Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

359 results found
Article

Atlanto-occipital dissociation injuries

Atlanto-occipital dissociation (AOD) injuries are severe and include both atlanto-occipital dislocations and atlanto-occipital subluxations. Pathology The tectorial membrane and alar ligaments provide the most stability to the atlanto-occipital joint, and injury to these ligaments results in i...
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Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis

Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis is the less severe type of osteopetrosis and should be considered and compared with the other subtype: autosomal recessive osteopetrosis. The autosomal dominant (AD) type is less severe than its autosomal recessive (AR) mate. Hence, it is also given the name "ben...
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Avascular necrosis of the hip

Avascular necrosis of the hip is more common than other sites, presumably due to a combination of precarious blood supply and high loading when standing.  Clinical presentation The most common presenting symptom is a pain in the region of affected hip, thigh, groin, and buttock. Although few p...
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Baker cyst

Baker cysts, or popliteal cysts, are fluid-filled distended synovial-lined bursa arising in the popliteal fossa between the medial head of the gastrocnemius and the semimembranosus tendons via a communication with the knee joint. They are usually located at or below the joint line. Epidemiology...
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Baxter neuropathy

Baxter neuropathy is a nerve entrapment syndrome resulting from the compression of the inferior calcaneal nerve (Baxter nerve). The inferior calcaneal nerve is the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve which courses in a medial to lateral direction between the abductor hallucis muscle and t...
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Benign fibrous histiocytoma of bone

Benign fibrous histiocytoma is closely related to fibroxanthoma of bone, is a rare lesion usually occurring in the skin where it is known as dermatofibroma. Clinical presentation Typically presents with pain, and most often in the third decade. Pathology Only a few case reports have been pub...
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Biceps brachii tendon rupture

A biceps brachii rupture can occur at either superior or inferior end but most commonly involves the long head at its proximal attachment to superior glenoid labrum. The biceps tendon has a fibrous covering (the lacertus fibrosus) that can clinically feel similar to an intact tendon even though...
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Biceps chondromalacia

Biceps chondromalacia is an attritional lesion of the humeral head caused by repeated abrasion by the intra-articular segment of the long head of biceps tendon. Pathology The long head of biceps brachii arises from the supraglenoid tubercle of the glenoid fossa and has intrarticular and extra-...
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Bicipitoradial bursitis

Bicipitoradial bursitis refers to inflammation of the bicipitoradial bursa.  The bicipitoradial bursa surrounds the biceps tendon in supination. In pronation, the radial tuberosity rotates posteriorly, which compresses the bicipitoradial bursa between the biceps tendon and the radial cortex whi...
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Bisphosphonate related proximal femoral fractures

Bisphosphonate-related proximal femoral fractures are an example of insufficiency fractures, although the direct causative link remains somewhat controversial 2. The atypical fracture pattern occurs in the proximal third of the femur, typically subtrochanteric, and may be unilateral or bilatera...
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Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation

Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation (BPOP) (also known as a Nora lesion) is a benign exophytic osteochondral lesion which has an appearance similar to an osteochondroma, and is typically seen in the hands and feet.  BPOPs are continuous with the underlying cortex, but usually wit...
Article

Bloom syndrome

Bloom syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, brachydactyly, malar hypoplasia and facial telangiectesia, erythema and cafe au lait spots. Affected individuals have increased risk of developing malignancies. Pathology There is extreme chromosomal fragilit...
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Blount disease

Blount disease refers to a local disturbance of growth of the medial proximal tibial epiphysis that results in tibia vara. The condition is commonly bilateral.  Epidemiology There is no recognised inheritance pattern.  Clinical presentation Clinically, the child often presents with leg bowin...
Article

Bone contusion

Bone (marrow) contusion (bone bruising or bone marrow oedema) is an osseous injury which may result from compression of bone structures. Pathology Bone contusions represent microfractures with haemorrhage and can progress to osteochondritis dissecans 2. They typically appear within 48 hours of...
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Bone deformity from softening

Conditions associated with bone deformity from softening includes: hourglass thorax bowing of long bones acetabular protrusion buckled/compressed pelvis biconcave vertebral bodies / codfish vertebra
Article

Bone infarction

Bone infarction is a term used to refer to osteonecrosis within the metaphysis or diaphysis of a bone. Necrosis is a type of cell death due to irreversible cell injury, which can be recognised microscopically by alterations in the cytoplasm (becomes eosinophilic) and in the nucleus (swelling, py...
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Bony humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament lesion

Bony humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (BHAGL) lesion is just like its slightly shorter relative HAGL lesion, except as the name suggests a bony avulsion fracture is seen at humeral insertion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament. It is often associated with a subscapularis tear, an...
Article

Botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma

A botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma is a type of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and accounts for 5-10% of all rhabdomyosarcomas 6.  Epidemiology It tends to occur in paediatric population, often between birth and 15 years of age 7. Pathology Rhabdomyosarcomas generally have a nonspecific infiltrative ap...
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Bowdler spurs

Bowdler spurs refer to transverse long bone midshaft spurs or osteochondral projections associated with hypophosphatasia. They typically occur in the fibulae and less commonly in the forearms.
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Brachial plexus injuries

Brachial plexus injuries are a spectrum of upper limb neurological deficits secondary to partial or complete injury to the brachial plexus, which provides the nerve supply of upper limb muscles.  Clinical presentation Trauma, usually by motor vehicle accidents, involves severe traction on the ...
Article

Brachymetatarsia

Brachymetatarsia (a.k.a. congenital short metatarsus) is a rare condition that develops from early closure of the growth plate.  Epidemiology Females are almost exclusively affected 1.  Pathology Location It typically involves the fourth ray or, less frequently, more than one metatarsal bon...
Article

Brodie abscess

Brodie abscess is an intraosseous abscess related to a focus of subacute pyogenic osteomyelitis. Unfortunately, there is no reliable way radiographically to exclude a focus of osteomyelitis. It has a protean radiographic appearance and can occur at any location and in a patient of any age. It mi...
Article

Brown tumour

Brown tumour, also known as osteitis fibrosa cystica (OFC) or, rarely osteoclastoma, is one of the manifestations of hyperparathyroidism. It represents a reparative cellular process, rather than a neoplastic process. Histologically brown tumours are identical to giant cell tumour (both are osteo...
Article

Brucellosis

Brucellosis is a global zoonotic infection secondary to any of the four Brucella spp. that infect humans. It can be focal or systemic, but has a particular affinity for the musculoskeletal system.  Epidemiology Brucellosis occurs worldwide but is particularly prevalent in Mediterranean regions...
Article

Bursitis

Bursitis is inflammation of the bursa, a synovial membrane, present in a number of joints. The inflammation may be acute or chronic, in the later case calcification may be apparent on plain radiographs. MRI best illustrates the bursa and related pathology. Specific pathological types calcific ...
Article

Café au lait spots

Café au lait spots are a type of pigmented skin lesions which are classically described as being light brown in colour.   Conditions associated with them include: neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome McCune-Albright syndrome: typically irregular which has been likened to ...
Article

Caisson disease

Caisson disease is an uncommon diving-related decompression illness that is an acute neurological emergency typically occurring in deep sea divers.  Diving-related decompression illness is classified into two main categories 3: Arterial gas embolism secondary to pulmonary decompression barotra...
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Calcific bursitis

Calcific bursitis is the result of deposition calcium hydroxyapatite crystals. It is closely related to calcific tendinitis, and many authors refer to them as being the same condition. 
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Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease

Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate disease (CPPD disease), also referred as pyrophosphate arthropathy and perhaps confusingly as pseudogout, is common, especially in the elderly, and is characterised by the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate in soft tissues and cartilage. Terminology  CPPD is on...
Article

Camptocormia

Camptocormia (bent spine syndrome) is a rare syndrome characterised by involuntary flexion of the thoracolumbar spine with weight-bearing which reduces when laying down, and is due to isolated atrophy of the paraspinal muscles. Associations This condition may be associated Parkinson disease: ...
Article

Carpal boss

The carpal boss is an unmovable hypertrophied bony protuberance at the base of the second or third metacarpals on the dorsal surface, near the capitate and trapezium.  Pathology The condition may represent either or a combination of: degenerative osteophyte formation os styloideum (an access...
Article

Cavernous venous malformation

Cavernous venous malformation, also traditionally referred to as a cavernous haemangioma (despite it not being a tumour) or cavernomas, are non-neoplastic slow flow venous malformations found in many parts of the body.  Terminology Despite the ubiquity of use of the traditional terms cavernoma...
Article

Cervical canal stenosis

Cervical canal stenosis can be acquired (e.g. trauma, discs, and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament) or congenital. It refers to narrowing of the spinal canal, nerve root canals, or intervertebral foramina of the cervical spine. Radiographic features normal AP diameter is ~17 ...
Article

Cervical spine floating pillar

A floating pillar, also referred as pedicolaminar fracture-separation injury, is characterised by fractures through the pedicle and lamina of a cervical spine vertebrae creating a free-floating articular pillar fragment. It is an unstable cervical spine fracture that results from hyperflexion–la...
Article

Charcot joint

Charcot joint, also known as a neuropathic or neurotrophic joint, refers to a progressive degenerative/destructive joint disorder in patients with abnormal pain sensation and proprioception. Epidemiology In modern Western societies by far the most common cause of Charcot joints is diabetes, an...
Article

Chondroblastoma

Chondroblastomas, also referred as Codman tumours, are rare benign cartilaginous neoplasms that characteristically arise in the epiphysis or apophysis of a long bone in young patients. Despite being rare, they are one of the most frequently encountered benign epiphyseal neoplasms in skeletally i...
Article

Chondrodysplasia punctata

Chondrodysplasia punctata (CDP) is a collective name for a heterogenous group of skeletal dysplasias. Calcific stippling of cartilage and peri-articular soft tissues is often a common feature. Pathology Subtypes It can be broadly divided into rhizomelic and non-rhizomelic forms: rhizomelic c...
Article

Chondroid lipoma

Chondroid lipomas are rare benign soft tissue tumours that, as you might guess, contain a varied ratio of both fat and cartilage. These lesions can be diagnostically confusing as they may mimic or be confused with other fat containing neoplasms, most importantly those of much greater clinical si...
Article

Chondrolysis

Chondrolysis, also known as acute cartilage necrosis, is an acute cartilage destruction of the femoral head. It is one of the complications that are specifically associated with slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). It is a poorly understood phenomenon. Epidemiology The quoted incidence is...
Article

Chondromalacia patellae

Chondromalacia patellae refers to softening and degeneration of the articular hyaline cartilage of the patella and is a frequent cause of anterior knee pain. Epidemiology Tends to occur in young adults. There is a recognised female predilection. Clinical presentation Patients with chondromal...
Article

Chondromyxoid fibroma

Chondromyxoid fibromas (CMFs) are extremely rare, benign cartilaginous neoplasms that account for <1% of all bone tumours. Epidemiology  The majority of cases occur in the second and third decades, with ~75% of cases occurring before the age of 30 years 1,12-15.  There is no recognised gender ...
Article

Chronic hip subluxation

Chronic hip subluxation most common occurs in paediatric patients with neuromuscular disorders (e.g. cerebral palsy). It is considered a form of developmental hip dysplasia.  Epidemiology Chronic hip subluxation occurs in ~45% of cerebral palsy patients who are not walking by 5 years of age 3....
Article

Clasp-knife deformity

Clasp-knife deformity is relatively common congenital anomaly found at the lumbosacral junction.   Clinical presentation Clasp-knife syndrome, is one of many causes of low back pain. It occurs when a clasp-knife deformity is accompanied by pain on extension secondary to protrusion of the enlar...
Article

Coccidioidomycosis

Coccidioidomycosis refers to an infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Coccidioides spp, usually localised to the lungs. This disease is not to be confused with the similarly named paracoccidioidomycosis. Epidemiology The most common forms of Coccidioides spp are Coccidioides immitis and Coc...
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Complex meniscal tear

Complex meniscal tears extend in more than one plane, and can in turn create separate flaps of meniscus.  Radiographic features MRI knee The mensical tear usually includes a combination of radial, horizontal, and longitudinal components (any two or all three). Often the meniscus substance app...
Article

Congenital insensitivity to pain

Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) refers to group of rare hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANs) characterised by an inability to feel pain 1. Terminology Although not clearly defined in the literature, CIP is not one specific diagnosis, but describes symptoms common to man...
Article

Congenital lumbar spinal stenosis

Congenital lumbar spinal stenosis (CLSS) is a type of vertebral central canal stenosis and has a different epidemiology with less severe degenerative change compared to acquired/degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.  Epidemiology CLSS tends to affect patients at a younger age (30-50 years old) ...
Article

Congenital muscular dystrophies (central nervous system manifestations)

Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive myopathies presenting at birth with hypotonia, delayed motor development, and early onset of progressive muscle weakness, confirmed with a dystrophic pattern on muscle biopsy.  Clinical presentation There is...
Article

Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the clavicle

Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the clavicle is a rare condition, which typically presents as an isolated anatomical variant.  Clinical presentation Usually presents as a midclavicular swelling in the neonate or young child 1.  Pathology Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the clavicle is more commo...
Article

Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia

Congenital tibial pseudoarthrosis of the tibia describes abnormal bowing that can progress to a segment of bone loss simulating the appearance of a joint. The condition is usually apparent shortly after birth and is rarely diagnosed after the age of two. Pathology The aetiology is unclear, how...
Article

Congenital radial head dislocation

Congenital radial head dislocation is the most common congenital elbow abnormality. It can occur in isolation, or more commonly may be associated with other conditions or syndromes. Epidemiology Overall, congenital radial head dislocation is rare 2. Clinical presentation Congenital radial he...
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Congenital talipes equinovarus

Congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) is considered the most common anomaly affecting the feet diagnosed on antenatal ultrasound. Terminology While some use CTEV and club foot (CF) synonymously, in certain publications term clubfoot is considered a more general descriptive term that describes ...
Article

Conus medullaris syndrome

Conus medullaris syndrome is caused by an injury or insult to the conus medullaris and lumbar nerve roots. It is a clinical subset of spinal cord injury syndromes. Injuries at the level of T12 to L2 vertebrae are most likely to result in conus medullaris syndrome. Pathology The conus medullari...
Article

Coraco-clavicular ligament injury

Coracoclavicular (CC) ligament injury is common with shoulder trauma. It is considered part of the spectrum of acromioclavicular joint injuries 2 and is not often an isolated injury. It is also often injured with clavicular fractures.  This injury is easy to miss, especially with presence of an...
Article

Cortical desmoid

Cortical desmoids, also known as cortical avulsive injuries or the Bufkin lesion, are a benign self-limiting entity. This is a classic "do not touch" lesion, and should not be confused with an aggressive cortical/periosteal process (e.g. osteosarcoma).  Terminology Cortical desmoid is a misnom...
Article

Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia

Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia is one of four types of fibrous dysplasia and is characterised, as the name suggests, by involvement of the skull and facial bones. For a general discussion of the underlying pathology, refer to the parent article fibrous dysplasia. Terminology Although the term...
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Craniosynostosis

Craniosynostosis refers to premature closure of the cranial sutures. The skull shape then undergoes characteristic changes depending on which suture(s) close early. Epidemiology There is a 3:1 male predominance. Pathology Primary forms are either sporadic or familial. Secondary craniosynosto...
Article

Critical zone in rotator cuff tendons

The critical zone of the rotator cuff is an area approximately 8-15 mm from the insertion of the rotator cuff tendons onto the greater tubercle of the humeral head, mainly within the supraspinatus tendon. This is a watershed zone between the anterior and posterior circumflex humeral, thoracoacro...
Article

Cutis laxa

Cutis laxa is a rare dermatological condition, characterised elastic fibre loss resulting in patients with very lax skin. Patients can also develop emphysema. Pathology Cutis laxa may be inherited (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked recessive) or may occur sporadically. Asso...
Article

Cyclops lesion (knee)

The cyclops lesion, also known as localised anterior arthrofibrosis, is a painful anterior knee mass that arises as a complication of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Epidemiology Cyclops lesions occur with an estimated frequency of ~5% (range 1-9.8%) of patients following ACL ...
Article

Cystic adventitial disease

Cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is an uncommon vascular pathology predominantly affecting peripheral vessels. The vast majority of cases occur in arteries with venous involvement being an even extremely rare occurrence 8. Epidemiology It typically affects young to middle-aged individuals with...
Article

Cysticercosis

Cysticercosis is a parasitic tissue infection caused by ingestion of tapeworm eggs through a fecal-oral transmission or auto-infection. Humans act as a definitive host in this disease. CNS manifestations are discussed individually on neurocysticercosis. Epidemiology The disease is endemic in ...
Article

Degenerative disc disease

Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is an exceedingly common entity in the spine, encountered with increasing frequency throughout life and becoming almost universal in late adulthood to a varying degree. It is related to a combination biomechanical stresses and genetic predisposition which alter th...
Article

Delayed onset muscle soreness

Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) refers to the muscular pain and swelling that follows unaccustomed exertion. Clinical presentation Patients may have an ache in affected muscles with reduced strength 4. Pathology DOMS is thought to occur from reversible microstructural muscle injury that...
Article

De Quervain tenosynovitis

De Quervain tenosynovitis, also known as washerwoman's sprain/strain, is a painful stenosing tenosynovitis involving the first extensor (dorsal) tendon compartment of the wrist (typically at the radial styloid). This compartment contains the abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis b...
Article

Desmoid tumour

Desmoid tumours are benign, non-inflammatory fibroblastic tumours (see WHO 2002 classification of soft tissue tumours) with a tendency for local invasion and recurrence but without metastasis. Terminology The terms desmoid tumour and aggressive fibromatosis are occasionally used synonymously b...
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Desmoplastic fibroma

Desmoplastic fibromas (DF) are extremely rare bone tumours that do not metastasize, but may be locally aggressive. They are considered to be a bony counterpart of soft tissue desmoid tumours and are histologically identical.  Clinical presentation Incidence is ~0.3%. The most common areas of i...
Article

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), also referred to as Forestier disease, is a common condition characterised by bony proliferation at sites of tendinous and ligamentous insertion of the spine affecting elderly individuals. On imaging, it is typically characterised by the flowing ...
Article

Disc extrusion

Disc extrusion is a type of intervertebral disc herniation and is distinguished from a disc protrusion in that it: in at least one plane, has a broader dome (B) than a neck (A)and/or extends above or below the disc level (into the suprapedicular or infrapedicular zone) Disc extrusions are ass...
Article

Discogenic vertebral sclerosis

Discogenic vertebral sclerosis is one of the skeletal "do not touch" lesions and should not be confused with a metastatic lesion or disc space infection. It can lead to an unnecessary biopsy. Clinical presentation The typical clinical presentation is a middle-aged female with chronic low back ...
Article

Disc sequestration

Sequestrated disc, also referred to as a free disc fragment, corresponds to extruded disc material that has no continuity with the parent disc and is displaced away from the site of extrusion. By definition, it corresponds to a subtype of disc extrusion. The term "migrated" disc refers only to ...
Article

Dorsal epidural disc migration

Dorsal epidural disc migration represents, as the name suggests, migration of disc material, usually a sequestrated disc fragment, into the dorsal (posterior) epidural space, posterior to the theca. This is a rare occurrence, often not suspected preoperatively and is almost invariably encountere...
Article

Dracunculiasis

Dracunculiasis (also known as guinea worm disease) is a potentially disabling infection caused by Dracunculus medinensis (meaning "little worm from Medina"). Clinical presentation The radiologic finding of a calcified guinea worm is common in endemic areas.  In the vast majority of cases (one...
Article

Duverney fracture

Duverney fractures are a type of pelvic fracture most commonly occurring in the setting of a direct blow to the ilium, with a resultant isolated iliac wing fracture. It is regarded as a stable injury but may be operated on in the event of severe comminution.  History and etymology It is named ...
Article

Ectodermal dysplasia

Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) refers to a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that cause abnormal ectoderm development. The effect is a non-progressive defect in the development of two or more tissues derived from embryonic ectoderm.  Epidemiology ED is rare with an estimated prevalence of 1:...
Article

Ectrodactyly

Ectrodactyly (also known as a split hand-split foot malformation, cleft hand or lobster claw hand) is a skeletal anomaly predominantly affecting the hands (although the feet can also be affected). The condition has a highly variable severity. Epidemiology The estimated incidence is at ~ 1 in 9...
Article

Elastofibroma dorsi

Elastofibroma dorsi is a benign soft-tissue tumour with a characteristic location and imaging appearance. Epidemiology It is more frequently seen in older women, with a reported female predilection of 5-13:1. The estimated mean age at diagnosis around 65-70 years. Clinical presentation Elast...
Article

Enchondroma

Enchondromas (or chondromas 7) are a relatively common benign medullary cartilaginous neoplasm with benign imaging features. They account for the E in the popular mnemonic for bubbly bone lesions FEGNOMASHIC. They are sometimes classified under the umbrella term low grade chondral series tumours...
Article

Enostosis

An enostosis (pl. enostoses, also known as a "bone island") is a common benign bone lesion, usually seen as an incidental finding. They constitute a small focus of compact bone within cancellous bone. Enostoses can be seen on radiographs, CT, and MRI, and are considered one of the skeletal “don’...
Article

Enteropathic arthritis

Enteropathic arthritis (EA) is a form of chronic, inflammatory arthritis associated with the occurrence of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and is classified as a form of seronegative spondyloarthropathy. Epidemiology Approximately 20% of people with Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis may...
Article

Eosinophilic fasciitis

Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF), also known as Shulman syndrome, is an uncommon connective tissue disorder. Epidemiology It can potentially present at age. There is a recognized female predilection 3-4. Clinical presentation Patients typically present with pronounced extremity oedema and skin in...
Article

Epidermal inclusion cyst

Epidermal inclusion cysts are common cutaneous lesions that represent proliferation of squamous epithelium within a confined space in the dermis or subdermis. Terminology Synonyms include "epidermoid cyst" and "epidermoid inclusion cyst". These are occasionally termed "sebaceous cyst", althoug...
Article

Erdheim-Chester disease

Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell, non-familial multisystemic granulomatosis, with widespread manifestations and of highly variable severity. The most common presenting symptom is bone pain. Epidemiology Erdheim-Chester disease is a rare, non-inherited disease of midd...
Article

Ewing sarcoma

Ewing sarcoma is the second most common highly malignant primary bone tumour of childhood after osteosarcoma, typically arising from medullary cavity with invasion of Haversian system. They usually present as moth-eaten destructive permeative lucent lesions in the shaft of long bones with large ...
Article

Ewing sarcoma (chest wall)

Ewing sarcoma family of tumours (ESFT), also referred as Ewing sarcomas of the chest wall, are malignant tumours affecting children and young adults, originating either from the osseous structures or the soft tissues of the chest wall.  On imaging, they are usually characterised as a large extr...
Article

Excessive lateral pressure syndrome

Excessive lateral pressure syndrome (ELPS) is abnormal  lateral tilt of the patella without lateral translation and considered one of the relatively common causes of anterior knee pain. It can affect both adolescents or adults. Patients usually present with insidious onset anterior knee pain agg...
Article

Exostosis

Exostoses are defined as benign growths of bone extending outwards from the surface of a bone. It can occur in any bone and be triggered by a number of factors. There are a number of examples of exostoses that occur due to local irritant stimuli: ivory exostosis exostosis of the external audit...
Article

Extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma

Extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (EES) is included in the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) along with Ewing sarcoma of bone, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), peripheral neuroepithelioma, and thoracopulmonary PNET (Askin tumour). When compared with Ewing sarcoma of bone, extraskeletal Ewin...
Article

Extra skeletal osteosarcoma

Extraskeletal osteosarcoma (ESOS) is a rare mesenchymal malignant tumour that occurs in the retroperitoneum and soft tissue of extremities without any attachment to bone. Epidemiology ESOS in contrast to other subtypes of osteosarcoma occurs infrequently in individuals under 40 years of age, m...
Article

Familial multiple lipomatosis

Familial multiple lipomatosis (FML) is a hereditary syndrome of multiple encapsulated lipomas which are found on the trunk and extremities, with relative sparing of the head and shoulders.  It is clinically distinct from the similarly named multiple symmetric lipomatosis with which it is freque...
Article

Fanconi anaemia

Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare disorder characterised by progressive bone marrow failure, various congenital abnormalities, and predisposition to malignancies (often acute myeloid leukaemia). It is considered the commonest type of inherited marrow failure syndrome 7.  Terminology Fanconi anaem...
Article

Fat pad impingement syndromes of the knee

In fat-pad impingement syndromes the aetiologies are different for each knee fat pad. In anterior suprapatellar fat pad impingment syndrome the cause is usually due to either a developmental cause related to the anatomy of the extensor mechanism, or may be related to abnormal mechanics. In this...
Article

Femoral hernia

Femoral hernias are a type of groin herniation and comprise of a protrusion of a peritoneal sac through the femoral ring into the femoral canal, posterior and inferior to the inguinal ligament. The sac may contain preperitoneal fat, omentum, small bowel, or other structures. Epidemiology There...

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