Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

430 results found
Article

May-Thurner syndrome

May-Thurner syndrome refers to a chronic compression of the left common iliac vein (CIV) against the lumbar vertebrae by the overlying right common iliac artery (CIA), with or without deep venous thrombosis 2. Although both left and right CIVs lie deep to the right common iliac artery, the left...
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Femoral facial syndrome

Femoral facial syndrome, also known as femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome, is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by varying degrees of femoral hypoplasia and facial dysmorphism 1. Clinical presentation Femoral facial syndrome can cause varying degrees of femoral malformation rang...
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Hepatopulmonary syndrome

Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) refers to the combination of hepatic dysfunction (cirrhosis) hypoxaemia (alveolar-arterial O2 gradient of >15 mmHg; >20 mmHg in >64 years old patients) peripheral pulmonary arterial dilatation (due to right to left micro-shunts) Epidemiology It is estimated to...
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Currarino syndrome

The Currarino syndrome is a complex condition variably comprised of characteristic congenital anomalies of the sacrum, anorectum and presacral soft tissues. It is also known as the Currarino triad or ASP triad, however, not all three features are always present 6.  anorectal malformation or con...
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Cavitating mesenteric lymph node syndrome

Cavitary mesenteric lymph node syndrome is seen in association with coeliac disease and is characterised by the triad of: splenic atrophy  low-attenuation lymphadenopathy that sometimes contains fat-fluid levels villous atrophy
Article

Jarcho-Levin syndrome

The Jarcho-Levin syndrome (JLS) or spondylothoracic dysostosis is a rare autosomal recessive heterogeneous disorder that can occur with variable severity. Previously the condition spondylocostal dysostosis was also considered as part of the JLS spectrum but is now considered a distinct pathologi...
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Conn syndrome

Conn syndrome (or primary hyperaldosteronism) is a condition of excess of aldosterone production and occurs secondary to adrenal cortical adenoma, bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, or rarely, adrenal carcinoma. Differentiation between the causes is required to avoid unnecessary surgery.  Clinical ...
Article

Subclavian steal syndrome

Subclavian steal syndrome (SSS) and subclavian steal phenomenon both result from occlusion or severe stenosis of the proximal subclavian artery resulting in retrograde flow in the ipsilateral vertebral artery. Terminology Subclavian steal phenomenon refers to steno-occlusive disease of the pro...
Article

Roberts syndrome

Roberts syndrome, also known as Roberts-SC phocomelia syndrome, pseudothalidomide syndrome, or Appelt-Gerken-Lenz syndrome, is a rare congenital malformation syndrome. Clinical presentation general intrauterine growth restriction postnatal growth retardation failure to thrive thrombocytope...
Article

Kasabach-Merritt syndrome

Kasabach-Merritt syndrome, also known as haemangioma thrombocytopenia syndrome, is a rare life-threatening disease found in infants in which a rapidly growing vascular tumour is responsible for thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and consumptive coagulopathy. Pathology Vascul...
Article

Multiple system atrophy

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic neurodegenerative disease (one of the synucleinopathies) characterised by varying degrees of cerebellar ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, parkinsonism and corticospinal dysfunction.  Epidemiology Multiple systemic atrophy is a sporadic disease, with a p...
Article

Segmental arterial mediolysis

Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an increasingly recognised vascular disease of the middle-aged and elderly and a leading cause of spontanoeus intra-abdominal haemorrhage. It is characterised by fusiform aneurysms, stenoses, dissections and occlusions within splanchnic arterial branches. I...
Article

Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis

Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), previously known as the Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), is a small to medium vessel necrotising pulmonary vasculitis. It is also classified under the spectrum of eosinophilic lung disease and as a type of pulmonary angiitis and granulomatosis. ...
Article

Pelvic congestion syndrome

Pelvic congestion syndrome (some prefer pelvic venous insufficiency 9) is a condition that results from retrograde flow through incompetent valves in ovarian veins. It is a commonly missed and potentially-treatable cause of chronic abdominopelvic pain.  Epidemiology It tends to be more common ...
Article

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type I

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN1), also known as Wermer syndrome, is an autosomal dominant genetic disease that results in proliferative lesions in multiple endocrine organs, particularly the pituitary gland, islet cells of the pancreas and parathyroid glands.  There are other multiple...
Article

Neurofibromatosis type 1

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also known as von Recklinghausen disease, is a multisystem neurocutaneous disorder, the most common phakomatosis, and a RASopathy. Additionally, it is also one of the most common inherited CNS disorders, autosomal dominant disorders and inherited tumour syndromes....
Article

Hypomelanosis of Ito

Hypomelanosis of Ito, also known as incontinentia pigmentiachromians, is the third most frequent phakomatosis, involving a wide spectrum of defects in multiple organ systems. Epidemiology The prevalence is unknown, being reported since 1 per 8000 patients in a general paediatric hospital 3 to ...
Article

Hereditary multiple exostoses

Hereditary multiple exostoses, also known as diaphyseal aclasis, is an autosomal dominant condition, characterised by the development of multiple osteochondromas. Epidemiology Hereditary multiple exostoses demonstrate an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, with incomplete penetrance in fem...
Article

Superior vena cava obstruction

Superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction can occur from extrinsic compression, intrinsic stenosis or thrombosis. Malignancies are the main cause and are considered an oncologic emergency. Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) refers to the clinical syndrome with symptoms that results from this obstruct...
Article

Large vestibular aqueduct syndrome

Large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) refers to the presence of congenital sensorineural hearing loss with an enlarged vestibular aqueduct. It is thought to be one of the most common congenital causes of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL).  Clinical presentation SNHL starts in childhood and...
Article

Guillain-Barré syndrome

Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is defined as a heterogeneous group of autoimmune polyradiculopathies, involving sensory, motor and autonomic nerves. It is the most common cause of rapidly progressive flaccid paralysis. It is believed to be one of a number of related conditions, sharing a similar ...
Article

Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome

Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome (KTWS) is a syndrome combination of capillary malformations, soft-tissue or bone hypertrophy, and varicose veins or venous malformations. It is considered an angio-osteo-hypertrophic syndrome. KTS classically comprises a triad of: port wine nevi bony or soft t...
Article

Nail-patella syndrome

Nail-patella syndrome, also known as Fong disease or osteo-onychodysostosis, is a rare autosomal dominant condition which results from symmetrical mesodermal and ectodermal abnormalities. Clinical presentation Clinically, the key feature is absent/hypoplastic nails from birth. Individuals may ...
Article

Madelung disease

Madelung disease, also known as Madelung-Launois-Bensaude syndrome or neck lipomatosis or multiple symmetric lipomatosis, is a rare benign entity clinically characterised by the presence of multiple and symmetric, non-encapsulated masses of fatty tissue, usually involving the neck and the upper ...
Article

Polycystic ovarian syndrome

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), recently referred also as hyperandrogenic anovulation, is a chronic anovulation syndrome associated with androgen excess.  The diagnosis is made on the combined clinical, biochemical and sonographic grounds. The revised 2003 ASRM/ESHRE Rotterdam consensus cri...
Article

Parinaud syndrome

Parinaud syndrome, also known as the dorsal midbrain syndrome, is a supranuclear vertical gaze disturbance caused by compression of the tectal plate. It is characterised by a classic triad of findings: upward gaze palsy, often manifesting as diplopia pupillary light-near dissociation (pupils ...
Article

Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome

Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome is caused by a mutation to either BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. These patients have an increased risk of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, these gene mutations are not the only cause of hereditary breast ca...
Article

Complex regional pain syndrome

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), also known as Sudeck atrophy, is a condition which can affect the extremities in a wide clinical spectrum. Terminology Two types of CRPS have been described 8: type 1: no underlying single nerve lesion (formerly known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy) ty...
Article

Nijmegen breakage syndrome

Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) (also known as Seemanova syndrome or Berlin breakage syndrome) is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome of chromosomal instability.  Clinical presentation Main clinical features are: microcephaly present at birth and progressive with age dysmorphic facial feat...
Article

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a cyanotic congenital cardiac anomaly where affected individuals can have profound cyanosis and cardiac failure. It is one of the commonest causes for a neonate to present with congestive cardiac failure and the 4th most frequent cardiac anomaly to mani...
Article

Antiphospholipid syndrome (pulmonary manifestations)

Pulmonary involvement in antiphospholipid syndrome is one of the most frequent arterial complications of antiphospholipid syndrome.  Pathology It is essentially related to pulmonary arterial microthrombosis and may cause a wide spectrum of conditions, which include 3-5: pulmonary thromboembol...
Article

Thanatophoric dysplasia

Thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) is a lethal skeletal dysplasia. It is the most common lethal skeletal dysplasia followed by osteogenesis imperfecta type II.  Epidemiology The estimated incidence is around 1:25,000-50,000 3. Pathology Genetics It results from a mutation coding for the fibroblas...
Article

Wernicke encephalopathy

Wernicke encephalopathy, also referred as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, is due to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency, and is typically seen in alcoholics. On imaging, it is commonly seen on MRI as areas of symmetrical increased T2/FLAIR signal involving the mammillary bodies, dorsomedial thalami, ...
Article

Klippel-Feil syndrome

Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a complex heterogeneous entity that results in cervical vertebral fusion. Two or more non-segmented cervical vertebrae are usually sufficient for diagnosis. Epidemiology There is a recognised female predilection 1. KFS has an incidence of 1:40,000-42,000 2. Clin...
Article

Congenital high airways obstruction syndrome

Congenital high airways obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) refers to a rare, often lethal, congenital laryngotracheal condition and is primarily characterised by obstruction to the fetal upper airway. Pathology CHAOS can be of three possible types 2: complete laryngeal atresia without an oesophagea...
Article

Labrune syndrome

Labrune syndrome, also known as leukoencephalopathy with calcifications and cysts, is a rare condition that consists of a triad of leukoencephalopathy, cerebral calcifications and cysts. Epidemiology Labrune syndrome is an extremely rare condition, with no more than 10 cases reported in the li...
Article

Glycogen storage disease type I

Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I), also known as von Gierke disease, is a type of glycogen storage disease where there is excess deposition of glycogen primarily in the liver, but also in the kidney and small bowel 1. Epidemiology It occurs approximately one in every 100,000 live births ...
Article

Caudal regression syndrome

Caudal regression syndrome (CRS) represents a spectrum of structural defects of the caudal region. Malformations vary from isolated partial agenesis of the coccyx to lumbosacral agenesis. Epidemiology Caudal regression syndrome is rare, with an estimated incidence of 1:7500-100,000 7,10. The ...
Article

Sturge-Weber syndrome

Sturge-Weber syndrome, or encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis, is a phakomatosis characterised by facial port wine stains and pial angiomas.  It is part of a wide spectrum of possible phenotypes included in the craniofacial arteriovenous metameric syndrome (CAMS). Epidemiology Sturge-Weber syndr...
Article

MERRF

MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy with red ragged fibres) is a rare, multisystem mitochondrial disorder.  Clinical presentation Patients usually present in late adolescence or early adulthood with 1,2,3 myoclonus epilepsy cerebellar ataxia intellectual disability vision and/or hearing loss cardi...
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Paradoxical brain herniation

Paradoxical brain herniation, also known as sinking skin flap syndrome (SSFS), is a rare and potentially fatal entity complicating decompressive craniectomy.  Pathology Atmospheric pressure exceeding intracranial pressure at the craniectomy results in displacement of the brain across various i...
Article

Brissaud-Sicard syndrome

Brissaud-Sicard syndrome is a very rare pontine stroke syndrome that involves the anterolateral and inferior pons. Clinical presentation Classically, the syndrome presents as ipsilateral facial cramps and contralateral hemiparesis 1-3. Pathology It has been postulated that the syndrome is ca...
Article

Weber syndrome

Weber syndrome is a midbrain stroke syndrome that involves the cerebral peduncle and the ipsilateral fascicles of the oculomotor nerve 1-3. Clinical presentation ipsilateral CN III palsy contralateral hemiplegia or hemiparesis Pathology It is usually caused by an ischaemic stroke, typically...
Article

Brown syndrome (orbit)

The Brown syndrome refers to an inability of a patient to perform an upward gaze while the eye is adducted due to an abnormality of the superior oblique tendon sheath complex. History and etymology It was first described by Allan Brown in 1950 1. See also Brown-Sequard syndrome
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Inferior medial pontine syndrome

Inferior medial pontine syndrome, also known as Foville syndrome, is one of the brainstem stroke syndromes occurring when there is infarction of the medial inferior aspect of the pons due to occlusion of the paramedian branches of the basilar artery 1-3. This infarction involves the following 1-...
Article

Gasperini syndrome

Gasperini syndrome is a rare pontine stroke syndrome that involves the caudal pons tegmentum. Clinical presentation Classically, the syndrome presents with 1-3: involvement of the CN V nucleus: ipsilateral facial sensory loss involvement of the CN VI nucleus: ipsilateral impaired eye abducti...
Article

Brown-Séquard syndrome

Brown-Séquard syndrome is the result of a hemicord lesion (i.e. damage or impairment to the left or right side of the spinal cord). Clinical presentation Due to some fibres crossing within the cord whilst others cross in the brainstem, the neurology is bilateral, namely 1:  ipsilateral ascen...
Article

Nothnagel syndrome

Nothnagel syndrome is a rare midbrain stroke syndrome that involves the tectum of the midbrain, including the quadrigeminal plate 1-4. Clinical presentation Classically, the syndrome involves the oculomotor nerve fascicles and superior cerebellar peduncle, leading to ipsilateral CN III palsy a...
Article

Claude syndrome

Claude syndrome is one of the brainstem stroke syndromes in which there is infarction of the dorsomedial aspect of the midbrain. Clinical presentation Clinical picture is characteristic and includes ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral upper and lower limb ataxia 1-4. Patholog...
Article

Lateral pontine syndrome

Lateral pontine syndrome, also known as Marie-Foix syndrome or Marie-Foix-Alajouanine syndrome, refers to one of the brainstem stroke syndromes of the lateral aspect of the pons. Clinical presentation There is a characteristic clinical picture from the involvement of the following pontine stru...
Article

Benedikt syndrome

Benedikt syndrome, or paramedian midbrain syndrome, is a midbrain stroke syndrome that involves the fascicles of the oculomotor nerve and the red nucleus. Clinical presentation ipsilateral CN III palsy 1-4 crossed hemiataxia 1-4 crossed choreoathetosis 1-4 Pathology It is usually caused by...
Article

Babinski-Nageotte syndrome

Babinski-Nageotte syndrome is thought to be a brainstem stroke syndrome in between that of the hemimedullary syndrome (Reinhold syndrome) and the lateral medullary syndrome (Wallenberg syndrome) 1,2.  Terminology In many texts this eponymous syndrome is incorrectly attributed to actually being...
Article

Ischiofemoral impingement

Ischiofemoral impingement refers to the impingement of soft tissues between the ischial tuberosity and lesser trochanter of the femur, primarily the quadratus femoris muscle. Narrowing of the distance between these two osseous landmarks (ischiofemoral space) predisposes for and correlates with i...
Article

Chilaiditi syndrome

Chilaiditi syndrome is the anterior interposition of the colon to the liver reaching the under-surface of the right hemidiaphragm with associated upper abdominal pain; it is one of the causes of pseudopneumoperitoneum. Colonic gas in this position may be misinterpreted as true pneumoperitoneum ...
Article

Slit ventricle syndrome

Slit ventricle syndrome is defined as the radiological appearance of slit-like ventricles on CT and MRI images in patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Mild forms are seen in adults and more severe forms are seen in children. Patients must be symptomatic to be diagnosed with slit ventricle s...
Article

Sezary syndrome

Sézary syndrome (SS) is a type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. It is sometimes considered an advanced and leukaemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Clinical presentation It is clinically characterised by an extensive erythematous rash covering most of the body as well as the presence o...
Article

Primary progressive aphasia

Primary progressive aphasia was first described in 1982 and is the umbrella term for the language-variant frontotemporal dementias associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) 3. Clinical presentation It is an insidious disorder characterised by gradual impairment of speech and lan...
Article

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), also known as Grönblad–Strandberg syndrome, is a systemic condition characterised by the degeneration of elastic fibres. It has multiorgan manifestations. Epidemiology Its prevalence is estimated to be around 1 in 25,000 9.  Clinical presentation Patients may ...
Article

Niacin deficiency

Niacin (vitamin B3) deficiency, also known as pellagra, is a multisystem disease which involves the skin, gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system.  Epidemiology It use to be widespread until the early twenty century, but after fortification of flour with niacin it was practically era...
Article

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurotoxic state that occurs secondary to the inability of the posterior circulation to autoregulate in response to acute changes in blood pressure. Hyperperfusion with resultant disruption of the blood brain barrier results in vasogenic o...
Article

Carotidynia

Carotidynia, also known as Fay syndrome, is a rare syndrome characterised by neck pain in the region of the carotid bifurcation. It was classified by the International Headache Society (IHS) in 1988 as an idiopathic neck pain syndrome associated with tenderness over the carotid bifurcation with...
Article

Organophosphate poisoning

Organophosphate poisoning is an important cause of acute neurological dysfunction and respiratory distress. Epidemiology Organophosphate poisoning is common, often as a result of suicidal ingestion (acute high-level exposure) or occupational exposure to pesticides (chronic low-level exposure) ...
Article

PHACE syndrome

PHACE syndrome, also known as cutaneous haemangioma–vascular complex syndrome or Pascual-Castroviejo type II syndrome, is a phakomatosis that comprises of: P: posterior fossa malformations (e.g. Dandy-Walker malformation) H: haemangiomas A: arterial anomalies C: coarctation of the aorta and ...
Article

Morning glory syndrome (eye)

Morning glory disc anomaly (MGDA),also known as morning glory syndrome, is a rare congenital malformation of the optic nerve which is frequently associated with midline abnormalities of the brain and skull 1. Epidemiology Morning glory disc anomaly is rare and is more commonly found in females...
Article

Metronidazole central nervous system toxicity

Metronidazole, which is used to treat a wide variety of bacterial and protozoal infections can, in exceedingly rare cases, lead to central nervous system toxicity. Epidemiology In a review of the case literature 1, affected patients range widely in age, with the peak incidence occurring in the...
Article

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type IIa

Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type IIa, also known as Sipple syndrome, accounts for most cases of MEN2 and is characterised by: pheochromocytomas: in 50% of patients, often bilateral, and can be extra-adrenal medullary thyroid cancer: 100% of patients, aggressive, and may secrete calciton...
Article

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type IIb

Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type IIb, also known as MEN type 3 (MEN3) 3 or mucosal neuroma syndrome 2, accounts for only 5% cases of MEN2 and is characterised by: pheochromocytoma(s): in 50% of patients, often bilateral, and can be extra-adrenal medullary thyroid cancer: 100% of patient...
Article

Tarsal tunnel syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome refers to an entrapment neuropathy of the tibial nerve or of its branches within the tarsal tunnel. This condition is analogous to carpal tunnel syndrome. Clinical presentation The most common symptoms are pain and paresthesia in the toes, sole, or heel and the main find...
Article

Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH or SIAD) was described in patients with lung cancer who developed hyponatraemia associated with continued urinary sodium loss. The result is often dilutional hyponatremia in which the sodium remains normal but total body fluid incre...
Article

Nelson syndrome

Nelson syndrome is a rare disorder observed in patients with Cushing disease that have undergone bilateral adrenalectomy. It involves enlargement of an existing adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary tumour, typically an adenoma, after surgical resection of the adrenal glands.  Epidemi...
Article

Osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome

Osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease that is characterised by severe osteoporosis and blindness. This disease is frequently mistaken for osteogenesis imperfecta.  Epidemiology This disease is encountered in approximately 1 in 2 million births.  Pathology T...
Article

Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis

Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OS-CS) is a clinically separate entity from osteopathia striata (Voorhoeve disease). Bony changes on their own are typically incidental and autosomal dominant, whereas OS-CS is a multisystem, X-linked dominant disorder. Epidemiology OS-CS is extremel...
Article

Rosai-Dorfman disease

Rosai-Dorfman disease, also known as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy, is a rare benign idiopathic proliferative disease that involves phagocytic histiocytes. Epidemiology The disease predominantly occurs in young adults with a mean age at presentation of 21 years. There may be...
Article

Raghib syndrome

Raghib syndrome is a rare developmental complex. It consists of: persistence of the left superior vena cava coronary sinus ostial atresia atrial septal defect It has also been associated with other congenital malformations including ventricular septal defects, enlargement of the tricuspid an...
Article

Thrombocytopenia with absent radius syndrome

Thrombocytopenia with absent radius (TAR) syndrome is primarily characterised by the following two features: fetal thrombocytopenia absent fetal radii (bilaterally) with the presence of both thumbs Epidemiology The condition is extremely rare with an estimated incidence of 0.4 per 100,000 bi...
Article

Phlegmasia cerulea dolens

Phlegmasia cerulea dolens (Greek: "inflamed blue oedema") is an uncommon complication of deep venous thrombosis, which results from extensive thrombotic occlusion of the major and collateral veins of an extremity (usually the legs). Clinical presentation It is characterised by severe pain, swe...
Article

Budd-Chiari syndrome

Budd-Chiari syndrome refers to the clinical picture that occurs when there is partial or complete hepatic venous outflow obstruction. It is characterised on imaging by ascites, caudate hypertrophy, peripheral atrophy, and prominent collateral veins.  Epidemiology Budd-Chiari syndrome is rare. ...
Article

Currarino-Silverman syndrome

Currarino-Silverman syndrome, also known as pectus carinatum type 2 deformity, is a rare disorder in which the patient has a high carinate chest deformity due to a premature fusion of the manubriosternal joint and sternal ossification centres. Congenital heart diseases have been described in mor...
Article

Anti-synthetase syndrome

Anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS) is a systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease that is characterised by inflammatory myositis, polyarthritis associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and anti-synthetase autoantibodies. Pathology ASS can result from autoantibodies to eight of the aminoacy...
Article

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection is an uncommon viral infection (<1000 cases) with the first case reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. It most commonly causes pneumonia and acute renal failure with a mortality rate of ~40%. MERS-CoV raises concern because of its sim...
Article

Pancoast syndrome

Pancoast syndrome results from involvement of the brachial plexus and sympathetic chain by a Pancoast tumour or, less commonly, from other tumours involving the superior pulmonary sulcus. The syndrome consists of: shoulder pain C8-T2 radicular pain Horner syndrome The classical syndrome is u...
Article

Hyper IgE syndrome

Hyperimmunoglobulin E (hyper IgE) syndrome (HIES), also known as Job syndrome, consists of a heterogeneous group of complex hereditary combined B- and T-cell immune deficiency diseases characterised by recurrent Staph aureus chest infections, characteristic coarse facial appearance and dental pr...
Article

HIV-associated nephropathy

HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is commonly seen in patients with HIV/AIDS and leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The diagnosis is not imaging-based and must be confirmed by renal biopsy. Epidemiology HIVAN is seen in patients at advanced stages of HIV and AIDS, but it can also be see...
Article

Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is an inherited condition which predisposes to a host of malignancies, including colorectal carcinoma. It is considered the most frequent form of hereditary colorectal cancer. Diagnosis requires evaluation using cl...
Article

Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, is a rare inherited disorder characterised by abnormal blood vessel formation in the skin, mucous membranes, and organs including the lungs, liver, and central nervous system. Epidemiology Worldwide prevale...
Article

GATA2 deficiency

GATA2 deficiency is a germ-line disease expressed as a wide spectrum of phenotypes, including monocytopenia, myelodysplasia, myeloid leukaemias, and lymphoedema. It is a rare cause of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Clinical presentation GATA2 deficiency has considerably variable clinical mani...
Article

Gerstmann syndrome

Gerstmann syndrome, also known as angular gyrus syndrome, is a dominant hemisphere stroke syndrome consisting of four components:  agraphia or dysgraphia acalculia or dyscalculia finger agnosia left-right disorientation Pure Gerstmann syndrome is said to be without aphasia. History and ety...
Article

Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease

Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease is a very rare type of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. It manifests with dementia and/or ataxia and is due to a mutation in the prion protein (PRNP) gene, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern.  History and etymology It is par...
Article

Swyer-James syndrome

Swyer-James syndrome (SJS), also known as Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome and Bret syndrome, is a rare lung condition that manifests as unilateral hemithorax lucency as a result of postinfectious obliterative bronchiolitis.  Epidemiology The condition typically follows a viral respiratory infecti...
Article

Wellens syndrome

Wellens syndrome (also referred to as LAD coronary T-wave syndrome) refers to a specific ECG abnormality in the precordial T-wave segment. It can be associated with a critical stenosis of the proximal left anterior descending artery.
Article

Medial tibial stress syndrome

Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), also known as shin splints, describes a spectrum of stress injury that occurs at the medial tibia. This term is often used to indicate any type of tibial stress injury or the earlier manifestations of a tibial stress lesion before a fracture component can be...
Article

Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome

Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome (DDMS) is a condition chararacterised by hemi cerebral atrophy/hypoplasia secondary to brain insult usually in fetal or early childhood period and is accompanied by ipsilateral compensatory osseous hypertrophy and contralateral hemiparesis. It is characterised by: ...
Article

Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome

Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES) is a severe postinfectious neurological disorder that presents with status epilepticus in a previously normal child (or less commonly adult) after a febrile illness. Terminology FIRES has received several names in the literature: acute encep...

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