Items tagged “abdomen”

21 results found
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Anterior pararenal space

The anterior pararenal space is the portion of the retroperitoneum that lies between the posterior surface of the parietal peritoneum and the anterior reflection of the perirenal fascia. Gross anatomy It contains the duodenum (D2 and D4), pancreas and retroperitoneal segments of the ascending ...
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Ascending lumbar communicant vein

The ascending lumbar communicant vein is a communication between the left ascending lumbar vein and the left renal vein. Because of its retroperitoneal location, when dilated, it may be mistaken for a lymph node on non-contrast studies with thick collimation. The image shows the left renal vein...
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Sarcoidosis (abdominal manifestations)

Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin characterized by the formation of non-caseating granulomas. Virtually any organ system may be involved. Although less common than pulmonary and mediastinal disease, abdominal sarcoidosis can mimic more common infectious or neoplast...
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Tuberculous peritonitis

Tuberculous peritonitis is a form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis affecting the peritoneum. It is frequently seen in association with other forms of gastrointestinal tuberculosis 6. Epidemiology Tuberculosis is usually confined to the respiratory system but may involve any organ system 1. Extra...
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Accessory gallbladder

Accessory gallbladders are a rare anatomical variant occurring in 0.03% of cases (approximately 1 in 3000 people). They can arise from either the left or right hepatic ducts or both. Accessory gallbladders arise from a bifid diverticulum of the hepatic duct in the 5th or 6th week of development ...
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Ascending colon

The ascending colon is the second part of the large bowel. Gross anatomy The ascending colon is the continuation of the cecum superior to the ileocecal valve. It is secondarily retroperitoneal, although it has its own mesentery in approximately 25% of patients and is 15 cm in length 1,2. The ...
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Iliopsoas compartment

The iliopsoas compartment is an extra-retroperitoneal space that runs along the posterior aspect of the abdomen and pelvis and extends into the thigh. It should be noted that the posterior abdominal wall does not have a consensus definition and that psoas muscles are sometimes included as the p...
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Inguinal ligament

The inguinal ligament (also known as Poupart's ligament or the fallopian ligament) is a fibrous band extending from the anterior superior iliac spine to the pubic tubercle. It is an important anatomical landmark and denotes the transition of the pelvis to the lower limb. Gross anatomy The ingu...
Article

Posterior right subhepatic space

The posterior right subhepatic space (also known as the hepatorenal fossa or Morison pouch) separates the liver from the right kidney. It is a potential space that is not filled with any fluid in normal conditions. Gross anatomy The posterior right subhepatic space is a subcompartment of the s...
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Small bowel obstruction (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Small bowel obstruction (SBO) accounts for 80% of all mechanical intestinal obstruction; the remaining 20% result from large bowel obstruction. It has a mortality rate of 5.5%. Reference article This is a summary article;...
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Large bowel obstruction (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Large bowel obstruction (LBO) occurs when there is mechanical obstruction of the large bowel and is often impressive on imaging on account of the ability of the large bowel to massively distend. This condition requires prom...
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Bowel perforation (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Bowel perforation is an acute surgical emergency where there is a release of gastric or intestinal contents into the peritoneal space. Reference article This is a summary article; read more in our article on bowel perfora...
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Sigmoid volvulus vs cecal volvulus

The following points may be helpful to distinguish between sigmoid volvulus and cecal volvulus on plain film. Sigmoid volvulus arises in the pelvis (left lower quadrant) extends towards the right upper quadrant ahaustral in appearance sigmoid volvulus causes obstruction of the distal large ...
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Pediatric abdomen (AP supine view)

The AP supine abdominal radiograph is a routine view when imaging the pediatric abdomen. This view may be taken alongside the PA erect and lateral decubitus views. As radiation protection is an essential consideration in pediatrics, some departmental protocols may only perform one view (either t...
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Pediatric abdomen (lateral decubitus view)

The lateral decubitus radiograph is an additional projection for assessing the pediatric abdomen. This view is ideal for displaying free air in the abdomen and/or if the patient is unable to lie supine 1. As radiation dose is an important consideration for pediatric imaging, the lateral decubitu...
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Lacunar ligament

The lacunar ligament, also known as Gimbernat’s ligament, is a crescent-shaped ligament that extends between the inguinal ligament and pectineal ligament, close to their point of insertion to the pubic tubercle. Gross anatomy The lacunar ligament is formed by the lower border of the aponeurosi...
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Pediatric abdomen (supine cross-table lateral view)

The supine cross-table lateral view is an additional projection to demonstrate the pediatric abdomen. As radiation dose is an important consideration for pediatric imaging, the horizontal beam lateral view is not often performed; although this will vary based on the department. Indications Thi...
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Fecal impaction

Fecal impaction is the inability to spontaneously evacuate solid feces. It is common in the elderly population. A severe form of fecal impaction is often referred to as a fecaloma.  Terminology Fecal loading is a poorly defined term but generally refers to the volume of fecal material in the c...
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Rosenbach sign (hemiplegia)

Rosenbach sign or phenomenon is a clinical sign described in hemiplegia.  The sign refers to the absence of an abdominal wall skin reflex when stroking the paralyzed side of a patient; conversely on the unaffected side, the reflex is normal 1. See also Rosenbach gave his name to two other cli...
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Double beak sign

The double beak sign refers to the sudden tapering that two adjacent intestinal loops show in the internal hernia at the transition point of the closed loop obstruction. The marked reduction in caliber results in distension of the afferent and efferent intestinal loops. History and etymology I...