Radiopaedia.org is a free educational radiology resource with one of the web's largest collections of radiology cases and reference articles.

Case of the Day

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Syndactyly of the 3rd and 4th digits

Contributed by Dustin Roberts

Syndactyly is the congenital fusion of soft tissue and/or osseous structures between two fingers. It can be present as an isolated anomaly or in association with polydactlyly, acrosyndactyly, clinodactyly, synostosis, or cleft hand. It can also be a feature in numerous congenital syndromes, including Apert’s syndrome, Poland’s syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome…

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