Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

1,793 results found
Article

Congenital tracheo-oesophageal fistula

Congenital tracheo-oesophageal fistula is a congenital pathological communication between the trachea and oesophagus.   Epidemiology Tracheo-oesophageal fistula and oesophageal atresia have a combined incidence of approximately 1 in 3500 live births 1-3,5. There is only a minimal hereditary/ge...
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Congenital urachal anomalies

Congenital urachal anomalies are a spectrum of potential anomalies that can occur due to incomplete involution of the urachus. Epidemiology A urachal remnant occurs in approximately 1 in 5000 patients. Pathology The urachus connects the dome of the bladder to the umbilical cord during fetal ...
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Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries

Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, also known as levo- or L-loop transposition (L-TGA), is a rare cardiovascular anomaly with inversion of the ventricles and great arteries. Epidemiology This anomaly comprises less than 1% of all congenital heart diseases 1,2,7.  Clin...
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Connatal cyst

Connatal cysts, also known as coarctation of the lateral ventricles or frontal horn cysts, are cystic areas adjacent to the superolateral margins of the body and frontal horns of the lateral ventricles and are believed to represent a normal variant. Epidemiology Incidence of 0.7% in low birth ...
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Constrictive pericarditis

Constrictive pericarditis (or perhaps better termed pericardial constriction) is a type of pericarditis which leads to diastolic dysfunction and potentially symptoms of right heart failure.  Epidemiology No single demographic is affected as there are numerous causes of constrictive pericarditi...
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Conus medullaris syndrome

Conus medullaris syndrome is caused by an injury or insult to the conus medullaris and lumbar nerve roots. It is a clinical subset of spinal cord injury syndromes. Injuries at the level of T12 to L2 vertebrae are most likely to result in conus medullaris syndrome. Pathology The conus medullari...
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Cor pulmonale

Cor pulmonale is defined as an failure of the structure and function of the right ventricle in the absence of left ventricular dysfunction. It is caused by an underlying primary disorder of the respiratory system. It has a generally chronic and slowly progressive course, although acute onset or ...
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Coraco-clavicular ligament injury

Coracoclavicular (CC) ligament injury is common with shoulder trauma. It is considered part of the spectrum of acromioclavicular joint injuries 2 and is not often an isolated injury. It is also often injured with clavicular fractures.  This injury is easy to miss, especially with presence of an...
Article

Coral reef aorta

Coral reef aorta (CRA) is a rare disease, described as rock-hard calcifications involving the arterial wall which protrude into the lumen. It predominantly involves the posterior thoracic and abdominal aorta. CRA luminal lesions can cause significant aortic stenosis. Epidemiology Patients usua...
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Cornual ectopic pregnancy

Cornual ectopic pregnancies are rare and represent a gestational sac within the cornua of a bicornuate or septate uterus.  Terminology Although sometimes interchangeably used with interstitial pregnancy, cornual pregnancy specifically refers to the presence of a gestational sac within a rudime...
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Coronary arterial ectasia

Coronary arterial ectasia (CAE) refers to diffuse dilatation of the coronary arteries. Under some classification systems there is some overlap with the term coronary arterial aneurysms (which is a more focal dilatation). Terminology It is often defined as dilatation of an arterial segment to a...
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Coronary artery aneurysm

Coronary artery aneurysms (CAA's) are an uncommon, predominantly incidental finding. Epidemiology CAA is most common in men 3, likely reflecting the increased rates of atherosclerosis in men compared to women. Prevalence varies in the literature between 0.1-5% 4. Clinical presentation Most c...
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Coronary artery disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality globally.  Clinical presentation CAD is asymptomatic in most of the population. When severe enough it can cause angina, or an acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction. CAD may also present with heart failure or sudd...
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Coronary microvascular obstruction

Microvascular obstruction (MVO), also known as no reflow phenomenon, is an established complication encountered in coronary angioplasty for prolonged acute myocardial infarction.  Pathology The phenomenon results from obstruction of the myocardial microcirculation, which is composed of vessel...
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Corpus callosum impingement syndrome

Corpus callosum impingement syndrome (CCIS) is caused by impingement of the corpus callosal fibers against inferior free margin of the falx cerebri due to longstanding and severe hydrocephalus and stretching of the lateral ventricles. this results in ischaemia and eventually atrophy of the neura...
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Corpus luteal cyst

Corpus luteal (CL) cysts are a type of functional ovarian cyst that results when a corpus luteum fails to regress following the release of an ovum. When associated with pregnancy, it is the most common pelvic mass encountered within the 1st trimester. There is also some overlap with the term "ha...
Article

Cortical desmoid

Cortical desmoids, also known as cortical avulsive injuries or the Bufkin lesion, are a benign self-limiting entity. This is a classic "do not touch" lesion, and should not be confused with an aggressive cortical/periosteal process (e.g. osteosarcoma).  Terminology Cortical desmoid is a misnom...
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Cortical laminar necrosis

Cortical laminar necrosis, also known as pseudolaminar necrosis, is necrosis of neurons in the cortex of the brain in situations when supply of oxygen and glucose is inadequate to meet regional demands. This is often encountered in cardiac arrest, global hypoxia and hypoglycaemia.  Terminology ...
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Cortical vein thrombosis

Cortical vein thrombosis, also known as superficial cerebral vein thrombosis, is a subset of cerebral venous thrombosis involving the superficial cerebral veins besides the dural sinus, often coexisting with deep cerebral vein thrombosis or dural venous sinus thrombosis. It has different clinica...
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Cowdry bodies

Cowdry bodies are neuronal intranuclear inclusions seen in Herpes simplex virus infections.
Article

Crack lung

Crack lung is a term used to describe one of the respiratory complications of smoked crack cocaine. Clinical presentation Patients present with sympathetic hyperactivity such as tachycardia, hypertension, dilated pupils, and chest pain, productive cough, dyspnoea, and hypoxaemia along with fev...
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Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia

Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia is one of four types of fibrous dysplasia and is characterised, as the name suggests, by involvement of the skull and facial bones. For a general discussion of the underlying pathology, refer to the parent article fibrous dysplasia. Terminology Although the term...
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Craniosynostosis

Craniosynostosis refers to premature closure of the cranial sutures. The skull shape then undergoes characteristic changes depending on which suture(s) close early. Epidemiology There is a 3:1 male predominance. Pathology Primary forms are either sporadic or familial. Secondary craniosynosto...
Article

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a spongiform encephalopathy that results in a rapidly progressive dementia and other non-specific neurological features and death usually within a year or less from onset.   On imaging, it classically manifests as T2/FLAIR hyperintensities within the basal gan...
Article

Cricopharyngeal muscle spasm

Cricopharyngeal muscle spasm is also known as cricopharyngeal achalasia, although some authors distinguish between these entities, and may present as a cause of dysphagia. Terminology There is confusing use of the terms cricopharyngeal muscle spasm, cricopharyngeal achalasia and cricopharyngea...
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Critical zone in rotator cuff tendons

The critical zone of the rotator cuff is an area approximately 8-15 mm from the insertion of the rotator cuff tendons onto the greater tubercle of the humeral head, mainly within the supraspinatus tendon. This is a watershed zone between the anterior and posterior circumflex humeral, thoracoacro...
Article

Crossed fused renal ectopia

Crossed fused renal ectopia essentially refers to an anomaly where the kidneys are fused and located on the same side of the midline. Epidemiology The estimated incidence is around 1 out of 1000 births 1. There is a recognised male predilection with a 2:1 male to female ratio. More than 90% of...
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Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis

Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis (CV) is a form of immune mediated primary vasculitis involving small to medium sized vessels. It may involve multiple organs and can have a range of clinical presentations. Terminology There are three main types of cryoglobulinaemia which are grouped, as per the Br...
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Cryptococcosis

Cryptococcosis is a fungal infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, a globally distributed fungus that is commonly found in soil, especially that containing pigeon and avian droppings. Infection is acquired by inhaling spores of fungus.  Epidemiology Occurs worldwide without any defined en...
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Cryptorchidism

Cryptorchidism refers to an absence of a testis (or testes) in the scrotal sac. It may refer to an undescended testis, ectopic testis, or an atrophic or absent testis. Correct localisation of the testes is essential because surgical management varies on location. Pathology The testes develop i...
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CSF rhinorrhoea

CSF rhinorrhoea refers to a symptom of CSF leakage extracranially into paranasal sinuses. It can occur whenever there is osseous or dural defect of the skull base. Pathology Aetiology acquired chronic elevated ICP (pseudotumour cerebri) with medial sphenoid meningocoele formation traumatic:...
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CT cisternography

Computed tomography (CT) cisternography is an imaging technique used to diagnose CSF rhinorrhea or CSF otorrhea (CSF leaks), as CT allows the assessment of the bones of the base-of-skull.  Procedure pre-contrast CT is performed with thin slices 3-10 mL of an iodinated nonionic low-osmolar con...
Article

CT hypotension complex

CT hypotension complex refers to the predominantly abdominal imaging features that occur in the context of profound hypotension. Multiple abdominal organs can display atypical appearances not related to the initial trauma but reflect alterations in perfusion secondary to hypovolemia which affect...
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Cushing syndrome

Cushing syndrome is due to the effects of excessive glucocorticoids which may be exogenous or endogenous. Pathology In modern Western populations, iatrogenic steroid administration for treatment of inflammatory condition is the most common cause, e.g. asthma, rheumatoid arthritis. Endogenous ...
Article

Cutis laxa

Cutis laxa is a rare dermatological condition, characterised elastic fibre loss resulting in patients with very lax skin. Patients can also develop emphysema. Pathology Cutis laxa may be inherited (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked recessive) or may occur sporadically. Asso...
Article

Cyclops lesion (knee)

The cyclops lesion, also known as localised anterior arthrofibrosis, is a painful anterior knee mass that arise as a complication of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Epidemiology Cyclops lesions occur with an estimated frequency of ~5% (range 1-9.8%) of patients following ACL r...
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Cystic adventitial disease

Cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is an uncommon vascular pathology predominantly affecting peripheral vessels. The vast majority of cases occur in arteries with venous involvement being an even extremely rare occurrence 8. Epidemiology It typically affects young to middle-aged individuals with...
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Cystic endometrial hyperplasia

Cystic endometrial hyperplasia is the most common as well as the most benign form of endometrial hyperplasia. Radiographic features Ultrasound Typically shows endometrial thickening with associated cysts. Differential diagnosis For imaging appearences consider: prolonged proliferative phas...
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Cystic glioblastoma

Cystic glioblastoma is a descriptive term for one form of glioblastoma that contains a large cystic component, rather than being a pathological subtype.  Please refer to the main article on glioblastoma for a broad discussion on this tumour.  Radiographic features The main challenge in discri...
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Cystic hygroma

Cystic hygroma, also known as cystic or nuchal lymphangioma, refers to the cystic variety of congenital lymphangioma which, most commonly, occur in the cervicofacial regions, particularly at the posterior cervical triangle.  Epidemiology  They usually occur in the fetal/infantile and paediatri...
Article

Cysticercosis

Cysticercosis is a parasitic tissue infection caused by ingestion of tapeworm eggs through a fecal-oral transmission or auto-infection. Humans act as a definitive host in this disease. CNS manifestations are discussed individually on neurocysticercosis. Epidemiology The disease is endemic in ...
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Cytomegalovirus pulmonary infection

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia is a type of viral pneumonitis and occurs due infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), which is a member of the Herpetoviridae family. Epidemiology CMV infection is particularly important in those who are immunocompromised (e.g. those with AIDS / allogenic bone mar...
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Cytotoxic cerebral oedema

Cytotoxic cerebral oedema refers to a type of cerebral oedema, most commonly seen in cerebral ischaemia, in which extracellular water passes into cells, resulting in their swelling.  The term is frequently used in clinical practice to denote the combination of both true cytotoxic (cellular) oed...
Article

Dacryoadenitis

Dacryoadenitis is infection of the lacrimal gland results in diffuse homogeneous enlargement, which can sometimes compress the globe. Most common organisms are Staphylococcus aureus, mumps, infectious mononucleosis, and influenza virus.
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Dacryocystocele

Dacryocystoceles are caused by obstruction of both the proximal and distal ends of the nasolacrimal duct. An imperforate Hasner membrane causes the distal blockage, but the cause of proximal obstruction is less clearly understood. Epidemiology Dacryocystoceles, although rare, are the second mo...
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Dandy-Walker continuum

Dandy-Walker continuum, also referred as Dandy-Walker spectrum or Dandy-Walker complex, corresponds to a group of disorders believed to represent a continuum spectrum of posterior fossa malformations, characterised by a combined posterior fossa cyst communicating with the fourth ventricle as wel...
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Dandy-Walker variant

Dandy-Walker variant (DWv) is a less severe posterior fossa anomaly than the classic Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) and is considered being on the lesser end of the disease spectrum in the Dandy-Walker continuum. Terminology This term was created to include those malformations that do not mee...
Article

De Garengeot hernia

De Garengeot hernia is defined as a femoral hernia containing the appendix. It is a rare phenomenon, with only 1% of all femoral hernias containing the appendix (and usually found incidentally at surgery), and only 0.08-0.13% containing an incarcerated acute appendicitis (sometimes detected on p...
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De Quervain tenosynovitis

De Quervain tenosynovitis, also known as washerwoman's sprain/strain, is a painful stenosing tenosynovitis involving the first extensor (dorsal) tendon compartment of the wrist (typically at the radial styloid). This compartment contains the abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis b...
Article

De Quervain thyroiditis

De Quervain thyroiditis, or subacute granulomatous thyroiditis, is a form of self-limited subacute thyroiditis usually preceded by upper respiratory tract viral infection such as mumps, measles, coxsackie virus, adenovirus, and influenza viruses. Epidemiology It usually affects middle age fema...
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Degenerative disc disease

Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is an exceedingly common entity in the spine, encountered with increasing frequency throughout life and becoming almost universal in late adulthood to a varying degree. It is related to a combination biomechanical stresses and genetic predisposition which alter th...
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Dehiscent jugular bulb

Dehiscent jugular bulbs are present when the sigmoid plate between a high riding jugular bulb and the middle ear is absent, allowing the wall of the jugular bulb to bulge into the middle ear cavity. Epidemiology The estimated incidence may be around 3.5-7 % of the symptomatic population (e.g. ...
Article

Delayed onset muscle soreness

Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) refers to the muscular pain and swelling that follows unaccustomed exertion. Clinical presentation Patients may have an ache in affected muscles with reduced strength 4. Pathology DOMS is thought to occur from reversible microstructural muscle injury that...
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Dengue

Dengue is a mosquito-borne acute systemic viral infection caused by any of the four serotypes of the dengue virus. Clinical presentation The infection can lead to a broad spectrum of symptoms ranging from mild, nonspecific, influenza-like prodromes called dengue fever to more severe forms know...
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Dental caries

Dental caries are very common but can lead to serious morbidity.  Pathology Dental caries are areas of focal enamel and dentin deminerlisation. There are multiple theories in their pathogenesis but contributing factors include a combination of diet, anatomy, oral cavity microbiome and time 1,2...
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Dermolipoma

The dermolipoma is one of the fat-containing epibulbar mass lesions of lateral canthal area beneath the temporal or superotemporal bulbar conjunctivae. Epidemiology  Dermolipomas are congenital and more commonly seen in young patients with mean age of 30 years old. There is no gender predilect...
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Desmoid tumour

Desmoid tumours are benign, non-inflammatory fibroblastic tumours (see WHO 2002 classification of soft tissue tumours) with a tendency for local invasion and recurrence but without metastasis. Terminology The terms desmoid tumour and aggressive fibromatosis are occasionally used synonymously b...
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Desmoplastic fibroma

Desmoplastic fibromas (DF) are extremely rare bone tumours that do not metastasize, but may be locally aggressive. They are considered to be a bony counterpart of soft tissue desmoid tumours and are histologically identical.  Clinical presentation Incidence is ~0.3%. The most common areas of i...
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Desmoplastic small round cell tumour

Desmoplastic small round cell tumour (DSRCT) is a rare and highly aggressive primary peritoneal malignancy. It is seen usually in young adoloscent and has male predominance with a mean survival of 2-3 years. Clinical presentation It usually presents with a palpable abdominal mass and abdominal...
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Desquamative interstitial pneumonia

Desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP) is an interstitial pneumonia closely related to, and thought to represent the end stage of respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD) 1. It is associated with heavy smoking. Epidemiology It is considered one of the rarest of idiopathi...
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Determination of atrial situs

Atrial situs refers to the relative position of cardiac atria in relation to abdominal viscera and the midline. Pathology Identification of atrial situs is an important initial step in the antenatal and postnatal diagnosis of cardiac structural and situs anomalies. Radiographic features Basi...
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Diabetes insipidus

Diabetes insipidus (DI) is the deficiency or resistance to the hormone vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone), which results in polyuria and polydipsia.  Epidemiology DI occurs in 3 per 100,000 people 2.  Pathology DI may be described as 1-3: central/neurogenic/hypothalamic: vasopressin deficie...
Article

Diabetic mastopathy

Diabetic mastopathy (DMP) is a condition characterized by the presence of benign tumour like breast masses in women with long-standing type 1 or type 2 insulin-dependent diabetes. The condition has also been reported in men. Clinical presentation Diabetic mastopathy manifests clinically as a l...
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Diamond-Blackfan anaemia

Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, also known as pure red cell aplasia, is a rare congenital anaemia that typically presents in the first few years of life as a normocytic or macrocytic anaemia usually only affecting cells of the erythroid lineage 2. However, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia may occasion...
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Diaphragmatic eventration

Diaphragmatic eventration refers to an abnormal contour of the diaphragmatic dome. It typically affects only a segment of the hemidiaphragm, compared to paralysis/weakness where the entire hemidiaphragm is typically affected.  Pathology Diaphragmatic eventration is congenital in nature and due...
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Diastematomyelia

Diastematomyelia, also known as a split cord malformation, refers to a type of spinal dysraphism (spina bifida occulta) when there is a longitudinal split in the spinal cord.  Terminology Although traditionally it has been distinguished from diplomyelia (in which the cord is duplicated rather ...
Article

Diffuse axonal injury

Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a severe form of traumatic brain injury due to shearing forces. It is a potentially difficult diagnosis to make on imaging alone, especially on CT as the finding can be subtle, however, it has the potential to result in severe neurological impairment.  The diagnos...
Article

Diffuse brainstem gliomas

Diffuse brainstem gliomas, also known as diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma (DIBG), is a term used to describe infiltrating astrocytomas, no longer recognised as a distinct entity in the 2016 update to the WHO classification of CNS tumours. It encompassed a variety of tumours, ranging from WHO g...
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Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia

Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) is an extremely rare pulmonary disorder where there is a proliferation of neuroendocrine cells within the lung. It is however recognised with increasing frequency. Epidemiology There may be an increased female predilection ...
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Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), also referred to as Forestier disease, is a common condition characterised by bony proliferation at sites of tendinous and ligamentous insertion of the spine affecting elderly individuals. On imaging, it is typically characterised by the flowing ...
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Diffuse oesophageal spasm

Diffuse/distal oesophageal spasm (DOS) is a motility disorder of the oesophagus. On barium swallow, DOS may appear as a corkscrew or rosary bead oesophagus, but this is uncommon. Manometry is the gold-standard diagnostic test.  Diffuse oesophageal spasm differs from hypercontracting oesophagus ...
Article

Diffuse panbronchiolitis

Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) or Asian panbronchiolitis is an idiopathic progressive inflammatory small airway obstructive lung disease. Epidemiology There is striking predilection in east Asia (e.g. Japan, Korea, China). It tends to present in middle aged (~ 30-60-year-old) adults, often non...
Article

Diffuse peritoneal leiomyomatosis

Diffuse/disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis (DPL), also known as leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata, is an exceedingly rare benign disorder characterised by multiple vascular leiomyomas growing along the submesothelial tissues of the abdominopelvic peritoneum. Epidemiology DPL is usual...
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Disc extrusion

Disc extrusion is a type of intervertebral disc herniation and is distinguished from a disc protrusion in that it: in at least one plane, has a broader dome (B) than a neck (A)and/or extends above or below the disc level (into the suprapedicular or infrapedicular zone) Disc extrusions are ass...
Article

Disc sequestration

Sequestrated disc, also referred to as a free disc fragment, corresponds to extruded disc material that has no continuity with the parent disc and is displaced away from the site of extrusion. By definition, it corresponds to a subtype of disc extrusion. The term "migrated" disc refers only to ...
Article

Discogenic vertebral sclerosis

Discogenic vertebral sclerosis is one of the skeletal "do not touch" lesions and should not be confused with a metastatic lesion or disc space infection. It can lead to an unnecessary biopsy. Clinical presentation The typical clinical presentation is a middle-aged female with chronic low back ...
Article

Dorsal dermal sinus

Dorsal dermal sinus (DDS) is an epithelium-lined tract from the skin to the spinal cord, cauda equina, or arachnoid. Pathology Dorsal dermal sinus is caused by incomplete separation of the superficial ectoderm from the neural ectoderm, resulting in a focal segmental adhesion. Later during emb...
Article

Dorsal epidural disc migration

Dorsal epidural disc migration represents, as the name suggests, migration of disc material, usually a sequestrated disc fragment, into the dorsal (posterior) epidural space, posterior to the theca. This is a rare occurrence, often not suspected preoperatively and is almost invariably encountere...
Article

Dorsal pancreatic agenesis

Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is an extremely rare congenital pancreatic anomaly.  While complete agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is extremely rare, partial agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is thought to be most common than ventral pancreatic agenesis 4. Clinical presentation While many pati...
Article

Dorsal thoracic arachnoid web

Dorsal thoracic arachnoid web is a cause of focal thoracic cord distortion with resulting neurological dysfunction.  Clinical presentation Due to the limited number of reported cases the incidence of this condition may well be under-recognised. The cases reported have a variety of signs and sy...
Article

Double outlet right ventricle

Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a congenital cardiac anomaly where both the aorta and pulmonary trunk arise from the morphologically right ventricle. It is reported to account for ~2% of congenital cardiac defects 1. It is usually classed as a conotruncal anomaly. There is almost always ...
Article

Dracunculiasis

Dracunculiasis (also known as guinea worm disease) is a potentially disabling infection caused by Dracunculus medinensis (meaning "little worm from Medina"). Clinical presentation The radiologic finding of a calcified guinea worm is common in endemic areas.  In the vast majority of cases (one...
Article

Ductal adenoma of the breast

A ductal adenoma of the breast is a benign glandular tumour of the breast that usually fills and distends the ductal lumen. Epidemiology They may occur in women of all ages, although the majority of patients are 60 years of age or greater 3. Clinical presentation Ductal adenomas usually pres...
Article

Ductal carcinoma in situ

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) refers to a breast carcinoma limited to the ducts with no extension beyond the basement membrane, as a result of which the disease has not infiltrated the parenchyma of the breast and the lymphatics and cannot therefore metastasise. Epidemiology The detection of...
Article

Ductus deferens calcification

Calcification of the ductus deferens can result from: diabetes mellitus - most common normal ageing chronic infection - more frequently irregular and unilateral tuberculosis syphilis gonorrhea schistosomiasis chronic urinary tract infection
Article

Duodenal diverticulitis

Duodenal diverticulitis is a rare, inflammatory complication of duodenal diverticula.  Clinical presentation While the vast majority of patients are asymptomatic, patients with diverticulitis usually present with epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting.  Radiographic features CT duodenal diver...
Article

Duodenitis

Duodenitis is a term given to inflammation of the duodenum. Pathology Aetiology A duodenitis can result from both intrinsic processes within the duodenum as well as from processes occuring outside the duodendum. It can occur from infective as well as non-infective inflammatory processes. Non...
Article

Dural metastases

Dural or pachymeningeal metastases are a relatively common cause of dural masses, although they are less common than brain metastases and meningiomas. They can occur both within the spine and intracranially - this article is focussed on intracranial dural masses.  Clinical presentation Patient...
Article

Dural sinus malformations

Dural sinus malformations (DSMs) are congenital vascular malformations characterized by massive dilatation of one or more dural venous sinuses. This condition is typically associated with arteriovenous shunts (DAVS). Sub types There are two types of DSMs DSM involving the confluence of sinuse...
Article

Dural sinus occlusive disease

Dural sinus occlusive disease (DSOD) is an infective form of dural sinus thrombosis (thrombophlebitis) commonly seen in the setting of acute otomastoiditis. It typically presents with: severe headaches high fevers sixth nerve palsy - due to involvement of Dorello's canal altered conscious st...
Article

Duret haemorrhage

Duret haemorrhage is a small haemorrhage (or multiple haemorrhages) seen in the medulla or pons of patients who are rapidly herniating.  Pathology Raised supratentorial pressure causes the brainstem and mesial temporal lobes to be forced downwards through the tentorial hiatus. As a result of t...
Article

Duverney fracture

Duverney fractures are a type of pelvic fracture most commonly occurring in the setting of a direct blow to the ilium, with a resultant isolated iliac wing fracture. It is regarded as a stable injury but may be operated on in the event of severe comminution.  History and etymology It is named ...
Article

Dysphagia lusoria

Dysphagia lusoria is an impairment of swallowing due to compression from an aberrant right subclavian artery (arteria lusoria). Clinical presentation Most patients with aberrant right subclavian arteries do not have symptoms. Some present with mild dysphagia, while a small minority have a seve...

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