermal dysplasia 2
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Track vs tract

The terms track and tract are commonly mixed up in radiology and medicine (and often English more generally). Track Track in medicine refers to an artificially created path through something, a typical example being a "needle track" which is the narrow channel formed when a needle is inserted ...
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Nail unit (anatomy)

The nail unit or nail apparatus refers to a group of distal digital structures involved in the function and support of the nail plate. Gross anatomy Structures of the distal phalanx composing the nail unit include 1: nail plate nail matrix nail bed periungual soft tissues eponychium (cuti...
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Supraopticohypophyseal tract

The supraopticohypophyseal tract (TA: tractus supraopticohypophysialis) is one of the two major hypothalamohypophyseal neurosecretory tracts connecting the supraoptic nucleus and the paraventricular nucleus in the hypothalamus with the posterior pituitary (neurohypophysis). Gross anatomy Intra...
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Anococcygeal raphe

The anococcygeal raphe (plural: anococcygeal raphes or raphae) refers to the midline structure that connects the anorectal junction to the coccyx. It is composed of bilateral interdigitating fibers from the iliococcygeal and pubococcygeal muscles. The anococcygeal raphe is a thin, linear struct...
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Cerebellomedullary cisterns

Cerebellomedullary cisterns are basal cisterns located laterally and posteriorly around the medulla, between it and the adjacent cerebellum.  They are divided into paired lateral cerebellomedullary cisterns (located on either side of the medulla, directly inferior to the cerebellopontine cister...
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Accessory muscles of respiration

Accessory muscles of respiration refer to muscles that provide assistance to the main breathing muscles, mainly when additional power is needed, for example during exercise or those with airway pathologies (e.g. COPD) 1,2. During normal quiet breathing, inspiration is an active process primaril...
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Scalene muscles

The scalene muscles are a group of three closely related neck muscles. anterior scalene muscles middle scalene muscles posterior scalene muscles Summary origin: transverse processes of mid to lower cervical vertebrae (C2-C7).  insertion: first or second ribs. The anterior and middle insert...
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Basivertebral nerve

The basivertebral nerve supplies the vertebral endplates and can be a target for treating back pain.  Gross anatomy The basivertebral nerve is a paired nerve arising from the sinuvertebral nerve. It ascends from its origin to enter the spinal canal, traversing centrally 1. It courses with the ...
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Fibulotalocalcaneal ligament

The fibulotalocalcaneal ligament is part of the deep crural fascia and runs medially from the posteromedial border of the lateral malleolus (anterior malleolar groove) with two sheet-like laminae that insert on the superolateral surface of the calcaneus and the lateral tubercle of the posterior ...
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Paraventricular nucleus

The paraventricular nucleus is a group of neurosecretory cells in the hypothalamus that produce the hormones oxytocin and vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone). Gross anatomy The paraventricular nucleus is found in the medial area of the anterior hypothalamus immediately medial to the column of t...
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Cardinal ligament

The cardinal ligaments, also known as transverse cervical ligaments or Mackenrodt ligaments, are paired structures that act to support the pelvic organs of the female pelvis. These along with the uterosacral and pubocervical ligaments, provide support to prevent pelvic organ prolapse 1.  Gross ...
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Oral tori

Oral tori (singular torus) are benign bony outgrowths from the maxilla and mandible: maxillary tori a.k.a. torus palatinus mandibular tori a.k.a. torus mandibularis Oral tori are subcategorised according to their shape 1: flat spindle nodular lobular Although not usually called tori, fur...
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Persistent dorsal ophthalmic artery

The persistent dorsal ophthalmic artery is a rare anatomical variant of the ophthalmic artery. Instead of arising from the supraclinoid (C6) segment of the internal carotid artery, as is normally the case, the persistent dorsal ophthalmic artery arises from the lateral aspect of the cavernous (C...
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Right gastric vein

The right gastric vein, also known as pyloric vein, forms part of the venous drainage network of the stomach and proximal duodenum. It is a tributary of the portal vein. Gross anatomy Location The right gastric vein courses parallel to the right gastric artery adjacent to the lesser curvature...
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Paracingulate sulcus

The paracingulate sulcus is a secondary sulcus running anteroposteriorly in the medial surface of the frontal lobe above and parallel to the cingulate sulcus 1. It is only found in the great apes and only identified in 70-89% of humans 1.
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Depressor labii inferioris muscle

The depressor labii inferioris muscle, also known as quadratus labii inferioris muscle, is one of the facial muscles. Summary origin: oblique line of the mandible, medial to the mental foramen insertion:  ​modiolus at the angle of the mouth ascends to medially insert into lower lip innerva...
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Scapulothoracic bursa

Scapulothoracic bursae refer to a number of bursae that allow for the gliding movement of the scapulothoracic joint. Two major bursae have been reliably described 1,3: infraserratus (scapulothoracic) bursa: between the serratus anterior muscle and the chest wall supraserratus (subscapularis) ...
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Superior cervical ganglion

The superior cervical ganglion (plural: ganglia) is the largest ganglion of the cervical sympathetic trunk, providing autonomic innervation to the head and neck region 1. Gross anatomy The superior cervical ganglion is formed by embryologically fused C1 to C4 sympathetic ganglia. It is elongat...
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Ciliary muscle

The ciliary muscle (TA: musculus ciliaris) is located within the ciliary body of the eye. It acts to facilitate lens accommodation for near vision, and receives parasympathetic innervation from short ciliary nerves, arising from the oculomotor nerve via the ciliary ganglion. Gross anatomy The ...
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Dilator pupillae muscle

The dilator pupillae muscle is a ring of contractile cells within the iris. These cells are arranged radially, such that their contraction facilitates pupillary dilation (mydriasis). The dilator pupillae muscle receives innervation from the sympathetic nervous system. Gross anatomy The dilator...
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Sphincter pupillae muscle

The sphincter pupillae muscle is a circular ring of smooth muscle within the iris responsible for constriction of the pupil (miosis). The structure is stimulated by the parasympathetic nervous system causing the muscle to decrease in diameter as it contracts. Gross anatomy The sphincter pupill...
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Pharyngeal muscles

There are multiple pharyngeal muscles that make up the structure of the pharynx. They comprise circular and longitudinal muscles whose overall function is to propel food into the esophagus. Gross anatomy Outer/circular muscles These muscles comprise the outer layer of musculature and act to c...
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Persistent primitive olfactory artery

A persistent primitive olfactory artery (PPOA) is a rare variant of the proximal anterior cerebral artery 1,2. It is proposed to be more prone to aneurysms due to its sharp hairpin-like turn. Embryologically, the persistent primitive olfactory artery is the rostral division of the primitive inte...
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Ovary size and volume

Ovary size and volume is frequently determined with ultrasound. The volume estimate is calculated by the formula for an ellipsoid, where D1, D2, and D3 are the three axial measurements: D1 x D2 x D3 x 0.52 The normal, adult, non-pregnant, mean ovary volume of women who are not postmenopausal i...
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Suboccipital cavernous sinus

The suboccipital cavernous sinuses are paired venous plexuses that surround the horizontal (distal V3) portion of the vertebral arteries at the craniocervical junction. Its name derives from its resemblance to the cavernous sinus as it is a venous cushion surrounding a large arterial loop at the...
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Supraodontoid space

The supraodontoid space, also known as the supradental space or apical cave, is an extradural space at the anterior craniocervical junction superior to the odontoid process of C2 (dens axis). Gross anatomy Boundaries The space is a cave-shaped region facing posteriorly with the following boun...
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Hair

Hair (TA: pilus/pili) remains important physiologically and psychologically for humans. The hair shaft develops from a structure known as the hair follicle. Each hair has an arrector pili muscle and both sensory and sympathetic neural connections. Gross anatomy The hair shaft (TA: stipes pili)...
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Posterior superior aortic recess

The posterior superior aortic recess, (also known as the superior pericardial recess or the superior sinus) is one of the variable invaginations of the superior aortic recess and is located posterior to the ascending aorta. It may mimic mediastinal lymphadenopathy or a bronchogenic cyst.
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Posterior pericardial recess

The posterior pericardial recess is one of the pericardial recesses forming a small space within the pericardium. It arises from the superior margin of the oblique pericardial sinus, posterior to the right pulmonary artery and medial to the bronchus intermedius. It may mimic mediastinal lymphad...
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Talar tilt

Talar tilt is a measurement of the angle between the talus and the distal tibia, used in the assessment of ankle instability and ankle osteoarthritis (OA). Usage Talar tilt is an important measurement in the assessment of ankle osteoarthritis. It is measured as part of the Kellgren and Lawrenc...
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Nasal septal cartilage

The nasal septal cartilage, also known as quadrangular cartilage, forms most of the anterior portion of the nasal septum, and is one of five named nasal cartilaginous components supporting the external nose. Gross anatomy Most of the anterior one-third of the nasal septum is formed by the sept...
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Superficial epigastric vein

The superficial epigastric vein (TA: vena epigastrica superficialis) is an important tributary of the great saphenous vein that drains the anterior abdominal wall inferior to the level of the umbilicus. The superficial epigastric vein drains into the great saphenous vein at the saphenous openin...
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Lateral thoracic vein

The lateral thoracic vein (TA: vena thoracica lateralis) is a tributary of the axillary vein. It provides venous drainage for the axilla, anterolateral chest wall, including serratus anterior and pectoralis muscles and breast, and the supraumbilical abdominal wall. Terminology In some texts, t...
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Long head of biceps tendon

The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) is the proximal tendon of the long head of the biceps muscle and encircles the humeral head on its course. It has an intraarticular extrasynovial and an extraarticular portion. Summary location: shoulder insertion: supraglenoid tubercle of the scapula...
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Autonomic nervous system

The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is a subdivision of the peripheral nervous system. The autonomic system provides innervation of the involuntary muscles, i.e. myocardium and smooth muscle, and glands, through which fine control of homeostasis is maintained. The afferent innervation of the aut...
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Peripheral nervous system

The peripheral nervous system (PNS) consists of the nerves (cranial nerves III-XII and spinal) and their related ganglia outside the central nervous system (CNS). The latter comprising the brain and spinal cord. The central nervous system and peripheral nervous system together form the nervous s...
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Neurocranium

The neurocranium (plural: neurocrania) is the name given to the portion of the skull that encloses the brain. It comprises the skull base and the skull vault. The neurocranium and facial bones (viscerocranium) together form the skull.
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Nasolacrimal canal

The nasolacrimal canal is the short bony passage along which the nasolacrimal duct courses in the face.  Gross anatomy lateral wall lacrimal groove of the medial maxilla lacrimal hook of the lacrimal bone medial wall superiorly: lacrimal bone inferiorly: lacrimal process of the inferior n...
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Carotid cistern

The carotid cistern is one of the basal (subarachnoid) cisterns that surrounds the supraclinoid internal carotid artery. Gross anatomy Relations and/or Boundaries The carotid cistern lies between these brain structures: medially: the optic chiasm and nerve laterally: the mesial temporal lob...
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Central nervous system

The central nervous system (CNS) is the part of the nervous system that includes the brain and spinal cord. Gross anatomy The main components of the CNS are the brain and spinal cord. In addition, the CNS includes the optic nerves (cranial nerve II), retinas, olfactory nerves (cranial nerve I)...
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Oropharyngeal isthmus

The oropharyngeal isthmus, a.k.a. isthmus of fauces, is the relative constriction of the anterior oropharynx that borders the oral cavity. The isthmus is sometimes described as the passage that transitions between the oral cavity and pharynx, but strictly speaking, it is part of the oropharynx. ...
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Superior hypogastric plexus

The superior hypogastric plexus is an autonomic nerve plexus and ganglia located in the lower abdomen. Summary location: the plexus and ganglia lie anterior to the aortic bifurcation extending inferiorly between the common iliac arteries and along the left common iliac vein and median sacral v...
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Modiolus (disambiguation)

The modiolus (plural: modioli) may refer to one of two different anatomical structures, both in the head and neck region: modiolus (cochlea) modiolus (mouth) History and etymology The Latin word, "modiolus" means hub of a wheel, and is well-named, as in both the cochlea and at the angle of t...
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Modiolus (mouth)

The modiolus (plural: modioli), also known as the modiolus anguli oris or commissural modiolus, is a small fibromuscular structure at the corner of the mouth where fibers from multiple facial muscles converge, and helps coordinate the action of these muscles. Gross anatomy The convergence of t...
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Gomphosis

A gomphosis (plural: gomphoses), also known as the dentoalveolar syndesmosis, is the specific name for the fibrous joint between the teeth and the alveolar bone of the maxilla/mandible 1,2.
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Incisivus labii inferioris muscle

The incisivus labii inferioris muscle (TA: pars labialis musculi orbicularis oris) is one of the facial muscles. It acts as a supplementary muscle to the orbicularis oris muscle. Terminology The incisivus labii inferioris muscle is often omitted from major anatomical texts or articles on the f...
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Commissure (disambiguation)

A commissure (TA: commissura) is a location at which two anatomical structures are united. Though the term most commonly refers to the commissures in the brain, there are a number which exist in the human body:  central nervous system corpus callosum anterior commissure posterior commissure ...
Article

Right atrial appendage

The right atrial appendage, also known as the right auricule (TA) or auricle, is a trapezoidal pouch forming the anterosuperior part of the right atrium. Pacemaker/defibrillator leads are often placed at this site. Gross anatomy The right atrial appendage is delineated from the rest of the rig...
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Egyptian eye sign

"Egyptian eye sign" or "sonographic eye sign" refers to the normal appearance of great saphenous vein on ultrasound, in transverse view 1-2. Ultrasound examination of the great saphenous vein shows echogenic fascia surrounding it, with the saphenous fascia superiorly and the muscular fascia inf...
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Trochlea (eye)

The trochlea is a cartilaginous structure acting as a pulley for the superior oblique muscle of the eye.  Gross anatomy The trochlea inserts on the trochlear fovea and spine located on the anteromedial part of the orbital roof. The tendon of superior oblique muscle passes through it 1. Functi...
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Interstitial cells of Cajal

The interstitial cells of Cajal are mesenchymal cells closely apposed to neural and smooth muscle cells of the gut. They form a heterogeneous group with differing ultrastructure and functions. One cell type has an ancillary neural function as a gastrointestinal pacemaker, generating electrical s...
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Scapular medial rotation

Scapular medial rotation describes the rotation of the scapula (scapulothoracic joint) such that the glenoid fossa faces downwards - thus it may also be called downward rotation. It is the opposite of scapular lateral rotation - similarly, this motion requires motion at the sternoclavicular and ...
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Scapular lateral rotation

Scapular lateral rotation describes the rotation of the scapula (scapulothoracic joint) such that the glenoid fossa faces upwards - thus it may also be called upward rotation. This motion allows elevation of the humerus as seen in abduction of the arm. It is almost always associated with scapula...
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Scapular retraction

Scapular retraction describes the backward movement of the scapula about the thoracic wall (scapulothoracic joint). As the scapula moves towards the midline it can also be referred to as scapular adduction. The opposite motion is scapular protraction. The muscles that act as primary movers are ...
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Scapular protraction

Scapular protraction describes the forward movement of the scapula about the thoracic wall (scapulothoracic joint). As the scapula moves away from the midline it can also be referred to as scapular abduction. This motion usually occurs in conjunction with some scapular lateral rotation. This mov...
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Scapular depression

Scapular depression refers to the caudal motion of the scapula (scapulothoracic joint). In most instances, depression of the scapula is a passive process (due to gravity) that is facilitated by movement at the acromioclavicular joint. Occasionally some muscular attachments serve as active depres...
Article

Scapular elevation

Scapular elevation refers to the cranial motion of the scapula (scapulothoracic joint), commonly described as “shrugging the shoulders”. This movement is facilitated by several muscles and it is useful to distinguish these as primary movers and stabilizers. It is important to note that no one mo...
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Subseptate uterus

A subseptate uterus is a mild form congenital uterine anomaly (often considered as a normal variant) where there is a presence of a partial septum within the uterus not extending to the cervix and with the central point of the septum at an acute (<90°) angle. The external uterine contour is unif...
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Deep artery of the penis

The deep artery of the penis, also known as cavernosal artery, is one of the two terminal branches of the internal pudendal artery. Gross anatomy Origin The internal pudendal artery bifurcates terminally into the deep artery of the penis and the dorsal artery of the penis at the anterior marg...
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Dorsal artery of the penis

The dorsal artery of the penis is one of the two terminal branches of the internal pudendal artery.  Gross anatomy Origin The internal pudendal artery bifurcates into the deep artery of the penis and the dorsal artery of the penis at the anterior margin of the perineal membrane 1. Terminatio...
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Artery to the bulb

The artery to the bulb of the penis (male) or vestibule (female) is a branch of the internal pudendal artery. It differs slightly in males and females.   Artery to the bulb of the penis Origin: internal pudendal artery, distal to the perineal artery1. a common penile artery, serving as the or...

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