Items tagged “chest”

20 results found
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Aberrant right subclavian artery

Aberrant right subclavian arteries (ARSA), also known as arteria lusoria, are among the commonest aortic arch anomalies.  Epidemiology The estimated incidence is 0.5-2% 1. Associations as can be expected from the embryological development of the artery, the right recurrent laryngeal nerve...
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Variant anatomy of the aortic arch

Variant anatomy of the aortic arch occurs when there is failure of normal aortic development. It results in a number of heterogenous anomalies of the aorta and its branch vessels. Gross anatomy Normally, the aorta ascends in the superior mediastinum to the level of the sternal notch before arc...
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Golden S-sign (lung lobe collapse)

The Golden S-sign is seen on both PA chest radiographs and on CT scans. It is named because this sign resembles a reverse S shape, and is therefore sometimes referred to as the reverse S-sign of Golden. Although typically seen with right upper lobe collapse, the S-sign can also be seen with the...
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Asbestos

Asbestos is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals from mixture of calcium magnesium, iron, and sodium exploited commercially for their desirable physical properties, particularly their resistance to heat and burning. They all form thin elongated fibrous crystals, and can be manufact...
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Left ventricular enlargement

Left ventricular enlargement can be the result of a number of conditions, including: pressure overload hypertension aortic stenosis volume overload aortic regurgitation mitral regurgitation wall abnormalities left ventricular aneurysm hypertrophic cardiomyopathy / dilated cardiomyopathy...
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Right paratracheal stripe

The right paratracheal stripe is a normal finding on the frontal chest x-ray and represents the right tracheal wall, adjacent pleural surfaces and any mediastinal fat between them. It is visible because of the silhouette sign created by air within the trachea medially and air within the lung lat...
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Chest x-ray lines and stripes

Chest x-ray lines and stripes are important to recognize on chest radiographs.  Lines are usually less than 1 mm in width and are comprised of tissue outlined on either side by air and typically represent pleural-covered structures within the middle and superior mediastinum 1,2: anterior junct...
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Retrosternal airspace

The retrosternal airspace is seen as a normal lucency between the posterior aspect of the sternum and anterior aspect of the ascending aorta on lateral chest radiographs. This space normally measures less than 2.5 cm in width. Increased retrosternal airspace is a sign of pulmonary emphysema, whi...
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Cardiophrenic angle lesions

The cardiophrenic space is usually filled with fat. However, lesions originating above or lower to the diaphragm can present as cardiophrenic angle lesions. The more common lesions encountered include: pericardial fat pad pericardial cyst pericardial fat necrosis Morgagni's hernia lymphade...
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Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia of the lung

Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) of the lung is a putative precursor lesion of adenocarcinoma of the lung. This entity replaces part of a spectrum of the former bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and falls under the spectrum of pre-invasive lesions of the lungs. Pathology Atypical adenomato...
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Posterior junction line

The posterior junction (or junctional) line is formed by the apposition of the pleural surfaces of the posteromedial surfaces of the upper lobes of the lungs, posteriorly to the esophagus but anterior to the thoracic spine (usually T3-T5) 1,2. Unlike the anterior junction line, the posterior jun...
Article

Shmoo sign

Shmoo sign refers to the appearance of a prominent, rounded left ventricle and dilated aorta on a plain PA chest radiograph giving the appearance of Shmoo, a fictional cartoon character in the comic strip Li'l Abner, which first appeared in 1948 5. This sign is indicative of left ventricular enl...
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Pneumomediastinum (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Pneumomediastinum describes air/gas within the mediastinum and is readily demonstrated on CT and may be seen on a chest radiograph. Reference article This is a summary article; read more in our article on pneumomediastinu...
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Endobronchial metastases (mnemonic)

Primary neoplasms which may result in endobronchial metastases may be memorized by utilizing the following mnemonic: Kiss My RBC 1  Mnemonic K: Kaposi sarcoma M: melanoma R: renal cell carcinoma B: breast cancer C: colorectal carcinoma, cervical carcinoma, carcinoid See also endobronchi...
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Pulmonary embolism (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Pulmonary embolism refers to occlusion of the pulmonary arteries or its branches, usually via venous thrombus. Reference article This is a summary article; read more in our article on pulmonary embolism. Summary epidemi...
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Lung cancer (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and non-radiologists Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and refers to malignancy originating in the airways or pulmonary parenchyma. Clinical presentation Patients may be asymptomatic until locally advanced or metastatic disease. The m...
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Chest x-ray: lines and tubes (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Chest x-ray lines and tubes can be easily assessed and should be the first thing that you look at when reviewing a chest x-ray. Assessment of their position is important, but they also give you an idea about how sick the pa...
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Thoracic spine sign (ultrasound)

The thoracic spine sign, or spine sign, on lung ultrasound is an indirect indicator of the presence of a pleural effusion or hemothorax. It represents the visualization of the vertebral bodies in the thoracic cavity above the diaphragm which are usually not seen unless there is a fluid collectio...
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Apical chest mass

Apical chest masses are often important and may be missed, especially when examined with a plain chest radiograph. It is always recommended to perform a targeted assessment of the apices of the lungs during a chest x-ray; they are one of the classic review areas. Pathology Etiology Commonly a...
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Bilateral hypertranslucent hemithoraces

Bilateral hypertranslucent hemithoraces is the presence of decreased density of the hemithoraces bilaterally on a plain chest radiograph. This hypertranslucency, a.k.a. hyperlucency, may be focal or diffuse 1.  Also see unilateral hypertranslucent hemithorax.  Focal pulmonary bullae localize...