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Items tagged “style guide”

41 results found
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References

References are essential to the pursuit of the high academic standards we are aiming for at Radiopaedia.org.  Dos  each article should have at least 3-4 references cases may also often have references, and when used the style should follow as for articles, including assigning ascending number...
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Articles

Articles form the encyclopedic component of Radiopaedia.org and are collaborative efforts to create atomic reference articles for anything related to the practice of radiology. Unlike a textbook, journal publication or a written encyclopedia, Radiopaedia.org articles allow you and other users to...
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Spelling (general)

Correct spelling is crucial to ensuring that the site is easy to read and trusted. There are a number of troublesome examples that are either frequently written incorrectly, misunderstood or where multiple forms are accepted. In the latter case, we just need to choose one form for the sake of un...
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General overview of Radiopaedia.org

Radiopaedia.org is a rapidly growing open-edit radiology resource primarily compiled by radiologists and radiology residents/registrars and fellows from across the globe. The site aims to create the best radiology reference available, and to make it available for free, forever and for all. It i...
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Interventional procedure article structure

Interventional procedure articles necessarily require a different structure to other articles. It is important for them to have a consistent structure to maintain uniformity across the site. The suggested structure and headings (and heading size) are as follows: ================================...
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Why upload cases to Radiopaedia.org

Radiopaedia.org is more than just a collaborative resource, it is also the perfect place to keep your case library. Best of all, your cases help your colleagues from all over the world learn on their own and teach each other.  Your cases remain yours, but you can share them with the rest of the...
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When to use bold

Making a decision about when to use bold in an article is important since we know that adding bold and italics to articles reduces its readability. There are very few examples of when to use bold in an article on Radiopaedia.org and as such, if you're unsure, it's probably worthwhile not using ...
Article

Case title

Each case should have a case title which can be entered in its dedicated box - a clear and concise case title is vital to having the educational case library well organized and easy to navigate.  Format The case title is best labeled as just the diagnosis of the case: Hepatoma NOT Interesti...
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Findings (cases)

The findings section of cases is where the description of that particular study is described. This section is located immediately below each study and findings contribute to case completeness. What it should contain The findings section should contain a description of the whole study that shou...
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Case discussion

Case discussion refers to relevant teaching points and imaging features relating to your particular case (but not of that particular condition); this section is below your images and you can link related articles into this section.  If you are struggling to write a case discussion remember it c...
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Bullet points in radiographic appearances

Bullet points in radiographic appearances have an important part to play, particularly where there are multiple series, e.g. MRI. When listing MRI appearances, use a new bullet for each sequence and embolden the sequence name. If the sequence name has indented bullets below it, do not add a tra...
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Using e.g.

Using e.g. in Radiopaedia.org articles is common and good practice. However, it is important to use e.g. consistently across the site. Standard use It should be remembered that when using e.g., the user is trying to give an example, not an exhaustive list.  Example There are many causes of m...
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Style guide

Our style guide is a set of articles that outline the basic "rules" about how to write content on Radiopaedia.org.  Hopefully, you already know that content at Radiopaedia.org consists of articles and cases.  Style Our writing style is similar to scientific journals with the majority of conte...
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Mnemonics article structure

Mnemonics articles are a special type of article with specific style requirements outlined below.  ======================================================================= Acceptable mnemonics Mnemonics have a long tradition in the teaching of medicine and many of the most memorable ones are a...
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Non-English articles

Radiopaedia.org is at present only accepting articles in English.  One day, we'd love to have the site translated into many languages, but for now, we are simply not able to provide enough editorial control over contributions that are not written in English. If your first language is not Engli...
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Slash

A slash (the forward slash in English is formally called the solidus) is used mainly as a substitute for the word 'or'. Radiopaedia.org follows standard English style with no space either preceding or following a slash. A slash is often used to avoid indicating a preference for one of the terms ...
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Practical points (article structure)

Practical points is a special part of some articles. It is a section to highlight key features of the condition being discussed, which aid in diagnosis or interpretation (pearls) as well as some of the mistakes to be avoided (pitfalls). When present, it is one of the main subheadings. Location ...
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Differential diagnosis (article structure)

Differential diagnosis is one of the main subheadings in a standard article.  Location The "Differential diagnosis" subheading is located after "History and etymology" and before "Practical points". Structure This section should be considered to be a radiological differential diagnosis unles...
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Reviewing edits

Reviewing edits on Radiopaedia is paramount to ensuring that our content is relevant and of high quality. This page is mostly useful for editors of the site but may be helpful for general users to gain an insight into what happens behind the scenes at Radiopaedia. Edits Whenever an edit is ma...
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Names

Using names on Radiopaedia.org is common when describing procedures and the history surrounding eponymous names. When referring to a person, do not use punctuation in their title or name and use spaces between initials. For example: Dr R F Player (correct) Dr. R F Player (incorrect) Dr. R. F...

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