Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

1,784 results found
Article

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a catch-all term for all lymphomas that are not of the Hodgkin's subtype. It is a heterogeneous group of malignancies in terms of histology, clinical presentation and prognosis.  See the 2008 WHO classification for further information on subtypes. 
Article

CNS cryptococcosis

CNS cryptococcosis results from infection of the central nervous system with the yeast-like fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. It is the most common fungal infection and second most common opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. For a general discussion of infection with this organi...
Article

Subtalar dislocation

Subtalar dislocations is the simultaneous dislocation of the talonavicular and talocalcaneal joints, without tibiotalar or talar neck fractures 1, and comprises 1-2% of all dislocations, Pathology Mechanism Subtalar dislocations are often associated with high energy trauma, usually, motor veh...
Article

Prostatic carcinoma

Prostatic carcinoma ranks as the most common malignant tumour in men and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Prostatic adenocarcinoma is by far the most common histological type and is the primary focus of this article. Epidemiology It is primarily a disease of the el...
Article

Choledocholithiasis

Choledocholithiasis denotes the presence of gallstones within the bile ducts (common hepatic duct / common bile duct). Epidemiology Choledocholithiasis is relatively common, seen in in 6-12% of patients who undergo cholecystectomy 2. Clinical presentation Stones within the bile duct are ofte...
Article

Chronic sinusitis

Chronic sinusitis refers to ongoing long term sinus infection-inflammation that often develops secondary to a prolonged/refractory acute sinus infection. Epidemiology It most commonly affects young to middle-aged adults but can uncommonly affect children. Pathology Aetiology deviated nasal ...
Article

Cervical spine floating pillar

A floating pillar, also referred as pedicolaminar fracture-separation injury, is characterised by fractures through the pedicle and lamina of a cervical spine vertebrae creating a free-floating articular pillar fragment. It is an unstable cervical spine fracture that results from hyperflexion–la...
Article

Infectious colitis

Infectious colitis refers to inflammation of the colon due to an infective cause, including bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic infections. Epidemiology In Western countries, bacterial infection is the most common cause, while in developing countries parasitic infection is much more common....
Article

Necrotising enterocolitis

Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal condition in premature neonates. It is characterised by inflammation, ischaemia, and permeability of the neonatal bowel wall to bacteria. It is potentially life threatening with significant associated morbidity. Epidemiology N...
Article

Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is an idiopathic condition characterised by the alveoli filling with an inflammatory, eosinophil-rich infiltrate. Classically on imaging, it appears as chronic consolidation with upper zone and peripheral predominance. Epidemiology Most patients are middle ...
Article

Ectopic pregnancy

Ectopic pregnancy refers to the implantation of a fertilised ovum outside of the uterine cavity. Epidemiology The overall incidence has increased over the last few decades and is currently thought to affect 1-2% of pregnancies. The risk is as high as 18% for first trimester pregnancies with bl...
Article

Klatskin tumour

Klatskin tumour is a term that was traditionally given to a hilar cholangiocarcinoma, occurring at the bifurcation of the common hepatic duct. Typically, these tumours are small, poorly differentiated, exhibit aggressive biologic behaviour, and tend to obstruct the intrahepatic bile ducts. Epid...
Article

Hyper IgE syndrome

Hyperimmunoglobulin E (hyper IgE) syndrome (HIES), also known as Job syndrome, consists of heterogeneous group of complex hereditary combined B- and T-cell immune deficiency diseases characterised by recurrent Staph aureus chest infections, characteristic coarse facial appearance and dental prob...
Article

Tibial plateau fracture

Tibial plateau fractures were originally termed a bumper or fender fracture but only 25% of tibial plateau fractures result from impact with automobile bumpers. Pathology The most common mechanism of injury involves axial loading, e.g. fall from a significant height. In younger patients, the m...
Article

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), also known as Dawson disease, is a rare chronic, progressive and fatal encephalitis that affects primarily children and young adults, caused by a persistent infection of immune resistant measles virus. Epidemiology  1 in 100,000 people infected with ...
Article

Secondary synovial chondromatosis

Secondary synovial chondromatosis (SOC) is a disorder that results in intra-articular loose bodies as a result of trauma, osteoarthrosis, or neuropathic arthropathy. It is quite distinct to primary synovial chondromatosis. Pathologically concentric rings of growth may be seen. Radiographic feat...
Article

Hypoglycaemic encephalopathy

Hypoglycaemic encephalopathy is a brain injury that results from prolonged or severe hypoglycaemia.  On imaging, it can manifest on MRI as bilateral areas of increased signal on both T2 and FLAIR affecting the posterior limb of the internal capsule, cerebral cortex (in particular parieto-occipi...
Article

Ovarian torsion

Ovarian torsion, also sometimes termed adnexal torsion or tubo-ovarian torsion, refers to rotation of the ovary and portion of the fallopian tube on the supplying vascular pedicle.  It can be intermittent or sustained and results in venous, arterial and lymphatic stasis. It is a gynaecological ...
Article

Ischaemic stroke

Ischaemic stroke results from a sudden cessation of adequate amounts of blood reaching parts of the brain. Ischaemic strokes can be divided according to territory affected or mechanism. Epidemiology Stroke is the second most common cause of morbidity worldwide (after myocardial infarction) and...
Article

Lisfranc injury

Lisfranc injuries, also called Lisfranc fracture-dislocations, are the most common type of dislocation involving the foot and correspond to the dislocation of the articulation of the tarsus with the metatarsal bases. Pathology Anatomy The Lisfranc joint is the articulation of the tarsus with ...
Article

Intussusception

Intussusception occurs when one segment of bowel is pulled into itself or a neighbouring loop of bowel by peristalsis. It is also known as bowel telescoping into itself. It is an important cause of an acute abdomen in children and merits timely ultrasound examination and reduction to preclude s...
Article

Morton neuroma

Morton neuromas are focal areas of symptomatic perineural fibrosis around a plantar digital nerve of the foot. The abnormality is non-neoplastic and does not represent a true neuroma. It may more correctly be known as Morton metatarsalgia. The condition is thought to be due to chronic entrapment...
Article

Septic pulmonary emboli

Septic pulmonary emboli refers to the embolisation of infectious particles (intravascular thrombus containing microorganisms) into the lungs via the pulmonary arterial system.  Pathology Septic emboli can occur from varying sources which embolise 5: tricuspid valve endocarditis infection els...
Article

Pulmonary embolism

Pulmonary embolism (PE) refers to embolic occlusion of the pulmonary arterial system. The majority of cases result from thrombotic occlusion, and therefore the condition is frequently termed pulmonary thrombo-embolism which is what this article mainly covers. Other embolic sources include: air...
Article

Intracranial neuroentric cyst

Neurenteric cysts are developmental CNS lesions arising from endoderm.  Pathology They result from incomplete resorption of the neurenteric canal, a temporary connection between yolk sac and amnion during early embryogenesis. Intracranial neuroentric cysts are extra axial and in 80% of cases a...
Article

Wagstaffe-Le Forte fracture

A Wagstaffe-Le Forte fracture refers to an avulsion fracture of the medial aspect of the distal fibula due to avulsion of the anterior tibiofibular ligament attachment. See also lower extremity fractures
Article

Diffuse axonal injury

Diffuse axonal injury (DAI), also known as traumatic axonal injury (TAI), is a severe form of traumatic brain injury due to shearing forces. It is a potentially difficult diagnosis to make on imaging alone, especially on CT as the finding can be subtle, however, it has the potential to result in...
Article

Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is one of the non-small cell carcinomas of the lung, overtaken by adenocarcinoma of the lung as the most commonly encountered lung cancer.  Epidemiology Squamous cell carcinoma accounts for ~30-35% of all lung cancers and in most instances are due to heavy smoking...
Article

Osteosarcoma

Osteosarcomas are malignant bone forming tumours and the second most common primary bone tumour after multiple myeloma. They account for ~20% of all primary bone tumours and occur in primary and secondary forms, each with different epidemiology and distribution. Although plain radiography can pr...
Article

Malignant pleural disease

Malignant pleural disease usually heralds a poor prognosis, whether it represents a primary pleural malignancy or metastatic involvement.  Clinical presentation Clinical presentation is variable. Patients may be asymptomatic or have pleuritic pain. If associated with a sizeable pleural effusio...
Article

Multinodular and vacuolating neuronal tumours

Multinodular and vacuolating neuronal tumour (MVNT) is a newly recognized cytoarchitectural pattern in the recently revised 2016 edition of the WHO classification of CNS tumours. Radiologically, MVNTs appear as small 'bubbly' indolent subcortical tumours that sometimes present with seizures. Th...
Article

Osteochondral defect

Osteochondral defects are focal areas of articular damage with cartilage damage and injury of the adjacent subchondral bone. It is a term that encompasses osteochondritis dissecans and is used synonymously with osteochondral injury/defect in the paediatric population. The recognised sites of os...
Article

Transverse myelitis

Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is an inflammatory condition affecting both halves of the spinal cord and associated with rapidly progressive motor, sensory, and autonomic dysfunction. It is mostly imaged with MRI, which generally shows a long segment (3-4 segments or more) of T2 increased sign...
Article

Gallstones

Gallstones, also called cholelithiasis, are concretions that occur anywhere within the biliary system, most commonly within the gallbladder.  Terminology Gallstones (cholelithiasis) describes stone formation at any point along the biliary tree. Specific names can be given to gallstones dependi...
Article

Entero-enteric fistula

An entero-enteric fistula is one formed between two parts of the small bowel. The can result for a number of reasons most commonly with inflammatory bowel disease, in particular Crohn.
Article

Kienböck disease

Kienböck disease is the eponymous name given to avascular necrosis (aseptic necrosis) involving the lunate. It is often referred to as lunatomalacia.  Epidemiology The age distribution for Kienbock disease depends on gender. The condition is most common within the dominant wrist of young adult...
Article

Primary biliary cholangitis

Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease that is the cause of 1-2% of deaths from cirrhosis and constitutes the third most common indication for liver transplantation in adults. Terminology The name of this disease was changed from primary biliary ci...
Article

Primary uveal malignant melanoma

Malignant uveal melanomas, also referred as choroidal melanomas, are the most common primary tumour of the adult eye 3.  Epidemiology Malignant melanoma of the uvea is the most common primary intraocular malignancy and is predominantly seen in Caucasians 5. The incidence of these tumours incre...
Article

Laryngocoele

Laryngocoeles refer to dilatations of the laryngeal ventricular saccule located in paraglottic space of supraglottis. On imaging, these lesions are generally characterised as well-defined, thin-walled, fluid or air-filled cystic lesions in the paraglottic space. The communication with the laryn...
Article

Connatal cyst

Connatal cysts, also known as coarctation of the lateral ventricles or frontal horn cysts, are cystic areas adjacent to the superolateral margins of the body and frontal horns of the lateral ventricles and are believed to represent a normal variant. Epidemiology The incidence is 0.7% in low bi...
Article

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a malignancy arising from lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. Lymphoma can be restricted to the lymphatic system or can arise as extranodal disease. This, along with variable aggressiveness results in a diverse imaging appearance. Epidemiology Lymphoma accounts for ~4% of all cancers 4. T...
Article

Mallet finger

Mallet finger describes a type of injury where there is disruption of the extensor mechanism of the finger at the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP). It is the most prevalent finger tendon injury in sport. The term includes both bony avulsion injury and tendinous injury without avulsion.  Clini...
Article

Schistosomiasis (urinary tract manifestations)

Bladder schistosomiasis, also known as bilharzia of the bladder, is a major health problem in developing parts of the world predisposing individuals to squamous cell carcinoma. Epidemiology Schistosomiasis is very common, affecting over 200 million people, with the vast majority (85%) in Afric...
Article

Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of lung

Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) of the lung is a type of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is classified under the group of lung carcinomas of the salivary gland type. Epidemiology Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) is the most common of the SGTTLs 9. The tumour is thought to account for ~ 0.2...
Article

Central nervous system vasculitides

Central nervous system (CNS) vasculitides represent a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases affecting the walls of blood vessels in the brain, spinal cord, and the meninges. Please refer to the article on vasculitis for a general discussion of that entity.  The aim of this article will ...
Article

Spondylolysis

Spondylolysis is a defect in the pars interarticularis of the neural arch, the portion of the neural arch that connects the superior and inferior articular facets. It is commonly known as pars interarticularis defect or more simply as pars defect.  Epidemiology Spondylolysis is present in ~5% ...
Article

Bisphosphonate related proximal femoral fractures

Bisphosphonate-related proximal femoral fractures are an example of insufficiency fractures, although the direct causative link remains somewhat controversial 2. The atypical fracture pattern occurs in the proximal third of the femur, typically subtrochanteric, and may be unilateral or bilatera...
Article

Phenylketonuria

Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inborn error of metabolism resulting from abnormal metabolism of phenylalanine. If untreated, patients can develop central nervous system impairment.  Epidemiology PKU is inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder with an incidence of 1 in 10,000. It is more commo...
Article

Duverney fracture

Duverney fractures are a type of pelvic fracture most commonly occurring in the setting of a direct blow to the ilium, with a resultant isolated iliac wing fracture. It is regarded as a stable injury but may be operated on in the event of severe comminution.  History and etymology It is named ...
Article

Sacral insufficiency fractures

Sacral insufficiency fractures are stress fractures, which are the result of normal stresses on abnormal bone, most frequently seen in the setting of osteoporosis. They fall under the broader group of pelvic insufficiency fractures. Clinical presentation They are usually seen in elderly female...
Article

Metaphyseal corner fracture

Metaphyseal corner fractures, also known as classical metaphyseal lesions (CML) or bucket handle fractures, are observed in young children, less than 2 years old. It is considered pathognomic for non-accidental injury (NAI).  Prevalence This injury is not only the fracture most specific for NA...
Article

Proximal humeral fracture

Proximal humeral fractures are common upper extremity fractures, particularly in older patients, and can result in significant disability. Epidemiology Proximal humeral fractures represent around 5% of all fractures ?.  They are most common in older populations and especially in those who are ...
Article

Ectopia cordis

Ectopia cordis is an extremely rare congenital malformation where the heart is located partially or totally outside the thoracic cavity. The four main ectopic positions are:: adjacent to the thorax: ~60 % abdominal: 15-30% thoraco-abdominal: 7-18%  cervical: ~3% Epidemiology The estimated ...
Article

Segmental fracture

Segmental fracture is a fracture composed of at least two fracture lines that together isolate a segment of bone, usually a portion of the diaphysis of a long bone. This fracture pattern is frequently associated with high energy mechanism and devascularisation of the segmental fracture fragment(...
Article

Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis

Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OS-CS) is a clinically separate entity from osteopathia striata (Voorhoeve disease). Bony changes on their own are typically incidental and autosomal dominant, where OS-CS is a multi system, X-linked dominant disorder. Epidemiology OS-CS is extremely...
Article

Jaundice

Jaundice refers to a clinical sign of hyperbilirubinemia (>2.5 mg/dl) which has many causes. It is often a clue to a diagnosis. It can be largely divided into two types: non-obstructive, i.e. pre-hepatic and hepatic causes obstructive, i.e. post-hepatic causes Imaging has a major role in dete...
Article

Femoral hernia

Femoral hernias are a type of groin herniation and comprise of a protrusion of a peritoneal sac through the femoral ring into the femoral canal, posterior and inferior to the inguinal ligament. The sac may contain preperitoneal fat, omentum, small bowel, or other structures. Epidemiology There...
Article

Necrotising fasciitis

Necrotising fasciitis refers to a rapidly progressive and often fatal infection of soft-tissue fascia deep to the skin but superficial to the muscles. Epidemiology Necrotising fasciitis is relatively rare, although its prevalence is thought to be rising due an increase in the number of immunoc...
Article

Extrapleural haematoma

Extrapleural haematomas are uncommon and usually seen in the context of rib fracture, subclavian venous catheter traumatic insertion, and blunt chest injury. Pathology Extrapleural haematomas result from the accumulation of blood in the extrapleural space where the overlying extrapleural fat i...
Article

Pneumocephalus

Pneumocephalus refers to the presence of intracranial gas, and in the vast majority of cases the gas is air. Rarely a gas forming infection can result in pneumocephalus 4. The term encompasses air in any of the intracranial compartments, and is most commonly encountered following trauma or surge...
Article

Scrotal pyocoele

Scrotal pyocoeles are purulent fluid collections in the scrotal sac that generally occur in conjunction with epididymo-orchitis. Pathology Scrotal pyocoeles are typically a complication of epididymo-orchitis and testicular abscess but can also occur following trauma or surgery. The purulent fl...
Article

Thoracic aortic aneurysm

Thoracic aortic aneurysms are relatively uncommon compared to abdominal aortic aneurysms. There is a wide range of causes, and the ascending aorta is most commonly affected. CTA and MRA are the modalities of choice to image this condition. Terminology The term aneurysm is used when the axial d...
Article

Graft versus host disease (pulmonary manifestations)

Pulmonary graft versus host disease (GvHD) is one of the thoracic manifestations that can complicate haematopoetic stem cell transplantation. Pulmonary GvHD can be broadly divided into acute and chronic disease 1-4: acute pulmonary GvHD pulmonary involvement is rare the median time of onset o...
Article

Caplan syndrome

Caplan syndrome, also known as rheumatoid pneumoconiosis, is the combination of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and a characteristic pattern of fibrosis. Although first described in coal miners (coal workers' pneumoconiosis), it has subsequently been found in patients with a variety of pneumo...
Article

Coronary arterial ectasia

Coronary arterial ectasia (CAE) refers to diffuse dilatation of the coronary arteries. Under some classification systems there is some overlap with the term coronary arterial aneurysms (which is a more focal dilatation). Terminology It is often defined as dilatation of an arterial segment to a...
Article

Chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD), also known as chronic renal failure, is a progressive loss of glomerular function caused by a long-standing renal parenchymal disease. It is present when the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 for three consecutive months or greater than...
Article

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also historically known as pseudotumour cerebri, is a syndrome with signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure but where a causative mass or hydrocephalus is not identified. Terminology The older term benign intracranial hypertension is ge...
Article

Usual interstitial pneumonia

Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) is one of the morphological and pathological patterns of interstitial lung disease. On imaging, it usually presents with a patchy craniocaudal gradient of peripheral septal thickening, bronchiectasis, and honeycombing.  Terminology In the past, the term UIP ...
Article

Mycetoma

Mycetoma refers to a chronic and progressively destructive granulomatous disease. The defining clinical triad comprises: localised mass-like soft tissue injury with  draining sinuses, that  discharge grains of contagious material It is one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases defined by WHO...
Article

Paranasal sinuses retention cysts

Retention cysts of paranasal sinuses are benign lesions usually discovered incidentally on a plain sinus radiograph or cross-sectional imaging of the head. They do not usually cause symptoms.  Terminology They are also referred to as mucous retention cysts. Epidemiology It is difficult to es...
Article

Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms or tumours (IPMNs or IMPTs) are cystic tumours of the pancreas. Epidemiology These tumours are most frequently identified in older patients (50-60 years of age) 6. Main duct type (see below) appears to present a decade or so earlier on average than bran...
Article

Multilocular cystic renal tumours

Multilocular cystic renal tumours (MCRT) are rare benign renal neoplasms occurring in a bimodal age distribution, involving young children and adults in the 4th and 5th decades. For logical reasons, this article will discuss together the two ends of the spectrum of this disease, cystic partiall...
Article

Watershed cerebral infarction

Watershed cerebral infarctions, also known as border zone infarcts, occur at the border between cerebral vascular territories where the tissue is furthest from arterial supply and thus most vulnerable to reductions in perfusion.  Epidemiology Watershed cerebral infarction account for 5-10% of ...
Article

Osgood-Schlatter disease

Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD) is a chronic fatigue injury due to repeated microtrauma at the patellar ligament insertion onto the tibial tuberosity, usually affecting boys between 10-15 years. Epidemiology Osgood-Schlatter disease is seen in active adolescents, especially those who jump and k...
Article

Sarcoidosis (cardiac manifestations)

Cardiac manifestations of sarcoidosis are present in up to 25% of patients with sarcoidosis, but only 5-10% of patients are symptomatic 1-2. Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder characterised by the presence of non-caseating granulomas. For a general discussion of this condition please refer t...
Article

Nodular pulmonary amyloidosis

Nodular pulmonary amyloidosis is a subtype of pulmonary amyloidosis. It is considered a limited form of amyloidosis characterized by one or more intrapulmonary nodules or masses (amyloidomas). Clinical presentation Patients are usually asymptomatic. Some may rarely present with a cough or shor...
Article

Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis

Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a recently described rare, benign entity. About half of cases are felt to be idiopathic, with the other half secondary to underlying diseases or conditions (e.g. transplantation). Idiopathic cases belong to the group of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia...
Article

Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis

Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) is a benign lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by lymphocyte predominant infiltration of the lungs. It is classified as a subtype of interstitial lung disease. It also falls under the umbrella of non-lymphomatous pulmonary lymphoid disorders. E...
Article

Walled-off pancreatic necrosis

Walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) is a late complication of acute pancreatitis, although it can occur in chronic pancreatitis or as a result of pancreatic trauma. Differentiation of WOPN from pancreatic pseudocyst is essential because management differs. WOPN may need aggressive treatment to...
Article

Perthes disease

Perthes disease (also referred to as Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease) refers to idiopathic avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral epiphysis seen in children. It should not be confused with Perthes lesion of the shoulder. It is a diagnosis of exclusion and other causes of avascular necrosis (includi...
Article

Pancreatic pseudocyst

Pancreatic pseudocysts are common sequelae of acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis, and the most common cystic lesion of the pancreas. They are important both in terms of management and differentiation from other cystic processes or masses in this region. Terminology The following are th...
Article

Pulmonary leukostasis

Pulmonary leukostasis is a medical emergency that is most commonly seen as a complication of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in blast crisis, and acute myeloid leukemia when white blood cell (WBC) counts are over 100 x 109/L (100,000/microL). It needs to be considered in any patient with myeloge...
Article

Radial head dislocation

Radial head dislocation occurs when the radial head is displaced from its normal articulation with the ulna and the humerus. The dislocation may be acquired or congenital (see the separate article on congenital radial head dislocation). Additionally, radial head dislocation should be distinguis...
Article

Lung abscess

A lung abscess is a circumscribed collection of pus within the lung. They are often complicated to manage and difficult to treat and, in some cases, may be life threatening. Epidemiology As a result of the widespread availability of antibiotics, the incidence of lung abscesses has dramatically...
Article

Radial neck fracture

Radial neck fractures are, together with the radial head fractures, relatively common injuries, especially in adults, although they can be occult on radiographs.  Mechanism Radial neck fractures are almost always the result of a fall onto an outstretched hand. Force applied along the radius re...
Article

Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma

Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma is a distinct entity, recognised in the WHO classification of lymphoma. Epidemiology Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma accounts approximately 5% of large B-cell lymphoma, which is usually disseminated or found in the abdomen. There appears to b...
Article

Renal cell carcinoma

Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are primary malignant adenocarcinomas derived from the renal tubular epithelium and are the most common malignant renal tumour. They usually occur in 50-70-year-old patients and macroscopic haematuria occurs in 60% of the cases.  On imaging, they have a variety of ra...
Article

Renal cyst

Renal cysts are a common finding in the kidneys. Findings common to all "simple" renal cysts are well-marginated, thin walls with no enhancement of the cyst. They can be diagnosed on ultrasound, CT, or MRI. A cystic lesion in the kidney that deviates from the typical "simple" cyst appearance sho...
Article

Thymic carcinoma

Thymic carcinoma is part of the malignant end of thymic epithelial tumours. Epidemiology Patients are typically 50 to 70 years of age at presentation 9. Pathology The incidence of paraneoplastic syndromes is thought to be low. At least 10 different histologic variants have been described 4. ...
Article

Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation

Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation (BPOP) (also known as a Nora lesion) is a benign exophytic osteochondral lesion which has an appearance similar to an osteochondroma, and is typically seen in the hands and feet.  BPOPs are continuous with the underlying cortex, but usually wit...
Article

Gosselin fracture

The Gosselin fracture is a fracture of the distal tibia with a V-shaped fractured fragment and intra-articular involvement. History and etymology It is named after Leon Athanese Gosselin (1815–1887), a French surgeon.
Article

Bicuspid aortic valve

Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) refers to a spectrum of deformed aortic valves with two functional leaflets or cusps which are often unequal in size. They are most often congenital while an acquired bicuspid valve occurs when there is fibrous fusion between the right and left cusps of a pre-existin...
Article

Coronary microvascular obstruction

Microvascular obstruction (MVO), also known as no reflow phenomenon, is an established complication encountered in coronary angioplasty for prolonged acute myocardial infarction.  Pathology The phenomenon results from obstruction of the myocardial microcirculation, which is composed of vessel...

Updating… Please wait.
Loadinganimation

Alert accept

Error Unable to process the form. Check for errors and try again.

Alert accept Thank you for updating your details.