Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

908 results found
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Cicatrisation atelectasis

Cicatrisation atelectasis is a form of lung atelectasis which occurs as a result of scarring or fibrosis that reduces lung expansion. Cicatrisation atelectasis is classic in tuberculosis. The term is closely related to cicatrisation collapse when an entire lobe is collapsed from the same process...
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Clavicle tumors

Clavicle tumors may be malignant or benign. Malignant metastases prostate breast cervix ovary urinary bladder carcinoid osteosarcoma osteosarcoma lymphoma primary metastatic Benign osteoma: uncommon, sclerotic, hamartomatous surface lesion enchondroma: rare, geographic, intramedu...
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Clival masses

The differential of a mass involving or arising from the clivus is a relatively narrow one and can be divided into whether the lesion arises from the skull base itself, the intracranial compartment above or the base of skull below. When evaluating the clivus it is important to compare the marro...
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Coarse macrocalcifications within the breast

Coarse macrocalcifications within the breast are a morphological descriptive term for a type of breast calcification.  Associations   involuting fibroadenomas ( classical popcorn calcification ) chronic renal disease with hypercalcemia 1  rarely seen in malignancy  2 invasive breast carcin...
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Codman triangle periosteal reaction

A Codman triangle is a type of periosteal reaction seen with aggressive bone lesions. The periosteum does not have time to ossify with shells of new bone (e.g. as seen in a single layer and multilayered periosteal reaction) in aggressive lesions, so only the edge of the raised periosteum will os...
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Coin lesion (lung)

A coin lesion refers to a round or oval, well-circumscribed solitary pulmonary lesion. It is usually 1-5 cm in diameter and calcification may or may not be present 1,3. Typically but not always the patient is asymptomatic 1.  Differential diagnosis The differential diagnosis for such lesions i...
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Colonic stricture

Colonic strictures can be long (>10 cm) or short. Short scirrhous colorectal carcinoma (apple core sign) post surgical (anastamotic stricture) Long malignancy scirrhous colorectal carcinoma gastrointestinal lymphoma inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis Crohn disease post radi...
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Colpocephaly

Colpocephaly is a descriptive term for a disproportionate prominence of the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles. It can result from a wide range of congenital insults. Clinical presentation Patients may present with motor abnormalities, cognitive deficit, visual abnormalities, and seizur...
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Communicating hydrocephalus

Communicating hydrocephalus is a type of hydrocephalus where CSF is able to leave the ventricular system.  Terminology Communicating hydrocephalus is commonly used as the opposite of obstructive hydrocephalus which leads to much unnecessary confusion, as most causes of communicating hydrocepha...
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Companion shadows

Companion shadows are smooth, homogeneous, radiopaque shadows running parallel along the bones. In a study of 700 chest radiographs, Ben Felson found that 75% had companion shadows on the lower ribs 3. Radiographic features They appear secondary to soft tissues and intercostal muscles running ...
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Complications following gastric banding

There are many complications that can occur following gastric banding. It is helpful to divide these into early and late post-surgical complications. Clinical presentation Although the exact mode of presentation can vary depending on the underlying complication common modes of presentation tha...
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Complications of cranial radiotherapy

Complications of cranial radiation therapy are fairly common, particularly in long-term survivors, and especially in pediatric patients. Cranial radiotherapy is used for a variety of brain tumors, either in isolation or in combination with concurrent chemotherapy. Complications from irradiation...
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Complications of total hip arthroplasty

Complications of total hip arthroplasty are common and it is essential for the radiologist to be aware of them in the assessment of radiographs of total hip replacements. Complications are many and can occur at various time intervals following the initial surgery: aseptic loosening: considered ...
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Complications post optical colonoscopy

Complications post optical colonoscopy are most commonly assessed by CT if patients present with abdominal symptoms post colonoscopy. Complications include: bowel perforation (most common) pneumoperitoneum pneumoretroperitoneum pneumomediastinum pneumothorax lower gastrointestinal hemorrha...
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Compressive atelectasis

Compressive atelectasis refers to a form of lung atelectasis due to compression by a space-occupying process. Some authors describe it as a subtype of compressive (relaxation) atelectasis where the reduction in lung volume is greater than its normal relaxed state 1. Whereas others describe it a...
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Conditions involving skin and bone

There are many conditions that can involve both skin and bone. osteolytic bone lesions congenital neurofibromatosis basal cell nevus syndrome angiodysplasias acquired scleroderma rheumatoid arthritis gout leprosy syphilis actinomycosis langerhans cell histiocytosis sarcoidosis mas...
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Conductive hearing loss

Conductive hearing loss is a hearing loss where the ears' ability to conduct sound into the inner ear is blocked or reduced. It can be caused by a range of developmental, congenital or acquired pathology to the external, middle or inner ear. Pathology Essentially any process that obstructs or ...
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Congenital anomalies of the male urethra

Congenital anomalies of the male urethra include various anomalies due to complex development of urethra. These anomalies can be isolated or in association with other coexisting anomalies. They can be categorized as following: congenital valves  posterior urethral valve anterior urethral valv...
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Congenital calvarial defects

Congenital calvarial defects are a group of disorders characterized by congenital calvarial bone defects that vary in severity. Radiographic features CT with 3D shaded surface reformats is the best imaging tool as it demonstrates calvarial defects and bone margins: parietal foramina parietal...
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Congenital limb amputation

Congenital limb amputation is the absence of a fetal limb or part of a limb that usually occurs due to disruption of vascular supply. Epidemiology Congenital amputations occur in 0.5 (range 0.03-1) per 1000 live births 2.  Pathology They are slightly more common in the upper limb (60%) than ...
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Congenital renal anomalies

Congenital renal anomalies comprise of vast spectrum of pathologies and include: renal agenesis renal dysgenesis congenital renal hypoplasia congenital megacalyectasis congenital cystic renal disease infantile polycystic renal disease: autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD):...
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Congenital syndromes associated with enlarged ventricles

Congenital ventriculomegaly can have a large number of syndromic associations. Common acrocephalosyndactylies Apert syndrome Pfeiffer syndrome acrocephalopolysyndactylies Crouzon syndrome  achondroplasia fetal alcohol syndrome lissencephaly osteopetrosis Sotos syndrome  X-linked hyd...
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Congestive hepatopathy

Congestive hepatopathy includes a spectrum of hepatic derangements that can occur in the setting of right-sided heart failure (and its underlying causes). If there is subsequent hepatic fibrosis the term cardiac cirrhosis may be used. The condition can rarely occur as a result of non-cardiac cau...
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Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage

Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhages (cSAH) are non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhages that occur within the surface sulci of the brain (cf. basal cisternal distribution of aneurysmal SAH). Pathology There are various causes of convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage, some of which include: dural venou...
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Coronal vertebral cleft

Coronal vertebral clefts refer to the presence of radiolucent vertical defects on a lateral radiograph.   Epidemiology It is most often seen in premature male infants 1,3. As they can occur as part of normal variation (especially in the lower thoracic-upper lumbar spine of premature infants) t...
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Cortical nephrocalcinosis

Renal cortical nephrocalcinosis is ~20 times less common than medullary nephrocalcinosis. Pathology Etiology renal cortical necrosis: common 2 renal infarction/ischemia sepsis toxemia of pregnancy drugs snake bites arsenic poisoning extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) hemolyt...
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Coup-contrecoup injury (brain)

A coup-contrecoup injury is a term applied to head injuries and most often cerebral contusions and traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage. It refers to the common pattern of injury whereby damage is located both at the site of impact (often less marked) and on the opposite side of the head to the poi...
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Craniovertebral junction anomalies

Craniovertebral junction (CVJ) anomalies can be congenital, developmental or due to malformation secondary to any acquired disease process. These anomalies can lead to cranial nerve compression, vertebral artery compression and obstructive hydrocephalus. Pathology The craniovertebral junction ...
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Crazy paving

Crazy paving refers to the appearance of ground-glass opacity with superimposed interlobular septal thickening and intralobular septal thickening, seen on chest HRCT. It is a non-specific finding that can be seen in a number of conditions.  Pathology Etiology Common causes: acute respiratory...
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Cutaneous calcifications in breast imaging

Cutaneous calcifications in breast imaging can form in dermal sweat glands after low grade folliculitis and inspissation of sebaceous material. Calcifications may also form in moles and other skin lesions. The vast majority of calcifications are coincidental findings on mammography. Radiographi...
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Cyanotic congenital heart disease

A number of entities can present as cyanotic congenital heart disease. These can be divided into those with increased (pulmonary plethora) or decreased pulmonary vascularity : increased pulmonary vascularity total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) (types I and II) transposition of the...
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Cystic breast mass

A cystic breast mass is a mass that contains both solid and fluid components. This can occur from both benign and malignant causes. Benign complex breast hematoma complex breast abscess breast cyst with associated inflammation and hemorrhage galactocoele fibrocystic changes and oil cysts 2...
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Cystic fibrosis (musculoskeletal manifestations)

The musculoskeletal manifestations of cystic fibrosis are uncommon compared to the well known respiratory manifestations.  For general discussion of cystic fibrosis, and a discussion of its other manifestations, please refer to: cystic fibrosis (parent article) pulmonary manifestations of cys...
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Cystic hepatic metastases

Cystic hepatic metastases are included in the differential for new cystic liver lesions. The internal cystic component may represent necrosis as the tumor outgrows its hepatic blood supply, or it may represent a mucinous component, similar to the primary tumor. The liver and lungs are the most ...
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Cystic lesions around vagina and female urethra

There several cystic lesions around the vagina and female urethra; some of the imaging differential considerations would include: urethral diverticulum Gartner duct cyst: at or above the level of the pubic symphysis anterior to the vaginal wall Bartholin gland cyst: posterolateral to distal v...
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Cystic lesions of the liver (differential)

Cystic lesions of liver carry a broad differential diagnosis. These include: simple cysts simple hepatic cyst biliary hamartoma Caroli disease adult polycystic liver disease ciliated hepatic foregut duplication cyst 6 infectious: inflammatory conditions hepatic abscess pyogenic hepatic ...
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Cystic lesions of the pancreas (differential)

The differential for cystic lesions of the pancreas includes: unilocular pancreatic pseudocyst intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) serous cystadenoma uncommonly uni/macrolocular simple pancreatic cyst pancreatic cysts occur in association with  von Hippel Lindau syndrome autos...
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Cystic lesions of the testes

Testicular cystic lesions are a relatively common occurrence on testicular ultrasound. They result from widely variable pathological entities ranging from benign to malignant. These entities include: simple testicular cyst tunica albuginea cyst (mesothelial cyst) cystic transformation of rete...
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Cystic lung disease

Cystic lung disease is an umbrella term used to group the conditions coursing with multiple lung cysts.  Clinical presentation The clinical presentation is an important clue to the differential diagnosis of cystic lung diseases 12. Diseases that present with insidious dyspnea or spontaneous p...
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Cystic lung lesions (pediatric)

Cystic lesions in pediatric patients are usually congenital lesions and, as such, can be seen antenatally and following delivery. Pathology Etiology Congenital These congenital lesions are predominantly covered by the overarching diagnosis of bronchopulmonary foregut malformation. This is a ...
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Cystic mass adjacent to the angle of mandible (differential)

The differential diagnosis of a cystic mass adjacent to the angle of mandible includes: 2nd branchial cleft cyst lymphatic malformation (lymphangioma) cystic lymphadenopathy from tuberculosis from metastatic squamous cell carcinoma  from metastatic papillary thyroid cancer See also cys...
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Cystic mediastinal masses

The differential diagnosis for cystic masses of the mediastinum include: bronchogenic cyst esophageal duplication cyst neuroenteric cyst pericardial cyst meningocele lymphangioma thymic cyst cystic teratoma of mediastinum cystic degeneration of an intrathoracic tumor mediastinal thorac...
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Cystic (necrotic) lymph nodes

Cystic or necrotic appearing lymph nodes can be caused by a number of infectious, inflammatory or malignant conditions: Systemic squamous cell carcinoma metastases treated lymphoma leukemia plasmacytoid T-cell leukemia acute myeloid leukemia viral lymphadenitis herpes simplex lymphadenit...
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Cystic parotid lesions

The differential for cystic parotid lesions includes: bilateral cystic parotid lesions Warthin tumor benign lymphoepithelial lesions of HIV Sjögren syndrome sialoceles unilateral cystic parotid lesion(s) Warthin tumor sialocele first branchial cleft cyst parotid lymphangioma benign ly...
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Cystic pulmonary metastases

Cystic pulmonary metastases are atypical morphological form on pulmonary metastases where lesions manifest as distinct cystic lesions. It is slightly different from the term cavitating pulmonary metastases in that the lesions are extremely thin walled. Pathology It has been reported with many ...
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Cystic retroperitoneal lesions

Cystic retroperitoneal lesions can carry a relatively broad differential, which includes: retroperitoneal lymphangioma retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenoma retroperitoneal cystic teratoma retroperitoenal cystic mesothelioma pseudomyxoma retroperitonei with cystic change perianal mucinous c...
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Cystic spinal cord lesions

A cystic spinal lesion can result from a number of disease entities. They include: Primary Chiari malformations Dandy walker malformation diastematomyelia spinal dysraphism certain skeletal dysplasias 2 achondroplasia tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome type I Acquired due to a tumor ast...
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Cyst-like lesions around the knee

There is broad differential for cyst-like lesions around the knee.  Differential diagnosis Cysts synovial cyst popliteal synovial cyst - Baker cyst ganglion cyst intra-articular ganglion cyst ACL ganglion cyst PCL ganglion cyst Hoffa fat pad ganglion cyst extra-articular ganglion cyst ...
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Cytotoxic lesions of the corpus callosum (CLOCCs)

Cytotoxic lesions of the corpus callosum (CLOCCs) represent a collection of disparate conditions that can cause signal change in the corpus callosum, usually involving the splenium.  Terminology The term cytotoxic lesions of the corpus callosum (CLOCCs) has been proposed recently 12 as a more ...
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Delayed bone age

A generalized retardation in skeletal maturation has different causative or etiological factors, these can be classified as follows: chronic ill health congenital heart disease (especially cyanotic) chronic renal disease inflammatory bowel disease malnutrition: failure to thrive (FTT) rick...
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Delayed myocardial enhancement on MRI (differential)

Delayed myocardial enhancement can occur in cardiac MR assessment due to a number of causes. They include: myocardial ischemia: typically subendocardial and follows a vascular territory 1 non-ischemic cardiomyopathies hypertrophic cardiomyopathy non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy arrhythm...
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Demyelinating disorders

Demyelinating disorders are a subgroup of white matter disorders characterized by the destruction or damage of normally myelinated structures. These disorders may be inflammatory, infective, ischemic or toxic in origin and include 1-7: autoimmune demyelination multiple sclerosis (MS) Marburg ...
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Dense base of the skull (differential)

The differential diagnosis for a dense base of the skull includes: Fibrous dysplasia Paget's disease Camurati-Engelmann disease Van Buchem disease osteopetrosis pyknodysostosis meningioma sclerosteosis  
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Dense metaphyseal bands (differential)

The differential diagnosis of dense metaphyseal bands is wide. Differential diagnosis Common chronic anemia, e.g. sickle cell disease, thalassemia chemotherapy, e.g. methotrexate growth acceleration lines following growth arrest due to systemic illness or stress in infancy or childhood, e.g...
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Dextrocardia

Dextrocardia is a congenital cardiac malrotation in which the heart is situated on the right side of the body (dextroversion) with the apex pointing to the right. Terminology Dextrocardia merely refers to the laterality of the heart, it says nothing about the orientation of the patient's other...
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Diaphragmatic paralysis

Diaphragmatic paralysis (also considered very similar to the term diaphragmatic palsy) can be unilateral or bilateral. Clinical presentation Clinical features are highly variable according to underlying etiological factor: unilateral paralysis: asymptomatic in most of the patients as the othe...
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Diaphragmatic rupture

Diaphragmatic rupture often results from blunt abdominal trauma. The mechanism of injury is typically a motor-vehicle collision. Epidemiology Given that the most common mechanism is motor vehicle collisions, it is perhaps unsurprising that young men are most frequently affected. The estimated ...
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Diaphyseal lesions

Diaphyseal lesions are unsurprisingly predominantly found centered in the diaphysis.  Differential diagnosis simple bone cyst fibrous dysplasia enchondroma metastases myeloma / plasmacytoma lymphoma osteomyelitis osteoid osteoma round cell tumor, e.g. Ewing sarcoma (children) bone inf...
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Differential diagnoses for temporal lobe tumors

Most tumors of the CNS can potentially occur in the temporal lobe, but entities with a predilection for being diagnosed in this location include: pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) ganglioglioma pilocytic astrocytoma dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET) multinodular and vacuolatin...
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Differential diagnosis for a small cardiothoracic ratio

A small cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) is defined as <42%/0.42 when assessed on a PA chest radiograph, and is often called small heart syndrome. A pathologically-small heart is also known as microcardia.It can be due to/associated with a number of entities: adrenal insufficiency, e.g. Addison disea...
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Differential diagnosis for bleeding in pregnancy

Uterine bleeding during pregnancy is a common clinical presentation that often necessitates obstetric ultrasound for the assessment of the hemorrhage, and of fetal well being. The potential causes vary with the stage of gestation. Bleeding in the first trimester miscarriage threatened miscar...
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Differential diagnosis for calcified masses in the mandible

Differential diagnosis for calcified masses in the mandible includes: calcifying odontogenic cyst (Gorlin cyst) calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) fibrous dysplasia foreign body odontoma cemento-ossifying fibroma osteoma synovial osteochondromatosis focal sclerosi...
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Differential diagnosis for metatarsal region pain

Forefoot pain in the metatarsal region is a common complaint and may be caused by a number of conditions. It is worthwhile for a radiologist to have knowledge of the potential causes and their imaging features 1. Pathology Etiology Trauma turf toe plantar plate disruption sesamoiditis str...
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Differential diagnosis of free fluid in cul de sac (pouch of Douglas)

The cul-de-sac, also known as the pouch of Douglas or rectouterine pouch, is an extension of the postero-inferior reflection of the peritoneal fold between the uterus (anteriorly) and rectum (posteriorly). It is the most inferior aspect of the peritoneal cavity and therefore the first location w...
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Differential diagnosis of vascular calcification

The differential diagnosis of vascular calcification is very wide with many common and uncommon conditions. Differential diagnosis Common aneurysm atherosclerosis end-stage renal failure 3 hemangioma; arteriovenous malformation hyperparathyroidism, primary or secondary (renal osteodystrop...
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Differential for an anterosuperior mediastinal mass

An anterosuperior mediastinal mass can be caused by neoplastic and non-neoplastic pathology. As their name suggests, they are confined to the anterior mediastinum, that portion of the mediastinum anterior to the pericardium and below the level of the clavicles.  The differential diagnosis for a...
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Diffuse airway narrowing

Diffuse airway narrowing can occur from a number of pathologies. These include relapsing polychondritis ulcerative colitis amyloidosis: tracheobronchial sarcoidosis granulomatosis with polyangiitis tracheopathia osteochondroplastica various infections including tracheobronchial papilloma...
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Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage

Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a subset of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage when bleeding is diffuse and directly into the alveolar spaces. It can occur in a vast number of clinical situations and can be life-threatening. Pathology Blood tends to fill alveolar spaces at multiple sites. Etio...
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Diffuse cerebellar atrophy

Diffuse atrophy of the cerebellum refers to a progressive and irreversible reduction in cerebellar volume. It is a relatively common finding and found in a wide variety of clinical scenarios.  Terminology Diffuse cerebellar atrophy can be difficult to distinguish from global cerebellar hypopla...
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Diffuse colonic nodularity (differential)

Diffuse colonic nodularity on barium enema or CT colonography has a range of possible etiologies: lymphoid hyperplasia (tend to be small and discrete) lymphoma (tend to be larger nodules and confluent) urticaria (closely spaced polygonal lesions, history is often helpful) pseudomembranous co...
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Diffuse gallbladder wall thickening (differential)

Diffuse thickening of the gallbladder wall can occur in a number of situations: cholecystitis acute cholecystitis chronic cholecystitis gallbladder empyema 7 xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis 11 acalculous cholecystitis11 postprandial physiological state (pseudothickening) gallbladder o...
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Diffusely increased bone marrow FDG uptake

A diffuse homogeneous bone marrow FDG uptake usually reflects hyperplastic bone marrow which can be seen in the following conditions: therapy-related granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) post-chemotherapy erythropoietin pathological process myelodysplastic syndromes beta-thalasse...
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Diffuse pleural thickening

Diffuse pleural thickening refers to a morphological type of pleural thickening. It can occur from malignant as well as nonmalignant causes, which include: diffuse pleural fibrosis / fibrothorax 6 asbestos related pleural disease: typically seen a continuous sheet of pleural thickening often i...
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Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage

Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage (DPH) is a subtype of pulmonary hemorrhage where bleeding into the lung is diffuse. If the bleeding is into the alveolar spaces this can be further subclassified as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH). Clinical presentation While the exact presentation can vary is ha...
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Diffuse pulmonary nodules

Diffuse pulmonary nodules are usually seen as multiple pulmonary nodular opacifications on a HRCT chest scan. They can signify disease processes affecting either the interstitium or the airspace. They can range from a few millimeters to up to 1 cm and when very small and numerous there can be so...
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Diffuse small bowel disease

Diffuse small bowel disease may be caused by a number of conditions may be generalized multisystem disorders or conditions that effect the bowel in a global fashion: sprue scleroderma Whipple's disease amyloidosis hypoproteinemia giardiasis intramural hemorrhage radiation enteritis smal...
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Diffuse T1 bone marrow signal loss

Diffuse T1 vertebral bone marrow signal loss is associated with replacement of fatty marrow by edema or cellular tissue. T1-weighted imaging without fat suppression is one of the most important sequences for distinguishing between normal and abnormal bone marrow. In the case of homogenous involv...
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Diffuse tracheal narrowing

Conditions associated with diffuse tracheal narrowing or collapse include (in alphabetical order): amyloidosis chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): saber sheath trachea granulomatosis with polyangiitis tracheobronchial tuberculosis 3 tracheomalacia/tracheobronchomalacia (due to col...
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Dilated ducts on breast imaging (differential)

Dilated ducts on breast imaging may be seen on many breast imaging modalities and can arise from a number of causes which can be both benign or malignant. physiological lactational changes mammary duct ectasia breast neoplasm 2-3
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Discrete colonic ulceration

Discrete colonic ulcerations are nonspecific findings, and can be due to: Crohn disease infective colitis Yersinia entercolitis shigellosis tuberculosis cytomegalovirus (CMV) amoebic colitis vasculitic colitis Behcet disease
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Disorganized periosteal reaction

Disorganized or complex periosteal reaction has spicules with random orientation and appearance. It can be seen in highly aggressive processes: osteosarcoma metastasis osteomyelitis chondrosarcoma Ewing sarcoma stress fracture malignant fibrous histiocytoma spindle cell sarcoma See also...
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Distal clavicular erosion (differential)

Erosion or absence of the distal ends of the clavicles may be seen in a wide range of conditions. Differential diagnosis Bilateral erosions weightlifter's shoulder: due to repetitive microtrauma; classically described in weightlifters, but can affect anyone performing repetitive overhead lift...
Article

Double bubble sign (duodenum)

The double bubble sign is seen in infants and represents dilatation of the proximal duodenum and stomach. It is seen in both radiographs and ultrasound, and can be identified antenatally 2. Pathology Causes include 1,2: congenital obstruction duodenal web duodenal atresia duodenal stenosis...
Article

Drug and toxin induced pulmonary hypertension

Drug and toxin induced pulmonary hypertension is one of the causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension. It falls under group 1.3 under the Dana point classification system of pulmonary hypertension.  Pathology A wide range of difference drugs have been associated with developing pulmonary hyper...
Article

Drug-induced lung disease

Drug-induced lung disease can result from a number of agents and may have a myriad of presentations, ranging from an adult respiratory distress syndrome type picture to established pulmonary fibrosis. Due to this, it can be extremely difficult to pinpoint the offending agent on imaging appearan...
Article

Dural arteriovenous shunts

Dural arteriovenous shunts (DAVS) are rare congenital arteriovenous malformations (CAVMs). On the basis of clinical and anatomical features DAVS have three different types: dural sinus malformations (DSMs) infantile or juvenile DAVS (IDAVS) adult DAVS (ADAVS)
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Dural ectasia

Dural ectasia refers to ballooning or widening of the dural sac which can result in posterior vertebral scalloping and is associated with herniation of nerve root sleeves. Clinical presentation Patients with dural ectasia may present with low back pain or radicular pain in the buttocks or legs...
Article

Dural enhancement

Pachymeningeal enhancement, also known as dura-arachnoid enhancement 4, refers to a dural and outer layer of arachnoid pattern of enhancement seen following contrast administration and may occur in the conditions listed below: infection intracranial tumor metastases intracranial hypotension ...
Article

Dural masses

Dural masses can be the result of a number of different tumors and conditions, although meningiomas are by far the most common. The differential of a dural mass includes: meningioma hemangiopericytoma primary dural lymphoma Rosai-Dorfman disease solitary fibrous tumor of the dura primary i...
Article

Dynamic tracheal collapse

Dynamic tracheal collapse refers to collapse of the trachea during expiration. It is perhaps best assessed on CT in the end expiratory phase. An inspiratory series is also useful for comparative purposes. The term excessive dynamic airway collapse (EDAC) refers to abnormal and exaggerated bulgin...
Article

Dysphagia

Dysphagia refers to subjective awareness of difficulty or obstruction during swallowing. It is a relatively common and increasingly prevalent clinical problem. Odynophagia is the term for painful swallowing. Fluoroscopy is the mainstay of imaging assessment but manometry can help evaluate the e...
Article

Dystrophic soft tissue calcification

Dystrophic soft tissue calcification is a type of soft-tissue calcification, which occurs in damaged or necrotic tissue, while the serum level is normal. It may progess to ossification, in which case a cortical and trabecular bone pattern is visible. An often cited approach to developing a diff...
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Echogenic fetal lung lesions

Echogenic fetal lung lesions on antenatal ultrasound can be detected in a number of situations. They include: Airway obstructions: lung are often enlarged and echogenic bilaterally congenital high airways obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) tracheal atresia congenital tracheal stenosis laryngeal a...

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