Items tagged “vascular”

58 results found
Article

Asymmetrically large jugular bulb

Asymmetrically large jugular bulbs are entirely normal and asymptomatic; its only significance is to distinguish it from pathology. The size of the jugular bulbs is variable, with the right side being significantly larger than the left in two-thirds of people. A normal but large bulb will have...
Article

Dehiscent jugular bulb

Dehiscent jugular bulbs are present when the sigmoid plate between a high riding jugular bulb and the middle ear is absent, allowing the wall of the jugular bulb to bulge into the middle ear cavity. Epidemiology The estimated incidence may be around 3.5-7 % of the symptomatic population (e.g. ...
Article

PHACE syndrome

PHACE syndrome, also known as cutaneous haemangioma–vascular complex syndrome or Pascual-Castroviejo type II syndrome, is a phakomatosis that comprises of: P: posterior fossa malformations (e.g. Dandy-Walker malformation) H: haemangiomas A: arterial anomalies C: coarctation of the aorta and ...
Article

Tumour thrombus

Tumour thrombus is defined as tumour demonstrated within a vessel, typically a vein.  This phenomenon is classically associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC), where tumour may invade the renal vein and migrating proximally where it can reach the right atrium. Tumour thrombus is usually composed of ...
Article

High riding jugular bulb

A high riding jugular bulb is distinguished from an asymmetrically large jugular bulb by its dome (roof) reaching above the internal acoustic meatus (IAM). It need not be larger than the contralateral bulb, but usually is. A run of the mill high riding jugular bulb has an intact sigmoid plate -...
Article

Pseudo vein sign (bowel)

The pseudo vein sign can occur with active gastrointestinal bleeding where contrast extravasation during angiography may have a curvilinear appearance as it pools in the gastric rugae or mucosal folds of bowel, mimicking the appearance of a vein. However, contrast in the “pseudo-vein” persists b...
Article

Aortoiliac occlusive disease

Aortoiliac occlusive disease refers to complete occlusion of the aorta distal to the renal arteries. Terminology When the clinical triad of impotence, pelvis and thigh claudication, and absence of the femoral pulses are present, it may also be called Leriche syndrome, which usually affects you...
Article

Fibrinous pericarditis

Fibrinous pericarditis results from fine granular roughening of the pericardium. Clinical presentation Pericardial friction rub may be heard. Pathology Causes viral acute idiopathic tuberculosis pyogenic acute rheumatic fever myocardial infarction: Dressler syndrome chronic renal fail...
Article

Musculoskeletal haemangiopericytoma

Musculoskeletal haemangiopericytomas are now considered to be a cellular and more aggressive version of solitary fibrous tumours, and the term has largely been abandoned.  Epidemiology These tumours are most frequently seen in middle-aged adults (~ 4th decade). Pathology Location Typically ...
Article

Musculoskeletal haemangiopericytoma

Musculoskeletal haemangiopericytomas are now considered to be a cellular and more aggressive version of solitary fibrous tumours, and the term has largely been abandoned.  Epidemiology These tumours are most frequently seen in middle-aged adults (~ 4th decade). Pathology Location Typically ...
Article

Pericardial calcification

Pericardial calcification (PC) usually occurs in patients with a history of pericarditis.  Pathology Causes uraemia previous trauma or prior pericarditis later sequelae of rheumatic heart disease malignant pericardial involvement (e.g. mediastinal teratoma) On chest radiography, location ...
Article

Vascular anatomical variants

Aorta variants Thoracic aorta Ascending aorta Aortic arch Descending aorta Abdominal SVC & IVC - variants Intracranial arteries - variants
Case

Mitral annular calcification

 Diagnosis certain
Dr Jeremy Jones
Published 07 May 2008
91% complete
X-rayPhoto
Article

Portosystemic collateral pathways

Portosystemic collateral pathways (also called varices) develop spontaneously via dilatation of pre-existing anastomoses between the portal and systemic venous systems. This facilitates shunting of blood away from the liver into the systemic venous system in portal hypertension, as a means for r...
Article

Accessory right inferior hepatic vein

An accessory right inferior hepatic vein is the most common variation of the hepatic veins.  It is present in up to 48% of the population and drains the posterior part of the right lobe (mainly segments 6 and 7) directly into the inferior vena cava. Variations in hepatic vascular anatomy are pa...
Article

Recurrent artery of Heubner

Recurrent artery of Heubner, also known as the medial striate artery or long central artery, is the largest perforating branch from the proximal anterior cerebral artery (ACA), and is the only one routinely seen on angiography. Gross anatomy Origin and course Its origin is near the A1-ACOM-A2...
Article

Aorta

The aorta, the great artery, is the largest artery of the human body and carries oxygenated blood ejected from the left ventricle to the systemic circulation. It is divided into: thoracic aorta ascending aorta aortic arch descending aorta abdominal aorta It has branches from each section a...
Article

Moyamoya disease

Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic, non inflammatory, non atherosclerotic progressive vasculo-occlusive disease involving the circle of Willis, typically the supraclinoid internal carotid arteries.  Terminology The term moyamoya disease should be reserved for an idiopathic, sometimes familial, ...
Article

Mitral annular calcification

Mitral annular calcification (MAC) refers to deposition of calcium (along with lipid) in the annular fibrosa of the mitral valve. Epidemiology Annular calcification is seen in up to 35% of elderly patients. It is common in females over 65 years, in those with myxtomatous degeneration of the mi...
Article

Cerebral vascular malformations

Vascular malformations of the central nervous system can be divided, as they can elsewhere, into high and low flow malformations. High flow arteriovenous malformation (AVM) cerebral AVM (pial/parenchymal AVM) cerebral proliferative angiopathy dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) pial arteri...

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