Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

1,747 results found
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Choroidal detachment

Choroidal detachment is a detachment of the choroid from the underlying sclera due to the accumulation of fluid in the suprachoroidal space generally due to increased intraocular pressure (IOP), as observed in some settings: choroidal effusion transudative: trauma exudative: fluid accumulatin...
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Choroidal epithelial cells

Choroidal epithelial cells are one of the three types of ependymal cells, themselves a type of glial cell. They cover the surface of the choroid plexus 1. 
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Choroid plexus carcinoma

Choroid plexus carcinomas are malignant neoplasms arising from the choroid plexus. They are classified as a WHO grade III tumour and while there is considerable overlap in imaging characteristics it carries significantly poorer prognosis than both WHO grade II atypical choroid plexus papilloma, ...
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Choroid plexus cyst (antenatal)

Antenatal choroid plexus cysts are benign and are often transient typically resulting in utero from an infolding of the neuroepithelium.   They should not be confused with adult choroid plexus cysts (which are very commonly found at autopsy and likely degenerative), large intraventricular simpl...
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Choroid plexus hyperplasia

Choroid plexus hyperplasia (CPH), also known as villous hypertrophy of the choroid plexus, is a rare benign condition that is characterised by bilateral enlargement of the entire choroid plexus in lateral ventricles without any discrete masses. This can result in overproduction of CSF and commun...
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Choroid plexus metastases

Metastases to the choroid plexus from extracranial tumours are rare, but nonetheless should be included in the differential diagnosis of an intraventricular mass. They are most commonly found within the lateral ventricles, presumably because a large proportion of the choroid plexus is located th...
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Choroid plexus papilloma

Choroid plexus papillomas are an uncommon, benign (WHO grade I) neuroepithelial intraventricular tumour which can occur in both the paediatric (more common) and adult population.  On imaging, these tumours are usually identified in the fourth ventricle in adults and in the lateral ventricles in...
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Choroid plexus xanthogranuloma

Choroid plexus xanthogranulomas are common, incidental and almost invariably asymptomatic lesions. It is unclear in much of the literature whether they represent a distinct entity from adult choroid plexus cysts, but they share imaging characteristics and are only likely to be distinguishable on...
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Chromogranin A

Chromogranin A (CgA) is an acidic secretory glycoprotein found in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells and neurones, as is a member of the granin family of proteins. It can be used both for immunohistochemical stains and as a serum marker 4.  Immunohistochemistry Chromogranin A is us...
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Chronic bronchitis

Chronic bronchitis (CB) is often defined as the presence of productive cough for three months in two successive years in a patient in whom other causes of chronic cough, such as tuberculosis, lung cancer and heart failure, have been excluded. It can be an important pathological component of chro...
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Chronic cholecystitis

Chronic cholecystitis refers to prolonged inflammatory condition that affects the gallbladder. It is almost always seen in the setting of cholelithiasis (95%), caused by intermittent obstruction of the cystic duct or infundibulum or dysmotility. Clinical presentation Patients may have a histor...
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Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is an idiopathic condition characterised by the alveoli filling with an inflammatory, eosinophil-rich infiltrate. Classically on imaging, it appears as chronic consolidation with upper zone and peripheral predominance. Epidemiology Most patients are middle ...
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Chronic hip subluxation

Chronic hip subluxation most common occurs in paediatric patients with neuromuscular disorders (e.g. cerebral palsy). It is considered a form of developmental hip dysplasia.  Epidemiology Chronic hip subluxation occurs in ~45% of cerebral palsy patients who are not walking by 5 years of age 3....
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Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired demyelinating disease involving peripheral nerves, and is generally considered the chronic counterpart to Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS).  Clinical presentation Patients typically present with a gradual and protracted (> 2 ...
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Chronic invasive fungal sinusitis

Chronic invasive fungal sinusitis (CIFS) is a form of invasive fungal sinusitis.  Clinical presentation The condition has a more prolonged course than acute invasive fungal sinusitis, usually more than 12 weeks 5. Patients are usually immunocompetent or have a milder level of immunocompromise....
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Chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD), also known as chronic renal failure, is a progressive loss of glomerular function caused by a long-standing renal parenchymal disease. It is present when the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 for three consecutive months or greater than...
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Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS)

Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is an uncommon and only recently described disorder characterised by infiltration of the brain by inflammatory cells. It has a predilection for the pons, with fairly characteristic curvilinea...
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Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a haematological malignancy.  Epidemiology CLL is considered the most common type of leukemia in the Western hemisphere; its prevalence in Europe and North America ranges from 29-38% of all leukaemias 1. It primarily affects adults ~65-70 years of age 3. ...
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Chronic mesenteric ischaemia

Chronic mesenteric ischaemia is an uncommon type of intestinal ischaemia usually affecting elderly patients as a result of significant stenosis of two or more mesenteric arteries. Epidemiology Normally seen in patients older than 60 years of age and is three times more common in women. Clinic...
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Chronic otomastoiditis with ossicular erosions

Chronic otomastoiditis with ossicular erosions (aka) non cholesteatomatous ossicular erosion or post inflammatory ossicular erosions is defined by the erosive changes involving the ossicles in the absence of cholesteatoma in patient with history of chronic otomastoiditis. Radiographic features ...
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Chronic otomastoiditis with tympanosclerosis

Chronic otomastoiditis with tympanosclerosis represents calcific or bony middle ear foci secondary to suppurative chronic otomastoiditis. Radiographic features Common locations of calcifications include: tympanic membrane ossicle surface stapes footplate muscle tendons ossicle ligaments ...
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Chronic pancreatitis

Chronic pancreatitis represents the end result of a continuous, prolonged, inflammatory and fibrosing process that affects the pancreas. This results in irreversible morphologic changes and permanent endocrine and exocrine pancreatic dysfunction. Epidemiology The most common cause of chronic p...
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Chronic periaortitis

Chronic periaortitis is an inflammatory condition which typically involves the infrarenal portion of the abdominal aorta. It is a rare disease usually occuring in middle-aged men. It has various clinical presentations: idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF) perianeurysmal retroperitoneal f...
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Chronic pulmonary embolism

Chronic pulmonary emboli are mainly a consequence of incomplete resolution of pulmonary thromboembolism. Radiographic features CTPA vascular CT signs include direct pulmonary artery signs complete obstruction partial obstruction eccentric thrombus calcified thrombus - calcific pulmonary ...
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Chronic pyelonephritis

Chronic pyelonephritis is form of pyelonephritis where there are longstanding sequelae of renal infection. At the time of writing there is still no definitive consensus at to whether the condition represents an active chronic infection, arises from multiple recurrent infections, or represents st...
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Chronic sinusitis

Chronic sinusitis refers to ongoing long term sinus infection-inflammation that often develops secondary to a prolonged/refractory acute sinus infection. Epidemiology It most commonly affects young to middle-aged adults but can uncommonly affect children. Pathology Aetiology deviated nasal ...
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Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH)

Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a distinct subgroup of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Five groups of PH can be differentiated 1. PH is defined as an increase of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) ≥25 mmHg at rest.CTEPH is characterised by organised tissue and the pres...
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Chronic traumatic encephalopathy

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy that is thought to result from mild repetitive head trauma.  Epidemiology The exact incidence and prevalence is unknown. It is most commonly seen in amateur and professional sports players where head contact is common (e.g...
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Circumferential resection margin

The circumferential resection margin (CRM) is a term used in rectal carcinoma excision surgery (such as total mesorectal excision (TME). Pathologic evaluation of the resection margin on the excised rectum has been considered important for determining the risk of local recurrence. A margin of ≤1...
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Cirsoid aneurysm

Cirsoid aneurysms are rare arteriovenous malformations of the scalp and extremities.  Clinical presentation Patients often present with a slow-growing pulsatile mass and may also experience bleeding, tinnitus and/or a headache 3.  Pathology Cirsoid aneurysms develop due to an abnormal arteri...
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Clasp-knife deformity

Clasp-knife deformity is relatively common congenital anomaly found at the lumbosacral junction.   Clinical presentation Clasp-knife syndrome, is one of many causes of low back pain. It occurs when a clasp-knife deformity is accompanied by pain on extension secondary to protrusion of the enlar...
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Clear cell meningioma

Clear cell meningiomas are a histological variant of meningioma with poorer prognosis and a higher rate of recurrence. They are therefore considered WHO grade 2 tumours, regardless of mitotic index, cellular atypia/anaplasia, or presence of brain invasion.  Epidemiology Clear cell meningiomas ...
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Clear cell sarcoma of the kidney

Clear cell sarcomas (CCS) of the kidney are a rare mesenchymal renal tumour that accounts for ~5% of primary renal neoplasms in paediatric population 1.  Epidemiology CCS is the second most common primary malignant renal neoplasm after Wilms tumour, with an annual incidence of 20 cases in the ...
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Clear cell tumour of the lung

Clear cell tumour of the lung is a rare benign pulmonary neoplasm that contains an abundant amount of glycogen. It is often classified under the spectrum of perivascular epithelioid cell tumours (PEComas). Radiographic features Usually seen as a rounded, smooth-walled, and peripheral parenchym...
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Clinically unclassifiable parkinsonism

Clinically unclassifiable parkinsonism (CUP) is a term applied to patients who have some parkinsonism features, but who do not fulfil clinical criteria for a particular disorder such as:  Parkinson disease  progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP)  multiple system atrophy (MSA-P)   corticobasal ...
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Clonorchiasis

Clonorchiasis is a trematodiasis caused by chronic infestation by Clonorchis sinensis, and can lead to recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, biliary strictures and cholangiocarcinoma.  Epidemiology Infection with Clonorchis sinensis occurs in endemic areas, mainly east China. Over 85 million people ...
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Clostridium difficile colitis

Clostridium difficile colitis, also known as pseudomembranous colitis, is a common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, and increasingly encountered in sick hospitalised patients. If undiagnosed and untreated, it continues to have high mortality. It may be classified as a form of infectious...
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CNS capillary telangiectasia

CNS capillary telangiectasiae(s) are small, asymptomatic low flow vascular lesions of the brain.  Epidemiology As these lesions are asymptomatic, diagnosis usually matches the age of first imaging with MRI, and as such are most frequently found in middle-aged and elderly adults. Their incidenc...
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Coal workers' pneumoconiosis

Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) is an occupational disease (type of pneumoconiosis) caused by exposure to coal dust free of silica (washed coal). Histologically, CWP is classified according to disease severity into simple (presence of coal macules) and complicated (with progressive massive fi...
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CoA synthase protein associated neurodegeneration

CoA synthase protein associated neurodegeneration (CoPAN) is a type of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). Clinical presentation Patients typically present with a variety of symptoms including spastic-dystonic paraparesis, Parkinsonism, cognitive impairment, obsessive-compul...
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Coccidioidomycosis

Coccidioidomycosis refers to an infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Coccidioides spp, usually localised to the lungs. This disease is not to be confused with the similarly named paracoccidioidomycosis. Epidemiology The most common forms of Coccidioides spp are Coccidioides immitis and Coc...
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Cochlear aplasia

Cochlear aplasia, or complete absence of the cochlea is a rare anomaly which accounts for only 3% of cochlear malformations.1 Radiographic features complete absence of the cochlea. Dense otic bone is seen at the anatomical site of the cochlea 2 cochlear nerve canal and cochlear nerve are abse...
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Cochlear hypoplasia

Cochlear hypoplasia is defined by small underdeveloped cochlea <2 turns. Radiographic features a small cochlear bud of variable length (usually 1–3 mm).  It has only one turn or a partial turn is seen cochlear nerve often hypoplastic or absent cochlear nerve canal: absent, narrow or normal ...
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Cochlear incomplete partition type I

Cochlear incomplete partition type I  (IP-I) is a type of cochlear anomaly associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Radiographic features CT The main findings on CT are: absent modiolus absent interscalar septum wide (most common) or normal cochlear nerve canal Absence of these structu...
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Cochlear incomplete partition type III

Cochlear incomplete partition type III (IP-III), also termed X-linked deafness, is a rare type of genetic cochlear anomaly associated with mixed conductive and sensorineural hearing loss.  Pathology It is caused a mutation in the POU3F4 gene located on the X chromosome. Clinical presentation ...
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Collision tumour of the ovary

A collision tumour of the ovary is an uncommon ovarian neoplasm where there is co-existence of two adjacent but histologically distinct tumours with no histologic admixture at the interface. Pathology The exact pathogenesis is not well known. They are most commonly composed of ovarian teratoma...
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Colloid nodule (thyroid)

Colloid nodules are non-neoplastic benign nodules occurring within the thyroid gland. They form the vast majority of nodular thyroid disease. Pathology Colloid nodules are composed of irregularly enlarged follicles containing abundant colloid. Some colloid nodules can be cystic (cystic colloid...
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Colon polyp

Colon polyps are mucosal outgrowths of the colon wall. They are of interest to physicians and radiologists because of the accepted progression of adenomatous polyps to colon carcinoma. Pathology adenomatous colon polyps tubular polyps tubulovillous polyps villous colon polyps dysplastic co...
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Colovaginal fistula

Colovaginal fistula is one form of genitourinary fistula. It is also sometimes classed under a type of gastro-intestinal fistula. Pathology It refers to a communication between the colon (practically the rectum or sigmoid colon) with the vagina. At times, specific terms are used dependent on ...
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Colovesical fistula

Colovesical fistulas are communications between the lumen of the colon and that of the bladder, either directly or via an intervening abscess cavity (foyer intermediaire). When the communication is between the rectum and urinary bladder, the term rectovesical fistula is used. Epidemiology The ...
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Columnar alteration with prominent apical snouts and secretions

Columnar alteration with prominent apical snouts and secretions (CAPSS) is a pathological entity encountered when breast biopsies are done for investigation of punctate or amorphous calcifications. CAPSS involves the terminal ductal and lobular units (TDLU's). It is sometimes classified under t...
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Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema

Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are a possible new addition to a growing list of smoking-related lung disease characterised by the coexistence of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) or nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with emphysema in smokers. Epidemiology It typicall...
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Comedo type ductal carcinoma in situ

A comedo-type ductal carcinoma in situ, also known as comedocarcinoma in situ is the high grade subtype of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).  It completely fills and dilates the ducts and lobules in TDLU with plugs of high grade tumour cells with central necrosis "comedonecrosis".  It is the mos...
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Common cavity malformation

Common cavity malformation is defined by the absence of the normal differentiation between the cochlea and vestibule replaced by cystic structure. It accounts for about 25% of cochlear malformations 1.  Radiographic features confluence of the cochlea, vestibule and horizontal SCC in a cystic c...
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Common variable immunodeficiency

Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a condition that is associated with an impaired immune system. It is considered the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency, and is characterised by recurrent respiratory tract infections. Clinical presentation The commonest presentation is t...
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Common variable immunodeficiency (pulmonary manifestations)

Pulmonary manifestations of common variable immunodeficiency can be variable. The respiratory system is one of the most commenly affected systems in common variable immunodeficiency.  Radiographic disease spectrum CT chest bronchiectasis with interstitial lung disease could either be due to ...
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Complete hydatidiform mole with coexistant fetus

Complete hydatidiform mole with coexistant fetus (CHMCF) is an extremely rare entity where as the name suggests there is a twin pregnancy with a complete hydatidiform mole and a normal fetus.  Epidemiology It is seen extremely rarely, with an estimated incidence of one in 22,000–100,000 pregna...
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Complete tracheal rings

Complete tracheal rings are a rare, isolated tracheal or tracheobronchial anomaly resulting from abnormal cartilage growth, forming a complete ring and often causing airway stenosis. Clinical presentation Clinically, it manifests as respiratory distress in infants or mild symptomatic airway co...
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Complex fibroadenoma

Complex fibroadenoma is a sub type of fibroadenoma harbouring one or more of the following features: epithelial calcifications papillary apocrine metaplasia sclerosing adenosis and  cysts larger than 3 mm Epidemiology Complex fibroadenomas tend to occur in older patients (median age, 47 ye...
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Complex meniscal tear

Complex meniscal tears extend in more than one plane, and can in turn create separate flaps of meniscus.  Radiographic features MRI knee The mensical tear usually includes a combination of radial, horizontal, and longitudinal components (any two or all three). Often the meniscus substance app...
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Complicated breast cyst

Complicated breast cysts are one of the cystic breast lesions that show intracystic debris which may imitate a solid mass appearance. They should be carefully differentiated from a complex cyst and may require alternative management 3. Radiographic features Ultrasound thin wall with or withou...
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Congenital cataract

Congenital cataracts are a major cause of blindness with early detection the most important factor in reducing impact on future vision.  Epidemiology Incidence is ~3 per 100,000 in the United Kingdom 1. Will be higher in areas with increased rates of congenital infection 5. Risk factors low ...
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Congenital insensitivity to pain

Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) refers to group of rare hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANs) characterised by an inability to feel pain 1. Terminology Although not clearly defined in the literature, CIP is not one specific diagnosis, but describes symptoms common to man...
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Congenital lobar overinflation

Congenital lobar overinflation (CLO), previously called congenital lobar emphysema, is a congenital lung abnormality that results in progressive overinflation of one or more lobes of a neonate's lung.  On imaging, it classically presents on chest radiographs as a hyperlucent lung segment with o...
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Congenital lumbar spinal stenosis

Congenital lumbar spinal stenosis (CLSS) is a type of vertebral central canal stenosis and has a different epidemiology with less severe degenerative change compared to acquired/degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.  Epidemiology CLSS tends to affect patients at a younger age (30-50 years old) ...
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Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries

Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, also known as levo- or L-loop transposition (L-TGA), is a rare cardiovascular anomaly with inversion of the ventricles and great arteries. Epidemiology This anomaly comprises less than 1% of all congenital heart diseases 1,2,7.  Clin...
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Congenital muscular dystrophies (central nervous system manifestations)

Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive myopathies presenting at birth with hypotonia, delayed motor development, and early onset of progressive muscle weakness, confirmed with a dystrophic pattern on muscle biopsy.  Clinical presentation There is...
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Congenital portosystemic shunt

​Congenital portosystemic shunts are rare anatomical abnormalities linked to abnormal embryological venous development. They can be extrahepatic or intrahepatic. In either case, the underlying abnormality is shunting of blood from the portal venous system to the systemic venous system thus avoid...
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Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the clavicle

Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the clavicle is a rare condition, which typically presents as an isolated anatomical variant.  Clinical presentation Usually presents as a midclavicular swelling in the neonate or young child 1.  Pathology Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the clavicle is more commo...
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Congenital radial head dislocation

Congenital radial head dislocation is the most common congenital elbow abnormality. It can occur in isolation, or more commonly may be associated with other conditions or syndromes. Epidemiology Overall, congenital radial head dislocation is rare 2. Clinical presentation Congenital radial he...
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Congenital talipes equinovarus

Congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) is considered the most common anomaly affecting the feet diagnosed on antenatal ultrasound. Terminology While some use CTEV and club foot (CF) synonymously, in certain publications term clubfoot is considered a more general descriptive term that describes ...
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Congenital tracheo-oesophageal fistula

Congenital tracheo-oesophageal fistula is a congenital pathological communication between the trachea and oesophagus.   Epidemiology Tracheo-oesophageal fistula and oesophageal atresia have a combined incidence of approximately 1 in 3500 live births 1-3,5. There is only a minimal hereditary/ge...
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Congenital urachal anomalies

Congenital urachal anomalies are a spectrum of potential anomalies that can occur due to incomplete involution of the urachus. Epidemiology A urachal remnant occurs in approximately 1 in 5000 patients. Pathology The urachus connects the dome of the bladder to the umbilical cord during fetal ...
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Connatal cyst

Connatal cysts, also known as coarctation of the lateral ventricles or frontal horn cysts, are cystic areas adjacent to the superolateral margins of the body and frontal horns of the lateral ventricles and are believed to represent a normal variant. Epidemiology The incidence is 0.7% in low bi...
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Constrictive pericarditis

Constrictive pericarditis (or perhaps better termed pericardial constriction) is a type of pericarditis which leads to diastolic dysfunction and potentially symptoms of right heart failure.  Epidemiology No single demographic is affected as there are numerous causes of constrictive pericarditi...
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Conus medullaris syndrome

Conus medullaris syndrome is caused by an injury or insult to the conus medullaris and lumbar nerve roots. It is a clinical subset of spinal cord injury syndromes. Injuries at the level of T12 to L2 vertebrae are most likely to result in conus medullaris syndrome. Pathology The conus medullari...
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Coraco-clavicular ligament injury

Coracoclavicular (CC) ligament injury is common with shoulder trauma. It is considered part of the spectrum of acromioclavicular joint injuries 2 and is not often an isolated injury. It is also often injured with clavicular fractures.  This injury is easy to miss, especially with presence of an...
Article

Coral reef aorta

Coral reef aorta (CRA) is a rare disease, described as hard calcifications involving the arterial wall which protrude into the lumen. It predominantly involves the posterior thoracic and abdominal aorta. CRA luminal lesions can cause significant aortic stenosis. Epidemiology Patients usually p...
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Cornual ectopic pregnancy

Cornual ectopic pregnancies are rare and represent a gestational sac within the cornua of a bicornuate or septate uterus.  Terminology Although sometimes interchangeably used with interstitial pregnancy, cornual pregnancy specifically refers to the presence of a gestational sac within a rudime...
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Coronary arterial ectasia

Coronary arterial ectasia (CAE) refers to diffuse dilatation of the coronary arteries. Under some classification systems there is some overlap with the term coronary arterial aneurysms (which is a more focal dilatation). Terminology It is often defined as dilatation of an arterial segment to a...
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Coronary artery aneurysm

Coronary artery aneurysms (CAA's) are an uncommon, predominantly incidental finding. Epidemiology CAA is most common in men 3, likely reflecting the increased rates of atherosclerosis in men compared to women. Prevalence varies in the literature between 0.1-5% 4. Clinical presentation Most c...
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Coronary artery disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality globally.  Clinical presentation CAD is asymptomatic in most of the population. When severe enough it can cause angina, or an acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction. CAD may also present with heart failure or sudd...
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Coronary microvascular obstruction

Microvascular obstruction (MVO), also known as no reflow phenomenon, is an established complication encountered in coronary angioplasty for prolonged acute myocardial infarction.  Pathology The phenomenon results from obstruction of the myocardial microcirculation, which is composed of vessel...
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Cor pulmonale

Cor pulmonale is defined as an failure of the structure and function of the right ventricle in the absence of left ventricular dysfunction. It is caused by an underlying primary disorder of the respiratory system. It has a generally chronic and slowly progressive course, although acute onset or ...
Article

Corpus callosum impingement syndrome

Corpus callosum impingement syndrome (CCIS) is caused by impingement of the corpus callosal fibers against inferior free margin of the falx cerebri due to longstanding and severe hydrocephalus and stretching of the lateral ventricles. this results in ischaemia and eventually atrophy of the neura...
Article

Corpus luteal cyst

Corpus luteal (CL) cysts are a type of functional ovarian cyst that results when a corpus luteum fails to regress following the release of an ovum. When associated with pregnancy, it is the most common pelvic mass encountered within the 1st trimester. There is also some overlap with the term "ha...
Article

Cortical desmoid

Cortical desmoids, also known as cortical avulsive injuries or the Bufkin lesion, are a benign self-limiting entity. This is a classic "do not touch" lesion, and should not be confused with an aggressive cortical/periosteal process (e.g. osteosarcoma).  Terminology Cortical desmoid is a misnom...
Article

Cortical laminar necrosis

Cortical laminar necrosis, also known as pseudolaminar necrosis, is necrosis of neurons in the cortex of the brain in situations when supply of oxygen and glucose is inadequate to meet regional demands. This is often encountered in cardiac arrest, global hypoxia and hypoglycaemia.  Terminology ...
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Cortical vein thrombosis

Cortical vein thrombosis, also known as superficial cerebral vein thrombosis, is a subset of cerebral venous thrombosis involving the superficial cerebral veins besides the dural sinus, often coexisting with deep cerebral vein thrombosis or dural venous sinus thrombosis. It has different clinica...
Article

Cowdry bodies

Cowdry bodies are neuronal intranuclear inclusions seen in Herpes simplex virus infections.
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Crack lung

Crack lung is a term used to describe one of the respiratory complications of smoked crack cocaine. Clinical presentation Patients present with sympathetic hyperactivity such as tachycardia, hypertension, dilated pupils, and chest pain, productive cough, dyspnoea, and hypoxaemia along with fev...
Article

Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia

Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia is one of four types of fibrous dysplasia and is characterised, as the name suggests, by involvement of the skull and facial bones. For a general discussion of the underlying pathology, refer to the parent article fibrous dysplasia. Terminology Although the term...
Article

Craniosynostosis

Craniosynostosis refers to premature closure of the cranial sutures. The skull shape then undergoes characteristic changes depending on which suture(s) close early. Epidemiology There is a 3:1 male predominance. Pathology Primary forms are either sporadic or familial. Secondary craniosynosto...

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