Items tagged “cases”

4,571 results found
Article

Trousseau syndrome

Trousseau syndrome is referred to by a number of names, such as migratory thrombophlebitis and cancer-associated thromboembolism, but is essentially the association of venous thrombosis provoked by a yet to be diagnosed malignancy.
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Earth-heart sign

The earth-heart sign is a newly recognised sign of cardiac compromise that may be seen on chest radiographs of patients with tension pneumomediastinum. The substantial pressure exerted on the heart by the gas trapped in the mediastinum with subsequent impairment of central venous return and obs...
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Resorptive (obstructive) atelectasis

Resorptive or obstructive atelectasis is a form of lung collapse that is due to obstruction of the airways supplying a lung segment or lobe. It is a term used to distinguish atelectasis identified on imaging based on the underlying pathophysiology to guide diagnosis. Pathology As the name impl...
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Pickwickian syndrome

Pickwickian syndrome, or obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS), comprises the triad of obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2), daytime hypoventilation (awake hypercapnia and hypoxemia), and sleep-disordered breathing in the absence of alternative explanations (e.g. severe parenchymal lung disease, mechanical ...
Article

Duodenitis

Duodenitis is a term given to inflammation of the duodenum. Pathology Aetiology A duodenitis can result from both intrinsic processes within the duodenum as well as from processes occuring outside the duodendum. It can occur from infective as well as non-infective inflammatory processes. Non...
Article

Milk-alkali syndrome

Milk-alkali syndrome is the combination of: hypercalcaemia renal failure metabolic alkalosis It is due to the large amounts of calcium and alkali being ingested (e.g. milk and antacids for peptic ulcer disease treatment or calcium carbonate for osteoporosis). It is a cause of medullary nephr...
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Ichikado CT scoring of acute respiratory distress syndrome

CT scoring systems have been proposed in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) to predict clinical outcomes. This scoring system was established by Ichikado et al. in 2006 2 and at the time of writing (July 2016), this is the most widely used CT scoring system. Classification...
Article

Chronic hip subluxation

Chronic hip subluxation most common occurs in paediatric patients with neuromuscular disorders (e.g. cerebral palsy). It is considered a form of developmental hip dysplasia.  Epidemiology Chronic hip subluxation occurs in ~45% of cerebral palsy patients who are not walking by 5 years of age 3....
Article

Chronic hip subluxation

Chronic hip subluxation most common occurs in paediatric patients with neuromuscular disorders (e.g. cerebral palsy). It is considered a form of developmental hip dysplasia.  Epidemiology Chronic hip subluxation occurs in ~45% of cerebral palsy patients who are not walking by 5 years of age 3....
Article

Bayonet deformity

Bayonet deformity is a term used to describe the shape of the wrist in certain conditions: Madelung deformity hereditary multiple exostosis with pseudo-Madelung deformity retarded bone growth of the distal ulna with outward bowing of the radius with distal radioulnar joint subluxation Colles...
Article

Gastric lymph node stations

Gastric lymph node stations were originally divided into 16 groups proposed by the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer in 1963. Gross anatomy The areas of stomach which drain into regional lymph nodes: cardia and proximal lesser curvature drain into left gastric lymph nodes, then int...
Article

Gastric lymph node stations

Gastric lymph node stations were originally divided into 16 groups proposed by the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer in 1963. Gross anatomy The areas of stomach which drain into regional lymph nodes: cardia and proximal lesser curvature drain into left gastric lymph nodes, then int...
Article

Hamate

The hamate is one of the carpal bones, forms part of the distal carpal row and has a characteristic hook on its volar surface. Gross anatomy Osteology The hamate has a wedge-shaped body. It bears an uncinate (unciform) hamulus (hook of hamate) which projects in a volar fashion from the dista...
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Tibia

The tibia (plural: tibiae) is the largest bone of the leg and contributes to the knee and ankle joints. (shin- or shank-bone are lay terms). It is medial to and much stronger than the fibula, exceeded in length only by the femur. Gross anatomy Osteology The tibia has a prismoid shaft, expande...
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Complex meniscal tear

Complex meniscal tears extend in more than one plane, and can in turn create separate flaps of meniscus.  Radiographic features MRI knee The mensical tear usually includes a combination of radial, horizontal, and longitudinal components (any two or all three). Often the meniscus substance app...
Article

Complex meniscal tear

Complex meniscal tears extend in more than one plane, and can in turn create separate flaps of meniscus.  Radiographic features MRI knee The mensical tear usually includes a combination of radial, horizontal, and longitudinal components (any two or all three). Often the meniscus substance app...
Article

Appendiceal carcinoid

Appendiceal carcinoids are rare overall but represent the most common tumour of the appendix. The appendix is also one of the most common (but not the most common) locations for gastrointestinal carcinoid tumours.  Clinical presentation Appendiceal carcinoids can present as the obstructive cau...
Article

Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is a form of congenital muscular dystrophy. Epidemiology FCMD is almost exclusively found in Japan where it has an incidence of 2-4 per 100,000 infants and is the second most common muscular dystrophy after Duchenne muscular dystrophy 1,2. However,...
Article

Metatarsals

The metatarsals consist of five long bones in the foot. They are numbered from 1st to 5th from the medial side of the foot to lateral. They are analogous to the metacarpals of the hand. Gross anatomy The metatarsal bones run from the tarsus, forming the tarsometatarsal joints, to the base of p...
Article

Oesophageal dysmotility

Oesophageal dysmotility refers to the pathological disruption of the normal sequential and coordinated muscle motion of the oesophagus to transport food from the oropharynx to the stomach. It is an umbrella term used to refer to the common pathophysiological endpoint of dysmotility that can be c...

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