Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and continuously improved upon by countless contributing members. Our dedicated editors oversee each edit for accuracy and style. Find out more about articles.

16,852 results found
Article

Segond fracture

Segond fracture is an avulsion fracture of the knee that involves the lateral aspect of the tibial plateau and is very frequently (~75% of cases) associated with disruption of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). On the frontal knee radiograph, it may be referred to as the lateral capsular sign...
Article

Avulsion fractures of the knee

Avulsion fractures of the knee are numerous due to the many ligaments and tendons inserting around this joint. They include 1: anterior cruciate ligament avulsion fracture posterior cruciate ligament avulsion fracture avulsion of the medial collateral ligament origin of MCL avulsion fracture...
Article

Ulnar artery

The ulnar artery is a terminal branch of the brachial artery, arising at the proximal aspect of the forearm. Along with the radial artery, it is one of the main arteries of the forearm.  Summary origin: terminal branch of the brachial artery location: inferior aspect of the cubital fossa sup...
Article

Radial artery

The radial artery is a terminal branch of the brachial artery and arises at the cubital fossa of the forearm. It is one of the two main arteries of the forearm, along with the ulnar artery. Summary origin: terminal branch of the brachial artery location: inferior aspect of the cubital fossa ...
Article

Radius

The radius (plural: radii) is one of the two long bones present in the forearm, located laterally in the supinated anatomical position. It has a smaller proximal end and enlarges to a larger distal end (opposite to the ulna).  Gross anatomy Osteology The proximal radius comprises the articula...
Article

Steelpan sign (sigmoid volvulus)

The steelpan sign refers to the close resemblance of sigmoid volvulus on CT to the percussion instrument known as the steelpan. The steelpan, also known as steel drum or pan, is a Caribbean musical instrument invented in Trinidad and Tobago by the mid-1930s, which became very popular in Trinidad...
Article

High division of the brachial artery

A high division of the brachial artery is an unusually proximal bifurcation of the brachial artery into its ulnar and radial branches in the upper arm. It is an anatomical variant of the arterial branching pattern of the upper limb. Description  In general, the brachial artery bifurcates into...
Article

Scaphoid

The scaphoid, also known as the os scaphoideum (or historically as the navicular), is the largest of the proximal row of carpal bones and forms the radial portion of the carpal tunnel. It is important for stability and movement at the wrist and may be fractured after a fall onto a hyperextended ...
Article

Navicular

The navicular bone is found in the midfoot and is one of the tarsal bones. Its structure resembles that of a boat. It is the last bone of the foot to ossify fully 1. Summary location: lies within the medial aspect of the midfoot relations: the talus bone, cuboid bone and the three cuneiform b...
Article

Accessory navicular

An accessory navicular is a large accessory ossicle that can be present adjacent to the medial side of the navicular bone. The tibialis posterior tendon often inserts with a broad attachment into the ossicle. Most cases are asymptomatic but in a small proportion, it may cause painful tendinosis ...
Article

Aviator astragalus

Aviator astragalus is an antiquated term for a pattern of isolated fracture-dislocation injury of the talus. Fractures included under this name include compression fractures of the talar neck, fractures of the body, posterior process or fracture-dislocation injuries. More specifically the term ...
Article

Talus

The talus (plural: tali 4), also known as the astragalus, is a tarsal bone in the hindfoot that articulates with the tibia, fibula, calcaneus, and navicular bones. It has no muscular attachments and around 60% of its surface is covered by articular cartilage.  Gross anatomy The talus has been ...
Article

Brachial artery

The brachial artery is the main supply of arterial blood to the arm, forearm, and hand.  Summary origin: continuation of axillary artery distal to teres major location: medial upper arm supply: muscles of the arm, forearm, and hand main branches: profunda brachii terminal branches: radial ...
Article

Normal upper limb imaging examples

This page lists examples of normal imaging of the upper limb, divided by region and modality. Shoulder girdle plain radiograph sternoclavicular joint: example clavicle: example, example 2, example 3 bilateral clavicle: example 1 acromioclavicular joint example 1 example 2 shoulder exam...
Article

Morquio syndrome

Morquio syndrome (in older literature it is sometimes called Morquio-Brailsford syndrome) is an autosomal recessive mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IV. Epidemiology Incidence estimated at ~1:40,000. Clinical presentation Many cases present at ~2 years of age and have normal intelligence. Cl...
Article

Müller-Weiss syndrome

Müller-Weiss syndrome, also known as Brailsford disease 3, refers to spontaneous multifactorial adult onset osteonecrosis of the navicular. This syndrome is distinct from Köhler disease, the osteonecrosis of the tarsal navicular bone that occurs in children. Epidemiology It occurs in adults be...
Article

Slip-ring (CT)

Slip-ring functions to allow the transfer of electrical information and power between a rotating device and external components. They are used in helical CT and MRI scanners among other applications; in this setting, they allow image acquisition without progressive twisting of cables as the scan...
Article

Pelvic organ prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse refers to a pathological downward herniation of various pelvic organ structures into or through the perineum. It usually results from pelvic floor weakness by impairment of various ligaments, fasciae, and muscles that support the pelvic organs. In its most severe form, it ...
Article

Rectal prolapse

A rectal prolapse is a form of pelvic organ prolapse and refers to the prolapse of the rectum into the anal canal. They can involve the entire wall of the rectum or only the mucosal layer. Epidemiology Rectal prolapse in Western populations is more common in females (M:F 1:4). In women, it is ...
Article

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder caused by the accumulation of cerebral amyloid-β (Aβ) in the tunica media and adventitia of leptomeningeal and cortical vessels of the brain. The resultant vascular fragility tends to manifest in normotensive elderly patients as lob...

Updating… Please wait.

 Unable to process the form. Check for errors and try again.

 Thank you for updating your details.