Items tagged “pulmonary embolism”

10 results found
Article

Hampton hump

Hampton hump refers to a dome-shaped, pleural-based opacification in the lung most commonly due to pulmonary embolism and lung infarction (it can also result from other causes of pulmonary infarction (e.g. vascular occlusion due to angioinvasive aspergillosis). Although uncommon, it can be seen...
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Knuckle sign (pulmonary embolism)

The knuckle sign refers to the abrupt tapering or cutoff of a pulmonary artery secondary to a pulmonary embolus (PE). It is better visualized on CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) than chest x-ray. This is an important ancillary finding in pulmonary embolism, and often associated with the Fleischne...
Article

Geneva score

The Geneva score is a clinical decision rule used to estimate the pre-test probability of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients in which this diagnosis was considered. The criteria were originally published by the clinical team of the Geneva University Hospital in 2001 1, and revised and simplifie...
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Wells criteria for pulmonary embolism

The Wells criteria for pulmonary embolism is a risk stratification score and clinical decision rule to estimate the probability for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients in which history and examination suggests acute PE is a diagnostic possibility. It provides a pre-test probability which, ...
Article

Massive pulmonary embolism

A massive pulmonary embolism (PE) represents the most severe manifestation of venous thromboembolic disease when classified on a continuum of hemodynamic derangement. Diagnostic criteria Massive PE is usually characterized by an acute pulmonary embolism accompanied by one or more of the follo...
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McConnell's sign (echocardiography)

The McConnell's sign describes a regional pattern of acute right ventricular dysfunction on transthoracic echocardiography first observed in a cohort of patients with acute pulmonary thromboembolism. In contrast to the global wall motion abnormalities observed in chronic right ventricular dysfun...
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60/60 sign (echocardiography)

The 60/60 sign in echocardiography refers to the coexistence of a truncated right ventricular outflow tract acceleration time (AT <60 ms) with a pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) of less than 60 mmHg (but more than 30 mmHg). In the presence of right ventricular failure, it is consisten...
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Mercury embolism

Mercury embolism ​is a rare condition caused by the embolism of elemental mercury secondary to suicidal or accidental intravenous injection 1,4. Pathology Etiology Mercury embolism is primarily from intravenous injection of elemental mercury although it has rarely been seen secondary to inges...
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Years criteria for pulmonary embolism

The YEARS criteria is a diagnostic algorithm that determines the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) derived from three items in the Wells score that are most predictive of PE1. Unlike the Wells score, it uses a variable D-dimer threshold based off clinical pre-test probability. The YEARS criteria i...
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N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate pulmonary embolism

N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate pulmonary embolism is a potentially life-threatening complication that can arise following the use of the tissue glue, butyl-cyanoacrylate, for endoscopic sclerotherapy to treat variceal bleeding. Epidemiology Sclerosis with biological glue (butyl cyanoacrylate) is curr...