Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

456 results found
Article

2001 WHO classification of hepatic hydatid cysts

The 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of hepatic hydatid cysts is used to assess the stage of hepatic hydatid cyst on ultrasound and is useful for deciding on its appropriate management, depending on the stage of the cyst. This classification was proposed by the WHO in 2001 and...
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5-F risk factors for cholelithiasis (mnemonic)

The 5-F rule refers to risk factors for the development of cholelithiasis in an event of upper abdominal pain: fair: more prevalent in Caucasian population 1 fat: BMI >30 female gender fertile: one or more children forty: age ≥40 cholelithiasis can occur in young patients with a positive f...
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AAST injury scoring scales

The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) injury scoring scales are the most widely accepted and used system of classifying and categorising traumatic injuries. Injury grade reflects severity, guides management, and aids in prognosis. At the time of writing (mid 2016), 32 differe...
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AAST liver injury scale

The 1994 revision of the AAST (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma) liver injury scale is the most widely used liver injury grading system at the time of writing (late 2016).  Classification grade I haematoma: subcapsular, <10% surface area laceration: capsular tear, <1 cm  parenc...
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Abdominal radiology for students (curriculum)

Abdominal radiology curriculum for medical students is broadly split into content that refers to imaging (the test and findings) and conditions that are considered key for this stage of training. Some non-abdominal conditions are included in this portion of the curriculum, including breast dise...
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Abdominal radiology: presentations (curriculum)

Abdominal radiology presentations are a relatively distinct group of presentations that precipitate assessment medical and surgical teams.
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Abdominal surface anatomy

The abdomen, when looking from in front, is divided into nine regions by imaginary planes (two vertical and two horizontal) forming abdominal surface anatomy. The nine regions are of clinical importance when examining and describing pathologies related to the abdomen. The horizontal planes are o...
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Abernethy malformation

Abernethy malformations are rare vascular anomalies of the splanchnic venous system. They consist of congenital portosystemic shunts and result from persistence of the embryonic vessels.  Epidemiology Type I malformations are thought to occur only in females, while type II have a male predomin...
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Abscess

Abscesses are focal confined collections of suppurative inflammatory material and can be thought of as having three components 1: a central core comprised of necrotic inflammatory cells and local tissue peripheral halo of viable neutrophils surrounded by a 'capsule' with dilated blood vessels...
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Accessory gallbladder

Accessory gallbladders are a rare anatomical variant occurring in 0.03% of cases (approximately 1 in 3000 people). They can arise from either the left or right hepatic ducts or both. Accessory gallbladders arise from a bifid diverticulum of the hepatic duct in the 5th or 6th week of development ...
Article

Accessory right inferior hepatic vein

An accessory right inferior hepatic vein is the most common variation of the hepatic veins.  It is present in up to 48% of the population and drains the posterior part of the right lobe (mainly segments 6 and 7) directly into the inferior vena cava. Variations in hepatic vascular anatomy are pa...
Article

Acquired hepatocerebral degeneration

Acquired hepatocerebral degeneration is an uncommon irreversible extrapyramidal neurodegenerative condition encountered in patients with cirrhotic chronic liver disease, resulting in widespread cerebral, basal ganglia and cerebellar damage.  Terminology Acquired hepatocerebral degeneration is ...
Article

Acute acalculous cholecystitis

Acute acalculous cholecystitis refers to the development of cholecystitis in a gallbladder either without gallstones or with gallstones where they are not the contributory factor. It is thought to occur most often due to biliary stasis and/or gallbladder ischaemia. Epidemiology Acute acalculou...
Article

Acute cholangitis

Acute cholangitis, or ascending cholangitis, is a form of cholangitis and refers to the acute bacterial infection of the biliary tree. It is a condition with high mortality that necessitates emergent biliary decompression.  Clinical presentation The classical presentation is the Charcot triad ...
Article

Acute cholecystitis

Acute cholecystitis refers to the acute inflammation of the gallbladder. It is the primary complication of cholelithiasis and the most common cause of acute pain in the right upper quadrant (RUQ). Clinical presentation Constant right upper quadrant pain that can radiate to the right shoulder. ...
Article

Acute cholecystitis (summary)

Acute cholecystitis refers to the acute inflammation of the gallbladder. It is the primary complication of cholelithiasis and the most common cause of acute pain in the right upper quadrant (RUQ). Reference article This is a summary article; read more in our article on acute cholecystitis. Su...
Article

Acute fatty liver of pregnancy

Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is a rare pregnancy-associated condition that tends to manifest in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy or early postpartum period. Epidemiology The estimated incidence is at around 1:7000-20,000 births.  Clinical presentation Patients may present with nausea,...
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Acute hepatitis

Acute hepatitis occurs when the liver suffers an injury with a resulting inflammatory reaction. The cause of the injury can occur in multiple different ways, and imaging findings are often non-specific. Ultrasound and MRI may be useful imaging modalities to suggest the diagnosis, but often the d...
Article

Acute liver failure

Acute liver failure (ALF), or fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), refers to sudden severe liver dysfunction from injury without underlying chronic liver disease (CLD), although sometimes ALF presents as decompensation of an unknown CLD.  Epidemiology ALF is rare, with < 1 case per 100,000 in the ...
Article

Acute necrotic collection

Acute necrotic collections (ANCs) are an early, local complication of necrotising pancreatitis. Terminology The following are the latest terms according to the updated Atlanta classification to describe fluid collections associated with acute pancreatitis 1,2: fluid collections in interstitia...
Article

Acute pancreatitis

Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas and is a potentially life-threatening condition. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is made by fulfilling two of the following three criteria 8: acute onset of persistent, severe epigastric pain (i.e. pain consistent with acute pancr...
Article

Acute pancreatitis (summary)

Acute pancreatitis refers to acute inflammation of the pancreas and is a potentially life-threatening condition. Reference article This is a summary article; read more in our article on acute pancreatitis. Summary epidemiology epidemiology is dependent on the cause of pancreatitis gallston...
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Acute peripancreatic fluid collection

Acute peripancreatic fluid collections (APFC) are an early complication of acute pancreatitis that usually develop in the first four weeks. After four weeks, the term pseudocysts is used. The absence of necrosis differentiates APFCs from acute necrotic collections (ANC), that is, APFCs occur in ...
Article

AFP elevation

Human alpha fetoprotein (AFP) elevation may occur in a vast number of conditions: liver tumours (hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatoblastoma) <10 ng/ml is within normal limits >20 ng/ml is above normal limits but has low specificity for tumor since it may occur in a setting of diffuse liver inju...
Article

Agenesis of the left hepatic lobe

Agenesis of the left hepatic lobe is a rare variation in liver anatomy. It is clinically asymptomatic and discovered during imaging or surgery. Radiographic features absence of the left hepatic lobe (left of the falciform ligament, Couinaud segments II and III) absence of left hepatic artery,...
Article

Agenesis of the right hepatic lobe

Agenesis of the right hepatic lobe is a rare variation in liver anatomy. Radiographic features absence of the right hepatic lobe absence of right hepatic artery, right portal vein, and right hepatic biliary system compensatory hypertrophy of the left hepatic lobe and caudate lobe possible r...
Article

AIDS cholangiopathy

AIDS cholangiopathy refers to an acalculous, secondary opportunistic cholangitis that occurs in AIDS patients as a result of immunosuppression.  Pathology Characterised by multiple irregular strictures essentially indistinguishable from primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). There are four path...
Article

Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency is a hereditary metabolic disorder and is the most common genetic cause of emphysema and metabolic liver disease in children. It results in the unopposed action of neutrophil elastase and subsequent severe basal pan lobular emphysema and respiratory symptoms...
Article

Amiodarone hepatotoxicity

Amiodarone hepatotoxicity is one of the complications that can occur with amiodarone therapy.  Clinical presentation In the majority of patients, it is discovered incidentally during routine testing of liver biochemistry and rarely do the hepatic effects develop into symptomatic liver injury o...
Article

Amoebic hepatic abscess

Amoebic hepatic abscesses are a form of hepatic abscess resulting from Entamoeba histolytica infection. Clinical presentation Patients may experience general malaise or present with frank sepsis and right upper quadrant pain. Although the causative pathogen is found worldwide, it is endemic to...
Article

Ampulla of Vater

The ampulla of Vater is a conical structure at the confluence of the common bile duct (CBD) and the main pancreatic duct that protrudes at the major duodenal papilla into the medial aspect of the descending duodenum. The entire structure is encased by smooth muscle fibers that compose the sphinc...
Article

Ampullary tumour

The term ampullary tumour generally refers to either benign or malignant neoplasms that arise from the glandular epithelium of the ampulla of Vater, including 1: ampullary adenoma (adenoma of ampulla of Vater) ampullary carcinoma (carcinoma of ampulla of Vater) According to some authors, ampu...
Article

Anatomy curriculum

The anatomy curriculum is one of our curriculum articles and aims to be a collection of articles that represent the core anatomy knowledge. General anatomy Neuroanatomy Head and neck anatomy Thoracic anatomy Abdominal and pelvic anatomy Spinal anatomy Lower limb anatomy Upper limb anato...
Article

Aneurysms of the portal venous system

Aneurysms of the portal vein are extremely rare and represent only 3% of all aneurysms of the venous system 1. Clinical presentation Most patients are asymptomatic but may present with nonspecific abdominal pain as a major symptom 2-4. Pathology Both congenital and acquired causes have been ...
Article

Anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction

An anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction describes the abnormal junction of the pancreatic duct and common bile duct that occurs outside the duodenal wall to form a long common channel (> 15 mm). The anomalous junction is often associated with a choledochal cyst or a biliary tract carcinoma and...
Article

Ansa pancreatica

The ansa pancreatica is a rare type of anatomical variation of the pancreatic duct. It is a communication between the main pancreatic duct (of Wirsung) and the accessory pancreatic duct (of Santorini). Recently, the ansa pancreatica has been considered as a predisposing factor in patients with i...
Article

Ascites

Ascites is defined as an abnormal amount of intraperitoneal fluid. Clinical presentation Patients with large volume of ascites can present with abdominal distension (which may be painful), nausea, vomiting, dyspnoea and peripheral oedema 7, 9. Pathology Ascitic fluid is traditionally charact...
Article

Atoll sign

The atoll sign in radiology can refer to: reverse halo sign (atoll in thoracic CT) atoll sign in liver MRI: suggestive of an inflammatory hepatic adenoma
Article

Atoll sign (liver MRI)

The atoll sign in hepatic imaging has been described when a liver lesion shows a peripheral rim of high T2 signal intensity with the center of the lesion appearing isointense to the background of non-cirrhotic liver on T2WI mimicking an atoll. It is considered a characteristic sign of an inflamm...
Article

Autoimmune hepatitis

Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare type of chronic hepatitis, currently classified as "type 1" or "type 2". It may eventually lead to cirrhosis. The role of imaging is primarily to exclude other diagnoses and evaluate for complications. Epidemiology It may occur in children or adults, but most pat...
Article

Autoimmune pancreatitis (diagnostic criteria)

There are several sets of diagnostic criteria for autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), with some overlap and contradictions. At the time of writing (July 2016), these are the most widely used sets of diagnostic criteria. Asian 2008 AIP diagnostic criteria both criteria I to be fulfilled one criter...
Article

Autosplenectomy

Autosplenectomy denotes spontaneous infarction of the spleen with resulting hyposplenism. Epidemiology Autosplenectomy is most frequently encountered in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease, although it has also been reported in pneumococcal septicaemia 1, and SLE 2. The demographics t...
Article

Bacillary angiomatosis

Bacillary angiomatosis is an infective complication in those with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) 3. Amongst other widespread multi-organ manifestations, the infection causes skin lesions which can be similar to those of Kaposi sarcoma. Pathology Characterised by a non-neoplastic...
Article

Balthazar score

The Balthazar score is a subscore within the CT severity index (CTSI) for grading of acute pancreatitis.  The CTSI sums two scores: Balthazar score: grading of pancreatitis (A-E) grading the extent of pancreatic necrosis The Balthazar score was originally used alone, but the addition of a sc...
Article

Beaver tail liver

Beaver tail liver, also known as a sliver of liver, is a variant of hepatic morphology where an elongated left liver lobe extends laterally to contact and often surround the spleen. It is more common in females. The parenchyma is normal and thereby has the same risks of hepatic pathology as the ...
Article

Benign liver tumours (paediatric)

Paediatric benign liver tumours are a relatively rare, but important group of conditions. Importantly, the commonest cause of a benign liver tumour is specific to the paediatric population. The list in descending order of frequency is: infantile haemangioendothelioma mesenchymal hamartoma of t...
Article

Benign tumours and tumour-like lesions of the gallbladder

The gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts play host to a surprisingly large number of benign tumours and tumour-like lesions which may be visible on imaging. In the gallbladder, most of them are detected incidentally, whereas in the bile ducts they are usually found in symptomatic patients (ob...
Article

Benign vs. malignant features of gallbladder polyps

In most instances predicting histology of a gallbladder polyp based purely on imaging is not possible. A number of features are however helpful in helping to decide management of a polypoid lesion of the gallbladder. Benign features size polyps that are less than 5 mm in size are almost alway...
Article

Beta catenin mutated hepatic adenoma

Beta catenin mutated hepatic adenomas are a genetic and pathologic subtype of hepatic adenoma. Their appearance and prognosis are different than other subtypes. Epidemiology They are the least common subtype of hepatic adenoma (10-15%). They occur more frequently in men and are associated with...
Article

Bile duct dilatation (differential)

Bile duct dilatation can be due to several aetiologies. Clinical presentation Variable, depending on underlying cause, but usually: right upper quadrant pain jaundice Radiographic features Ultrasound Harmonic imaging is useful when assessing the biliary system, as it improves the clarity ...
Article

Bile duct stricture

Bile duct strictures are problematic in terms of management and distinction between benign and malignant. Pathology Aetiology There are numerous causes of biliary duct strictures, including 1,2 : malignant cholangiocarcinoma involvement by pancreatic head adenocarcinoma involvement by am...
Article

Bile duct wall thickening (differential)

Bile duct wall thickening can occur from a number of etiologies. Radiographic features Ultrasound bile duct wall thickening bile duct walls are typically not visible when normal possible narrowing of the ducts with obstruction possible secondary signs of cholangitis, including debris in th...
Article

Bile sump syndrome

The bile sump syndrome refers to a complication occurring in ~1% of patients following a side-to-side choledochoduodenostomy, a procedure where communication is formed between the mid common bile duct and duodenum to prevent recurrent choledocholithiasis or biliary obstruction.  The syndrome occ...
Article

Biliary ascariasis

Ascariasis is the commonest helminthic infection world wide and estimated to affect nearly 1 billion people (25% of population). The disease is transmitted by Ascaris lumbricoides which belongs to the nematode family (roundworms). Life cycle Infection occurs by ingestion of contaminated food (...
Article

Biliary atresia

Biliary atresia (BA) is a congenital biliary disorder, which is characterised by an absence or severe deficiency of the extrahepatic biliary tree. It is one of the most common causes of neonatal cholestasis, often causing cirrhosis immediately and leading to death and accounts for over half of c...
Article

Biliary cystadenocarcinoma

Biliary cystadenocarcinomas are rare cystic hepatic neoplasms. They can be thought of as a malignant counterpart of biliary cystadenomas. Epidemiology There is recognised increased female predilection. Its incidence peak is around 60 years of age. Clinical presentation The clinical symptoms ...
Article

Biliary cystadenoma

Biliary cystadenomas are uncommon benign cystic neoplasms of the liver. Epidemiology Biliary cystadenomas occur predominantly in middle-aged patients and are more common in women 1. Clinical presentation The clinical presentation of biliary cystadenomas is variable, depending on the size and...
Article

Biliary papillomatosis

Biliary papillomatosis (BP) is rare type of papillomatosis that involves the biliary ducts. Epidemiology It is often observed in middle-aged and elderly patients and is more common in men (male-to-female ratio 2:1). Clinical presentation Biliary papillomatosis is usually at an advanced stage...
Article

Biliary tree anatomy

Various channels that collect bile from the hepatic parenchyma and transport it to the duodenum constitute the biliary tree. Gross anatomy By convention the biliary tree is divided into intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts 1. There is significant variation in the biliary tree with the classical...
Article

Biloma

Bilomas refer to extrabiliary collections of bile. They can be either intra- or extrahepatic.  Terminology There is a slight discrepency in the reported literature in the use of the term "biloma". Many authors have used it exclusively to refer to intrahepatic bile collections or other bilious ...
Article

Bismuth-Corlette classification

The Bismuth-Corlette classification is a classification system for perihilar cholangiocarcinomas, which is based on the extent of ductal infiltration.   Classification type I limited to the common hepatic duct, below the level of the confluence of the right and left hepatic ducts type II in...
Article

Bright dot sign (atypical liver haemangioma)

The bright dot sign refers to the presence of a bright dot within a lesion which remains hyperattenuating on arterial and portal venous phase CT, corresponding to early nodular enhancement seen on dynamic MRI of liver haemangioma.  This can be used as an indicator that the lesion in question is...
Article

Budd-Chiari syndrome

Budd-Chiari syndrome refers to the clinical picture that occurs when there is partial or complete hepatic venous outflow obstruction. Epidemiology Budd-Chiari syndrome is rare. A Japanese study estimated the prevalence to be in the region of 2.4 cases/million 4.  In Western populations, the mo...
Article

Bulging duodenal papilla

Major duodenal papilla is a conic or cylindric protuberance at the medial aspect of the descending or horizontal duodenum at the site of the sphincter of Oddi. It is finding on small bowel follow-though (and endoscopy) and has a relatively long differential. On cross sectional imaging, the unde...
Article

Bunch of grapes sign (disambiguation)

Bunch-of-grapes sign refers to the ultrasound appearance of multiple cystic spaces or lesions and it has been described in a number of settings: within the uterus as a result of hydropic swelling of trophoblastic villi within a hydatidiform mole in bronchiectasis, where on plain radiograph, th...
Article

CA 19-9 elevation

CA 19-9 is a serum antigen (monosialoganglioside) that has increased diagnostic use in the management of several malignancies, mainly of hepato-pancreatico-biliary origin. It is nonspecific, however, and can rise in both malignant and nonmalignant conditions. Elevation of serum CA 19-9 has been...
Article

CA-125

Serum CA-125 is well recognised as an ovarian cancer-associated marker and is an antigen determinant on a high-molecular-weight glycoprotein. The normal range of CA-125 is 0-35 U/mL. Serum CA-125 levels can also be used to monitor the response to treatment as well as a prognostic indicator as t...
Article

Calot triangle

Calot triangle is a small (potential) triangular space at the porta hepatis of surgical importance as it is dissected during cholecystectomy. Its contents, the cystic artery and cystic duct must be identified before ligation and division to avoid damaging them during the operation. Gross anatom...
Article

Caput medusae sign (developmental venous anomaly)

The caput medusae sign, refers to developmental venous anomalies of the brain, where a number of veins drain centrally towards a single drain vein. The appearance is reminiscent of Medusa, a gorgon of Greek mythology, who was encountered and defeated by Perseus. The sign is seen on both CT and ...
Article

Caput medusae sign (portal hypertension)

The caput medusae sign is seen in patients with severe portal hypertension. It describes the appearance of distended and engorged paraumbilical veins, which are seen radiating from the umbilicus across the abdomen to join the systemic veins.  History and etymology The appearance is reminiscent...
Article

Carcinoembryonic antigen

Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell-adhesive glycoprotein that was discovered in colorectal cancer in 1965, and is hence one of the oldest and most used tumour markers. Its name derives from its normal expression in fetoembryonic liver, gut and pancreas tissue. Normal range of CEA is...
Article

Carcinogens

Carcinogens are substances known to cause cancer. They include: Brain vinyl chloride Nasopharynx / nasal passage nickel wood dust chromium Thyroid ionising radiation (not technically a substance) Skin arsenic coal tars polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) Lungs arsenic asbestos chloro...
Article

Cardiac sclerosis

Cardiac sclerosis, or "cardiac cirrhosis" is the end-point of passive hepatic congestion from heart failure.  Pathology Aetiology Causes of cardiac cirrhosis include 1: ischaemic heart disease: ~30% cardiomyopathy: ~25% valvular heart disease: ~25% restrictive lung disease: ~15% pericard...
Article

Caroli disease

Caroli disease is a congenital disorder comprising of multifocal cystic dilatation of segmental intrahepatic bile ducts. However, some series show that extrahepatic duct involvement may exist 2. It is also classified as a type V choledochal cyst, according to the Todani classification. Epidemio...
Article

Caudate–right lobe ratio

Caudate-right lobe ratio (C/RL) is used in the assessment of livers, usually in the setting of cirrhosis, in which there is atrophy of the right lobe with hypertrophy of the caudate lobe.  Method for measuring image: axial slice immediately below the bifurcation of the main portal vein line 1...
Article

Cavernous transformation of the portal vein

Cavernous transformation of the portal vein (CTPV) is a sequela of portal vein thrombosis and is the replacement of the normal single channel portal vein with numerous tortuous venous channels. For a discussion of demographics and presentation, please refer to the article on portal vein thrombo...
Article

Chemotherapy induced cholangitis

Chemotherapy induced cholangitis is caused when intra-arterial chemotherapy is introduced to treat liver metastases. This causes strictures of the common hepatic duct and main ducts, but spares distal and proximal (i.e. common bile duct and intrahepatic ducts).  Radiographic features similar t...
Article

Child-Pugh score

The Child-Pugh score is a scoring system to measure the severity of chronic liver disease inclusive of cirrhosis. The intention is to provide a system with which clinicians can objectively communicate about liver function. The score is composed from several categories: total bilirubin, μmol/l ...
Article

Cholangiocarcinoma

Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumour arising from cholangiocytes in the biliary tree. It tends to have a poor prognosis and high morbidity. It is the second most common primary hepatic tumour, with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICCs) accounting for 10-20% of primary liver tumours. Epide...
Article

Cholangiocarcinoma (staging)

Cholangiocarcinoma staging is dependant on whether the tumour is primarily intrahepatic (ICC), hilar/perihilar (Klatskin), or extrahepatic. Tumour resection is currently the most optimal treatment and the ability of the tumour to infiltrate longitudinally and radially along the biliary tree nec...
Article

Cholangitis

Cholangitis is a relatively broad descriptive term term referring to inflammation of the bile ducts.  It has many forms and can arise from a number of situations: primary sclerosing cholangitis chemotherapy induced cholangitis eosinophilic cholangitis 5 infective cholangitis EBV cholangiti...
Article

Cholecystectomy

Cholecystectomies are one of the most common surgical procedures performed. Evidence of a cholecystectomy are often seen on imaging procedures with surgical clips in the gallbladder fossa and radiologists should be aware of possible complications.  Indications cholelithiasis cholecystitis Pr...
Article

Cholecystitis

Cholecystitis refers to any form of inflammation involving the gallbladder and has many forms including: acute cholecystitis acute calculous cholecystitis acute acalculous cholecystitis chronic cholecystitis emphysematous cholecystitis xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis suppurative cholecy...
Article

Choledochal cyst

Choledochal cysts represent congenital cystic dilatations of the biliary tree. Diagnosis relies on the exclusion of other conditions (e.g. tumour, gallstone, inflammation) as a cause of biliary duct dilatation. Epidemiology Choledochal cysts are rare, with an incidence of 1:100,000-150,000. Al...
Article

Choledochocoele

Choledochocoeles refer to a specific type of choledochal cyst (type III under the Todani classification system). In this type, there is dilatation of the intramural portion of the distal common bile duct within the duodenal wall. Its precise aetiology is not clear 3. Patients are usually adolesc...
Article

Choledocholithiasis

Choledocholithiasis denotes the presence of gallstones within the bile ducts (common hepatic duct / common bile duct). Epidemiology Choledocholithiasis is relatively common, seen in in 6-12% of patients who undergo cholecystectomy 2. Clinical presentation Stones within the bile duct are ofte...
Article

Cholescintigraphy

Cholescintigraphy is the use of radiotracers to assess the anatomy and function of the biliary system (and the liver indirectly). Currently this is most commonly performed with Tc99m-IDA analogues, and "h"epatic "IDA" imaging gave rise to the more common term "HIDA scan." After intravenous inje...
Article

Chronic cholecystitis

Chronic cholecystitis refers to prolonged inflammatory condition that affects the gallbladder. It is almost always seen in the setting of cholelithiasis (95%), caused by intermittent obstruction of the cystic duct or infundibulum or dysmotility. Clinical presentation Patients may have a histor...
Article

Chronic pancreatitis

Chronic pancreatitis represents the end result of a continuous, prolonged, inflammatory and fibrosing process that affects the pancreas. This results in irreversible morphologic changes and permanent endocrine and exocrine pancreatic dysfunction. Epidemiology The most common cause of chronic p...
Article

Ciliated hepatic foregut cyst

Ciliated hepatic foregut cyst is a very rare type of hepatic cyst, with nonspecific radiological features. Less than a hundred of cases have been reported yet 1. They are usually benign, but rare cases of malignant degeneration (in squamous cell carcinoma) have also been reported 1-4.  Epidemio...
Article

Cirrhosis

Cirrhosis is the common endpoint of a wide variety of chronic liver disease processes which cause hepatocellular necrosis. Cirrhosis can be diagnosed with ultrasound, CT, and MRI, and these imaging modalities can also be used to evaluate for possible complications of cirrhosis, such as portal hy...
Article

Clonorchiasis

Clonorchiasis is a trematodiasis caused by chronic infestation by Clonorchis sinensis, and can lead to recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, biliary strictures and cholangiocarcinoma.  Epidemiology Infection with Clonorchis sinensis occurs in endemic areas, mainly east China. Over 85 million people ...
Article

Coarsened hepatic echotexture

Coarsened hepatic echotexture is a sonographic descriptor where there uniform smooth hepatic echotexture of the liver is lost. This can occur due to number of reasons which include: conditions that cause hepatic fibrosis 1 cirrhosis haemochromatosis various types of hepatitis 3 particularly...

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