Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

119 results found
Article

Abdominal opacities

An opacity projecting over the abdomen has a broad differential. Possibilities to consider include: foreign bodies ingested, e.g. coins, batteries, bones, etc artifacts, e.g. object attached to the cloth of the patient like a safety pin or button iatrogenic, e.g. haemostatic clips, gastric b...
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Abdominal trauma

Abdominal trauma is usually divided into blunt and penetrating trauma. Findings of abdominal trauma haemoperitoneum splenic trauma: most common hepatic trauma renal trauma pancreatic trauma gastrointestinal tract (bowel) trauma: proximal jejunum is most commonly affected by blunt trauma,...
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Abnormal bowel wall attenuation patterns

Abnormal bowel wall attenuation patterns on CT scan can be grouped under five categories: white enhancement gray enhancement water halo sign fat halo sign black attenuation The first three patterns are seen on contrast studies. White enhancement It is defined as uniform enhancement of th...
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Abscess

Abscesses are focal confined collections of suppurative inflammatory material and can be thought of as having three components 1: a central core consisting of necrotic inflammatory cells and local tissue peripheral halo of viable neutrophils surrounded by a 'capsule' with dilated blood vessel...
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Acute gastritis

Acute gastritis is a broad term that encompasses a myriad of causes of gastric mucosal inflammation. Epidemiology  Depends on the aetiology (see below). Clinical presentation asymptomatic epigastric pain/tenderness nausea and vomiting loss of appetite Pathology Aetiology infection: H. ...
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AFP elevation

Human alpha fetoprotein (AFP) elevation may occur in a vast number of conditions: liver tumours (hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatoblastoma) <10 ng/ml is within normal limits >20 ng/ml is above normal limits but has low specificity for tumor since it may occur in a setting of diffuse liver inju...
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AIDS defining illness

AIDS defining illnesses are conditions that in the setting of a HIV infection confirm the diagnosis of AIDS, and do not commonly occur in immunocompetent individuals 2. According to the CDC surveillance case definition 1, they are: Infectious bacterial infections: multiple or recurrent candid...
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Ampullary tumour

The term ampullary tumour generally refers to either benign or malignant neoplasms that arise from the glandular epithelium of the ampulla of Vater, including 1: ampullary adenoma (adenoma of ampulla of Vater) ampullary carcinoma (carcinoma of ampulla of Vater) According to some authors, ampu...
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Aphthoid ulceration

Aphthoid ulcers are shallow ulcers of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Pathology Aetiology infective inflammatory conditions Yersinia enterocolitis amoebic enterocolitis cytomegalovirus enterocolitis noninfective inflammatory conditions Crohn disease idiopathic granulomatous gastritis vasc...
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Areae gastricae

Areae gastricae are a normal finding on double contrast images of the stomach. Radiographic features fine reticular network of barium-coated grooves between 1-5 mm islands/areas of gastric mucosa may be seen in ~70-80% of patients if there is adequate high-density barium coating of the stomac...
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Asbestos related diseases

Asbestos related disease, in particular affecting the lung, comprise of a broad spectrum of entities related to the inhalational exposure to asbestos fibres. They can be divided into benign and malignant changes 1-3. Benign pleural and parenchymal lung disease asbestos related benign pleural d...
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Barium peritonitis

Barium peritonitis is a rare complication of gastrointestinal fluoroscopy, and occurs when there is gastrointestinal tract perforation and spillage of barium into the peritoneal cavity.  Pathology Barium in the peritoneal cavity is treated as a foreign body with resultant immune response that ...
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Benign oesophageal lesions

Benign oesophageal lesions are less symptomatic than malignant oesophageal lesions, making up for only 1% of clinically apparent oesophageal lesions. Pathology oesophageal leiomyoma (>50%) may calcify oesophageal fibrovascular polyp (~12.5%) may contain fat oesophageal duplication cyst (10...
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Body packing

Body packing refers to the internal concealment of drugs within the gastrointestinal tract or other orifices. People who do this may be called body packers, (drug) mules, stuffers, couriers or swallowers. Drugs may be concealed within condoms, foil, latex or cellophane.  Epidemiology There is ...
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Bulging duodenal papilla

Major duodenal papilla is a conic or cylindric protuberance at the medial aspect of the descending or horizontal duodenum at the site of the sphincter of Oddi. It is finding on small bowel follow-though (and endoscopy) and has a relatively long differential. On cross sectional imaging, the unde...
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CA 19-9 elevation

CA 19-9 is a serum antigen (monosialoganglioside) that has increased diagnostic use in the management of several malignancies, mainly of hepato-pancreatico-biliary origin. It is nonspecific, however, and can rise in both malignant and nonmalignant conditions. Elevation of serum CA 19-9 has been...
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Cantlie's line

Cantlie's line is a vertical plane that divides the liver into left and right lobes creating the principal plane used for hepatectomy. It extends from the inferior vena cava posteriorly to the middle of the gallbladder fossa anteriorly. It contains the middle hepatic vein which divides the live...
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Carcinoembryonic antigen

Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell-adhesive glycoprotein that was discovered in colorectal cancer in 1965, and is hence one of the oldest and most used tumour markers. Its name derives from its normal expression in fetoembryonic liver, gut and pancreas tissue. Normal range of CEA is...
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Christmas inspired signs

There are many signs in radiology that are related to Christmas: snowcap sign in avascular necrosis snowman sign in total anomalous pulmonary venous return in pituitary macroadenomas snowstorm appearance in complete hydatidiform and testicular microlithiasis holly leaf sign in calcified pl...
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Colonic stricture

Colonic strictures can be long (>10 cm) or short. Short scirrhous colorectal carcinoma (apple core sign) post surgical (anastamotic stricture) Long malignancy scirrhous colorectal carcinoma gastrointestinal lymphoma inflammatory bowel disease (IDB) ulcerative colitis Crohn disease pos...
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Complications following gastric banding

There are many complications that can occur following gastric banding. It is helpful to divide these into early and late post-surgical complications. Clinical presentation Although the exact mode of presentation can vary depending on the underlying complication common modes of presentation tha...
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Complications post optical colonoscopy

Complications post optical colonoscopy are most commonly assessed by CT if patients present with abdominal symptoms post colonoscopy. Complications include: bowel perforation (most common) pneumoperitoneum pneumoretroperitoneum pneumomediastinum pneumothorax lower gastrointestinal haemorrh...
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Cricopharyngeal bar

Cricopharyngeal bar refers to the radiographic appearance of a prominent cricopharyngeus muscle contour on barium swallow. Terminology The terms cricopharnygeal bar and cricopharyngeal muscle spasm/achalasia are often used synonymously but this is incorrect because studies have demonstrated th...
Article

CT peritoneography

CT peritoneography is an examination used to assess difficulties with peritoneal dialysis.  Indications Recurrent peritonitis with difficulty with fluid exchange abdominal wall or genital soft-tissue oedema, localized bulging of the abdomen, and poor ultrafiltration. Technique Before perform...
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Cystic (necrotic) lymph nodes

Cystic or necrotic appearing lymph nodes can be caused by a number of infectious, inflammatory or malignant conditions: Systemic squamous cell carcinoma metastases treated lymphoma leukemia plasmacytoid T-cell leukemia acute myeloid leukemia viral lymphadenitis herpes simplex lymphadenit...
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Cystic lesions of the pancreas (differential)

The differential for cystic lesions of the pancreas includes: unilocular pancreatic pseudocyst intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) serous cystadenoma uncommonly uni/macrolocular pancreatic cysts occur in association with  von Hippel Lindau syndrome autosomal dominant polycysti...
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Cystic retroperitoneal lesions

A cystic retroperitoneal lesion can carry a relatively broad differenital which includes: retroperitoneal cystic lymphangioma retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenoma retroperitoneal cystic teratoma retroperitoenal cystic mesothelioma pseudomyxoma retroperitonei with cystic change perianal muc...
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Diffuse colonic nodularity (differential)

Diffuse colonic nodularity on barium enema or CT colonography has a range of possible etiologies: lymphoid hyperplasia (tend to be small and discrete) lymphoma (tend to be larger nodules and confluent) urticaria (closely spaced polygonal lesions, history is often helpful) pseudomembranous co...
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Diffuse small bowel disease

Diffuse small bowel disease may be caused by a number of conditions may be generalised multisystem disorders or conditions that effect the bowel in a global fashion: sprue scleroderma Whipple's disease amyloidosis hypoproteinaemia giardiasis intramural haemorrhage radiation enteritis sm...
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Discrete colonic ulceration

Discrete colonic ulcerations are nonspecific findings, and can be due to: Crohn disease infective colitis Yersinia entercolitis shigellosis tuberculosis cytomegalovirus (CMV) amoebic colitis vasculitic colitis Behcet disease
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Double bubble sign (duodenum)

The double bubble sign is seen in infants and represents dilatation of the proximal duodenum and stomach. It is seen in both radiographs and ultrasound, and can be identified antenatally 2. Pathology Causes include 1,2: congenital obstruction duodenal web duodenal atresia duodenal stenosis...
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Dysphagia

Dysphagia refers to subjective awareness of difficulty or obstruction during swallowing. It is a relatively common and increasingly prevalent clinical problem.  Fluoroscopy is the mainstay of imaging assessment but manometry can help evaluate the esophageal motor pattern and lower esophageal sp...
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Enteritis

Enteritis refers to inflammation of the small bowel. When associated with inflammation of the stomach, the term gastroenteritis is used which is usually caused by infection. Pathology Aetiology infection infective enteritis eosinophilic enteritis ischaemia inflammatory bowel disease radi...
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Epigastric hernia

An epigastric hernia occurs ventrally through a defect in linea alba superior the umbilicus. It is also known as a fatty hernia of linea alba. Risk factors obesity  pregnancy Radiographic features Ultrasound Shows a midline defect which is usually small with or without herniation of omenta...
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Foregut duplication cyst

Foregut duplication cysts are type congenital duplication cyst. They are sometimes classified under broncho-pulmonary  foregut malformations. Entities that fall under forgut duplication cysts include: bronchogenic cysts neurenteric cysts other enteric cysts oesophageal duplication cysts li...
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Gasless abdomen

A specific cause of the gasless abdomen can usually be made when the patient's history is known. Common causes include: small bowel obstruction bowel ischaemia congenital atresia ascites pancreatitis large abdominal mass - due to displacement
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Gastric band

A gastric band is a surgically placed device, used to assist in weight loss. It is now the most popular form of bariatric surgery, largely replacing gastric bypass procedures 1. Performed laparoscopically, a silicone band device is placed around the stomach to reduce its volume. The band is adj...
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Gastric band erosion

Gastric band erosion or penetration is a potentially serious complication following laparoscopic gastric band surgery for obesity.  Epidemiology Gastric band erosion is a delayed complication observed in between 0.3-14% of patients 1-2. Clinical presentation Patients often present non-specif...
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Gastric band malposition

Gastric band malposition is an early complication from laparoscopic gastric band procedures which are performed for obesity. It can occur as in isolation or with other gastric band complications. As surgical experience of lap gastric banding has accumulated, it has become a relatively rare comp...
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Gastric diverticulum

Gastric diverticula are sac-like projections that usually originate from the gastric fundus, most commonly on the posterior surface. They are the least common gastrointestinal diverticulum.  Epidemiology Gastric diverticula are rare and commonly detected incidentally. The incidence varies from...
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Gastric emphysema

Gastric emphysema, referring to the presence of gas in the wall of the stomach is a relatively rare imaging finding 1. The stomach is the least common location for intramural gas in the gastrointestinal tract.  Differential diagnosis There is a wide range of causes, ranging from life-threateni...
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Gastric outlet obstruction

Gastric outlet obstruction is a syndrome resulting from mechanical obstruction of stomach emptying. Pathology Aetiology Gastric outlet obstruction can be due to malignant or benign causes. Malignant adenocarcinoma (second most common 4) GIST lymphoma (less commonly than other malignancies...
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Gastrinoma triangle

The gastrinoma triangle is an anatomical area in the abdomen, from where the majority (90%) of gastrinomas are thought to arise.  Gross anatomy Boundaries The triangle is formed by joining the following three points: superiorly: confluence of the cystic and common bile ducts   inferiorly: j...
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Giant colonic diverticulum

A giant colonic diverticulum is a rare form of presentation of colonic diverticulosis and is characterised by a large diverticular mass, usually filled with stool and gas, that communicates with the colonic lumen.   Clinical presentation The most common presentation is abdominal pain. Other pr...
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Granular mucosal pattern of the oesophagus (differential)

Granular mucosal pattern of the oesophagus represents very fine nodularity of the oesophageal mucosal surface. This finding is nonspecific and may represent: reflux oesophagitis (most common) Candida oesophagitis glycogenic acanthosis Barrett oesophagus superficial spreading oesophageal car...
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Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (abdominal complications)

Abdominal complications of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation can occur early (0-100 days) or late (>100 days) post transplant.  Complications Early bacterial infections, e.g. pseudomembranous colitis fungal infections, often affecting the oesophagus or as hepatic/splenic microabscesse...
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Haemoperitoneum

Haemoperitoneum is the presence of blood within the peritoneal cavity. Pathology Aetiology penetrating or non-penetrating abdominal trauma (often with associated organ injury) 1 ruptured ectopic pregnancy ovarian cyst rupture aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm rupture neoplasm rupture acute haem...
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Haustral markings

Haustral markings are the radiological appearance of the haustral folds within the colon. Disappearance of the haustral folds results in the lead pipe appearance of ulcerative colitis.
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HIV associated neoplasms

HIV-associated neoplasms are numerous and can be broadly divided into two groups: AIDS-defining malignancies associated but not AIDS defining malignancies AIDS-defining malignancies The development of these malignancies in HIV affected individuals generally implies progression to AIDS 4: Ka...
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HIV/AIDS: gastrointestinal manifestations

Gastrointestinal manifestations of AIDS are protean and can be broadly divided into opportunistic infections and tumours: Infections viral  cytomegalovirus (CMV) herpes simplex virus (HSV) primary infection with HIV fungal candidiasis histoplasmosis bacterial tuberculosis mycobacteriu...
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IgG4-related disease

IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic disease that is characterised by extensive IgG4-positive plasma cells and T-lymphocyte infiltration of various organs. Terminology This condition has been known by many other names in the past, such as IgG4-related sclerosing disease, IgG4-related s...
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Ingested bones

Ingested bones that become lodged in the throat or gastrointestinal tract are a common presentation to the emergency department. Recognition is important because these cases can be potentially fatal.  Pathology Patients may present with a 'foreign body' feeling in the throat after eating fish ...
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Ingested foreign bodies in children

Ingested foreign bodies in children are common as the world is a curious place to young children, who will put anything and everything into their mouth, and will often inadvertently swallow.  The usual practice is for plain films of the chest/abdomen to identify a foreign body. Epidemiology P...
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Internal hernia

Internal hernias are protrusions of the viscera through the peritoneum or mesentery but remaining within the abdominal cavity. Epidemiology Internal hernias have a low incidence of <1% and represent a relatively small amount of presentations, of ~5% 1. Clinical presentation The most common p...
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Internal hernias due to gastric bypass surgery

Internal hernias due to gastric bypass surgery are more common after laparoscopic gastric bypass than after an open procedure.  Clinical presentation It is a particularly sinister complication with variable, nonspecific clinical presentations. Most patients report a combination of postprandial...
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Intestinal failure

Intestinal failure is when a patient's native bowel is unable to digest and absorb  the food, electrolytes and fluids needed for normal growth and development.  Clinical presentation This often includes intractable diarrhoea, weight loss, dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and malnutrition. ...
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Intestinal nonrotation

Intestinal nonrotation is a congenital anomaly of the intestines that results in the small bowel occupying the right side of the peritoneal cavity and the colon predominantly on the left. It is sometimes thought of as a subtype of intestinal malrotation. Epidemiology Nonrotation is estimated ...
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Intestinal transplant

Intestinal transplantation is a surgical treatment for intestinal failure. It is one of the most rarely performed transplant procedures performed, exclusively involving the transplantation of donor small bowel to a recipient, with an ileostomy formation.  Due to the high risk of complications w...
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Intra-abdominal calcification (neonatal)

Intra-abdominal calcification in a neonate can be caused by a number of pathologies that cause calcification within the peritoneal space or within organs. Pathology Aetiology Meconium peritonitis The commonest cause is meconium peritonitis which is the result of aseptic peritonitis secondary...
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Ivor Lewis procedure

Ivor Lewis procedure (also known as a gastric pull-up) is a type of oesophagectomy, an upper gastrointestinal tract operation performed for mid and distal oesophageal pathology, usually oesophageal cancer. Due to the necessity of removing a significant length of the oesophagus, the stomach is "...
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Linitis plastica

Linitis plastica is a descriptive term usually referring to the appearance of the stomach, although the rectum can also be described this way (see: linitis plastica of the rectum). The appearance is said to be reminiscent of an old leather water-bottle. Pathology The underlying cause is usuall...
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Littre hernia

Littre hernia is a hernia containing a Meckel's diverticulum. Also known as a persistent omphalomesenteric duct hernia. It is most frequently encountered in the inguinal region. Radiographic features CT blind ending tubular structure arising from antimesentric border of small bowel and extend...
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Lower abdominal / pelvic calcification

Causes of calcifications in the lower abdomen and pelvis include: vascular calcifications artherosclerosis aneurysms phleboliths urogenital uterine fibroid prostatic calcification seminal vesicle and ductus deferens calcification bladder stones gallstones dropped stones following chol...
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Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (differential)

Lower gastrointestinal bleeding usually occurs distal to the ligament of Treitz. Clinical presentation Presents with melaena, haematochezia or, if subclinical slow bleeding, chronic anaemia. Causes diverticular disease enterocolitis infective Crohn’s disease ulcerative colitis ischaemic...
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Lumbar hernia

Lumbar hernias are a rare form of posterior abdominal hernia.  Epidemiology Most common in patients aged between 50 and 70 years with a male predominance 1.  Clinical presentation Patients with lumbar hernias can present with a variety of symptoms, including a posterolateral mass, back pain,...
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Malignant oesophageal neoplasms

Malignant oesophageal neoplasms are much more common than benign oesophageal neoplasms, especially if the patient is symptomatic.  Pathology oesophageal carcinoma (90%) oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) oesophageal spindle cell carcinoma oesophageal adenocarcinoma oesophageal neuro...
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Malignant vs benign gastric ulcer (barium)

Barium meal has been frequently used to differentiate malignant and benign gastric ulcers: Features suggesting benign gastric ulcer outpouching of ulcer crater beyond the gastric contour (exoluminal) smooth rounded and deep ulcer crater smooth ulcer mound smooth gastric folds that reach the...
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Maydl hernia

Maydl hernias are defined as the presence of two small bowel loops within a single hernial sac, that is, there are two efferent and two afferent loops of bowel, forming a "W" shape. This type of hernia is more prone to strangulation and necrosis. The intervening intra-abdominal loop is also at ...
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McBurney's point

McBurney's point is defined as a point that lies one-third of distance laterally on a line drawn from the umbilicus to the right anterior superior iliac spine. Classically, it corresponds to the location of the base of the appendix 1. Clinically, McBurney's point is relevant for the elicitation...
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Medical devices in the abdomen and pelvis

Medical devices in the abdomen and pelvis are important to be recognised, just like medical devices of the chest. Often we ignore these devices, considering them to be incidental and non-pathological, however it is essential to be aware of potential complications. Gastrointestinal tubes stomac...
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Mega oesophagus

Mega oesophagus or diffuse oesophageal dilatation can be caused by a variety of conditions.  Pathology Aetiology Some of the more common causes are given below 1-3: oesophageal dysmotility achalasia Chagas disease scleroderma distal obstruction malignant stricture, e.g. oesophageal canc...
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Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas

Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are the most common cystic neoplasm of the pancreas and include: mucinous cystadenoma of pancreas mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas intraductal papillary neoplasms (IPMN) of the pancreas: sometimes classified separately
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Neoplasms of the appendix

There are a number of neoplasms that can involve the appendix, some of which are peculiar to this site. Epidemiology Tumours involving the appendix have been found in only about 1% of all appendectomy 9. Epithelial neoplasms and neuroendocrine tumours represent the gross majority of the tumour...
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Nodular filling defects of duodenum (differential)

Nodular filling defects due to mucosal lesions in the duodenum are due to a number of processes. For a differential list which includes non-mucosal lesions see duodenal filling defects. The differential diagnosis for mucosal lesions includes:  heterotopic gastric mucosa 1-2 mm clustered onl...
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Non-neoplastic solid lesions of the pancreas

Non-neoplastic solid lesions of the pancreas (NNSLP) are conditions which may mimic pancreatic neoplasms on imaging. They include: focal pancreatitis fatty infiltration-replacement intrapancreatic accessory spleen congenital anomalies, such as prominent pancreatic lobulations and bifid pancr...
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Oesophageal dysmotility

Oesophageal dysmotility refers to the pathological disruption of the normal sequential and coordinated muscle motion of the oesophagus to transport food from the oropharynx to the stomach. It is an umbrella term used to refer to the common pathophysiological endpoint of dysmotility that can be c...
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Omental cake

Omental cake refers to infiltration of the omental fat by material of soft-tissue density. The appearances refer to the contiguous omental mass simulating the top of a cake. Masses on the peritoneal surfaces and malignant ascites may also be present.  Pathology The most common cause is metasta...
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Omphalomesenteric fistula

Omphalomesenteric fistula occurs as aresult of failure of obliteration of the omphalomeseneric duct. It is one of the congenital fistulas of gastrointestinal tract . Treatment of choice is often a partial trans umbilical resection with umbilical restitution. See also gut fistulation
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Pancreatic atrophy

Pancreatic atrophy is non-specific and is common in elderly patients, although in younger patients it can be a hallmark of pathology. Most commonly it is associated with aging, obesity and end-stage chronic pancreatitis.  It occurs principally with fatty replacement of the pancreas (pancreatic ...
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Pancreatic calcifications

Pancreatic calcifications can arise form many aetiologies. Punctate intraductal calcifications acute alcoholic pancreatitis (20-40%)  intraductal, numerous, small, irregular preponderant cause of diffuse pancreatic intraductal calcification chronic pancreatitis idiopathic: no underlying ca...
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Pancreatic neoplasms

There are numerous primary pancreatic neoplasms, in part due to the mixed endocrine and exocrine components. Classification Classification based on function exocrine: ~99% of all primary pancreatic neoplasms pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma ~90-95% cystic neoplasm intraductal papillary muc...
Article

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis refers to inflammation involving the pancreas.  It has various forms which can be classified in many many ways according to time of onset, aetiological agent or associated pathology. acute pancreatitis interstitial oedematous pancreatitis necrotising pancreatitis haemorrhagic p...
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Pantaloon hernia

A pantaloon hernia (dual hernia or Romberg's hernia or saddle bag hernia) is defined as ipsilateral, concurrent direct and indirect inguinal hernias. Hernial sacs are present on both sides of the inferior epigastric vessels, and separated by the posterior wall of the inguinal canal brought down ...
Article

Periampullary tumours

Periampullary tumours are those that arise within two cm of the ampulla of Vater in the duodenum. Tumours that fall under this group includes four main types of tumours 1,4 pancreatic head / uncinate process tumours: includes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma involving head and uncinate process...
Article

Peritoneal calcification

Peritoneal calcification is seen in a limited number of conditions that result in calcification of peritoneal structures. Therefore, the differential diagnosis is small: psammoma bodies in malignancy (most frequently cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary): fine sand like calcification pseudomyxoma p...
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PET-CT indications

PET-CT is a combination of cross-sectional anatomic information provided by CT and the metabolic information provided by positron emission tomography (PET). PET is most commonly performed with 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). F-18 is an unstable radioisotope and has a half-life of approx...
Article

Pneumatosis coli

Pneumatosis coli is a descriptive sign presenting radiographically as intramural gas limited to the colonic wall.  Terminology There are different terminologies in the medical literature, such as pneumatosis intestinalis, pneumatosis coli, and pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis. Pneumatosis in...
Article

Pneumoretroperitoneum

Pneumoretroperitoneum is by definition presence of gas within the retroperitoneal space. It is always abnormal and has a relatively small differential: perforated retroperitoneal hollow viscus duodenum peptic ulcer disease blunt or penetrating abdominal trauma endoscopy +/- biopsy (rare) 3...
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Portal venous gas

Portal venous gas is the accumulation of gas in the portal vein and its branches. It needs to be distinguished from pneumobilia, although this is usually not too problematic, when associated findings are taken into account along with the pattern of gas (i.e. peripheral in portal venous gas, cent...
Article

Primary peritoneal neoplasms

Primary peritoneal neoplasms comprise of an uncommon group of heterogenous entities. The list includes mesothelial derivatives primary (malignant) peritoneal mesothelioma primary perioneal multicystic mesothelioma primary peritoneal well differentiated papillary mesothelioma primary perito...
Article

Primary pneumatosis intestinalis

Primary pneumatosis intestinalis (PPI) is a benign idiopathic condition in which multiple gas-filled cystic lesions are seen in the gastrointestinal tract wall. The changes are usually seen initially on radiography or CT with CT being the more sensitive test. Epidemiology Primary pneumatosis i...
Article

Pseudopneumoperitoneum

Pseudopneumoperitoneum describes any gas within the abdominal cavity that masquerades as free intraperitoneal gas or pneumoperitoneum when it is in fact contained within an organ. Correctly identifying pneumoperitoneum is important, but making the diagnosis in error may lead to further unnecessa...
Article

RASopathies

RASopathies are a class of developmental disorders caused by germline mutations in genes that encode for components or regulators of the Ras/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Epidemiology As a group, RASopathies represent one of the most common malformation syndromes, with an in...

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