Items tagged “style guide”

33 results found
Article

References

References are essential to the pursuit of the high academic standards we are aiming for at Radiopaedia.org.  Reference ideals each article should have at least 3-4 references all reference material should be cited in the reference section references should be sought in the following order o...
Article

Style guide and help

Our style guide is a set of guidelines to help authors write content in a uniform way. This has become increasingly important as the number of contributors has grown. Take a look through the guide and get involved at Radiopaedia.org. general overview of Radiopaedia.org what Radiopaedia.org IS ...
Article

Articles

Articles form the encyclopaedic component of Radiopaedia.org and are collaborative efforts to create atomic reference articles for anything related to the practice of radiology. Unlike a textbook, journal publication or a written encyclopaedia, Radiopaedia.org articles allow you and other users ...
Article

Spelling and punctuation

Although Radiopaedia.org initially favoured the use of British spelling, e.g. "haemorrhage" rather than "hemorrhage", it has been decided that it is silly and pointless to argue over such things.  Several of our current editors favour British spelling, but it is accepted that we will have a mix...
Article

General overview of Radiopaedia.org

Radiopaedia.org is a rapidly growing open-edit radiology resource primarily compiled by radiologists and radiology residents/registrars and fellows from across the globe. The site aims to create the best radiology reference available, and to make it available for free, forever and for all. It i...
Article

Interventional procedure article structure

Interventional articles necessarily require a different structure to other articles. It is important for them to have a consistent structure to maintain uniformity across the site. The suggested structure and headings (and heading size) are as follows: ==========================================...
Article

Why upload cases to Radiopaedia.org

Radiopaedia.org is more than just an amazing collaborative resource, it is also the perfect place to keep your case library.  Here are a few reasons why you should upload your cases to Radiopaedia.org: free registration unlimited storage capacity for all your cases support for scrollable sta...
Article

When to use bold

Making a decision about when to use bold in an article is important since we know that adding bold and italics to articles reduces its readability. There are very few examples of when to use bold in an article on Radiopaedia.org and as such, if you're unsure, it's probably worthwhile not using ...
Article

Case title

Each case should have a case title which can be entered in its dedicated box. The case title is best labelled as just the diagnosis of the case: Hepatoma NOT Interesting case of a patient with hepatoma Pathologically proven hepatoma (this should be included in the case description) Capitali...
Article

Study findings (cases)

The study findings section of cases is where the findings of that particular study are described. This section is located below each study.  Currently, both the study (findings) and each series (image/stack specific findings) can have descriptions. The former is mandatory and the second is not ...
Article

Case description

A case description has two components: clinical presentation case discussion Clinical presentation This refers to the clinical information you should write as part of your case which can include relevant past history and laboratory studies. It is included in the field immediately below the c...
Article

Bullet points in radiographic appearances

Bullet points in radiographic appearances have an important part to play, particularly where there are multiple series, e.g. MRI. When listing MRI appearances, use a new bullet for each sequence and embolden the sequence name. If the sequence name has indented bullets below it, do not add a tra...
Article

Using e.g.

Using e.g. in Radiopaedia.org articles is common and good practice. However, it is important to use e.g. consistently across the site. Standard use It should be remembered that when using e.g., the user is trying to give an example, not an exhaustive list.  Example There are many causes of m...
Article

Style guide

Our style guide is a set of articles that outline the basic "rules" about how to write content on Radiopaedia.org.  Hopefully, you already know that content at Radiopaedia.org consists of articles and cases.  Style Our writing style is similar to scientific journals with the majority of conte...
Article

Mnemonics article structure

Mnemonics articles are a special type of article with specific style requirements. The title of the article should: relate to the topic that the mnemonic relates to, not the actual mnemonic, e.g. Salter-Harris classification, not SALTR relate to the specifics of the mnemonic, e.g. branches of...
Article

Non-English articles

Radiopaedia.org is at present only accepting articles in English.  One day, we'd love to have the site translated into many languages, but for now, we are simply not able to provide enough editorial control over contributions that are not written in English. If your first language is not Engli...
Article

Slash

A slash is used mainly as a substitute for the word 'or'. Radiopaedia.org follows standard English style with no space either preceding or following a slash. A slash is often used to avoid indicating a preference for one of the terms on either side of the slash.  When either of the separated it...
Article

Practical points (article structure)

Practical points is a special part of some articles. It is a section to highlight key features of the condition being discussed, which aid in diagnosis or interpretation (pearls) as well as some of the mistakes to be avoided (pitfalls). When present, it is one of the main subheadings. Location ...
Article

Pathology (article structure)

Pathology is one of the main subheadings in a standard article.  Location The "Pathology" subheading is located after "Clinical presentation" and before "Radiographic features". Structure Immediately under the "Pathology" subheading a brief introduction to the relevant pathology of the condi...
Article

Differential diagnosis (article structure)

Differential diagnosis is one of the main subheadings in a standard article.  Location The "Differential diagnosis" subheading is located after "History and etymology" and before "Practical points". Structure The differential diagnosis section is best structured as a bullet point list with a...

Updating… Please wait.
Loadinganimation

Alert accept

Error Unable to process the form. Check for errors and try again.

Alert accept Thank you for updating your details.