Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

1,793 results found
Article

Femoral artery pseudoaneurysm

Femoral artery pseudoaneurysms are usually iatrogenic as the femoral artery is the vessel of choice for most endovascular arterial interventions. Pathology Aetiology iatrogenic anticoagulation therapy inadequate compression following endovascular intervention improper arterial puncture tec...
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Femoral hernia

A femoral hernia is a type of groin herniation and comprises of a protrusion of a peritoneal sac through the femoral ring into the femoral canal, posterior and inferior to the inguinal ligament. The sac may contain preperitoneal fat, omentum, small bowel, or other structures. Epidemiology Ther...
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Femoro-acetabular impingement

Femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) refers to a clinical syndrome of painful, limited hip motion resulting from certain types of underlying morphological abnormalities in the femoral head/neck region and/or surrounding acetabulum. FAI can lead to early degenerative disease. Epidemiology Pincer...
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Fetal anaemia

Fetal anaemia can result from many causes. Pathology Aetiology haemolytic disease of the newborn fetomaternal ABO incompatibility fetomaternal rhesus (Rh) incompatibility fetal infections fetal parvovirus B19 infection haematopoetic abnomalities homozygous alpha thalassaemia 7 syndrome...
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Fetal ascites

Fetal ascites refers to the accumulation of free fluid in the fetal abdomen. It is often considered under the same spectrum of hydrops fetalis. Pathology Aetiology any condition that results in hydrops fetalis additional causes include idiopathic bowel perforation (e.g. meconium peritoniti...
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Fetal atrial flutter

Fetal atrial flutter is the second most common fetal tachyarrhythmia and can account for up to 30% of such cases 1-2.  Clinical presentation As with other tachyarrthymias it is often detected in the 3rd trimester. Pathophysiology It has a typical atrial rate of 300-600 beats per minute (bpm)...
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Fetal bradyarrhythmia

Fetal bradyarrhythmia refers to an abnormally low fetal heart rate (less than 100-110 beats per minute 3,7) as well as being irregular, i.e. irregular fetal bradycardia. Pathology A fetal bradyarrhythmia can fall in to several types which include fetal partial atrioventricular block (PAVB) f...
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Fetal bradycardia

Fetal bradycardia refers to an abnormally low fetal heart rate, a potentially ominous finding. A sustained first trimester heart rate below 100 beats per minute (bpm) is generally considered bradycardic. The average fetal heart rate changes during pregnancy, however, and some consider the lower ...
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Fetal cardiomegaly

Fetal cardiomegaly (FC) essentially refers to an enlarged fetal heart. It is variably defined with some sources stating the cut off as a fetal cardio-thoracic circumference above two standard deviations 7.  Pathology It can arise from a number of situations which include congenital cardiac an...
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Fetal cardiomyopathy

Fetal cardiomyopathy refers to a very rare situation where a cardiomyopathy occurs in utero. It is often a diagnosis of exclusion where by definition there is an absence of an underlying congenital cardiac morphological anomaly. Epidemiology The estimated incidence is variable with the high en...
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Fetal chylothorax

Fetal chylothorax is defined as the presence of lymphatic fluid within the pleural cavity . Pathology Associations pulmonary hypoplasia hydrops fetalis premature delivery Radiographic features Antenatal ultrasound may show echogenic fluid in the pleural cavities Treatment Some ...
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Fetal enteric duplication cyst

Fetal enteric duplication cysts are enteric duplication cysts presenting in utero. Pathology They result from an abnormal recanalisation of the gastrointestinal tract. They comprise of a two-layer smooth muscle wall and an internal epithelium of a respiratory or intestinal type. These cysts ma...
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Fetal goitre

A fetal goitre is an enlargement of the thyroid gland in utero. It can occur with either hyper or hypothyroidism (and in isolated cases of euthyroidism 8). Pathology The mechanism is different depending on whether the underlying cause is hyper or hypothyroidism.  Associations maternal Graves...
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Fetal hydrocephalus

Fetal hydrocephalus often refers to an extension of fetal ventriculomegaly where the ventricular dilatation is more severe. It is usually defined when the fetal lateral ventricular diameter is greater than 15 mm 1. Epidemiology The estimated incidence is 0.5-3% per 1000 live births. There may ...
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Fetal hydrocoele

A fetal hydrocoele refers to an hydrocoele present in utero. Epidemiology They may be sonographically identified in ~ 15% of male fetuses in the third trimester 6. Pathology Often result from a patent processus vaginalis. They are more frequently unilateral.  Associations hydrops fetalis ...
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Fetal parvovirus B19 infection

Fetal parvovirus B19 infection is a type of in utero infection. In certain cases it can lead to intra-uterine fetal death.  Pathology  It was first reported to be associated with fetal death and hydrops fetalis in 1984. Human parvovirus B19 is the only known parovirus virus pathogenic to human...
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Fetal pericardial teratoma

Fetal pericardial teratomas are rare pericardial teratomas that present in utero. They are an uncommon primary cardiac tumour occurring in a fetus. Pathology It is a type of germ cell tumour and arises from multipotential cells derived from all three germinal layers. In contrast to ovarian ter...
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Fibrillary astrocytoma

Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type of diffuse low grade astrocytoma and as of the 2016 update to WHO classification of CNS tumours it no longer exists as a distinct entity, having been incorporated into the generic term diffuse astrocytoma 6.  Terminology Unlike the other variant...
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Fibroadenoma (breast)

Fibroadenoma is a common benign breast lesion and results from excess proliferation of connective tissue. Fibroadenomas characteristically contain both stromal and epithelial cells.  Epidemiology They usually occur in women between the ages of 10 and 40 years. It is the most common breast mass...
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Fibrocartilaginous embolism

Fibrocartilaginous embolism (also known as nucleus pulposus embolism) is a rare cause of spinal cord ischaemia due to embolisation of nucleus pulposus material from intervertebral disc in a retrograde direction to a spinal artery or vein. Fibrocartilaginous embolism is a diagnosis of suspicion....
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Fibrocystic change (breast)

Fibrocystic change of the breast (also known as diffuse cystic mastopathy) is a benign alteration in the terminal ductal lobular unit of the breast with or without associated fibrosis. It is seen as a wide spectrum of altered morphology in the female breast from innocuous to those associated wit...
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Fibromatosis colli

Fibromatosis colli is a rare form of infantile fibromatosis that occurs within the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). Epidemiology There may be a slight male predilection. It typically presents a few weeks after birth. Clinical presentation Presentation is usually with torticollis and is most...
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Fibromatosis of the breast

Fibromatosis of the breast (also known as an extra-abdominal desmoid tumour of the breast or mammary fibromatosis 4) is considered as a type of rare breast tumour. It is a non-metastasising benign but locally invasive stromal tumour 4. However, it can mimic more sinister types of breast cancer o...
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Fibrosarcoma of the bone

Fibrosarcoma of the bone is a rare malignant bone tumor which may occur as a primary lesion, or secondarily after radiation treatment, dedifferentiation from other tumors 3 or pathologies such as Paget disease, bone infarction, or chronic osteomyelitis. Terminology It is a distinct entity from...
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Fibrosarcoma of the breast

Fibrosarcoma of the breast is a type of malignant stromal sarcoma that rarely occurs as a primary tumour within the breast.  Pathology A fibrosarcoma is composed of immature mesenchymal elements surrounded by a collagenous substance. It is a type of breast sarcoma with a predominant “herringbo...
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Fibrosing colonopathy

Fibrosing colonopathy a condition characterised by progressive submucosal fibrosis, particularly of the proximal colon. It is associated with high dose lipase supplementation used to treat exocrine insufficiency of the pancreas, such as in treatment for cystic fibrosis. Epidemiology It is more...
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Fibrothorax

Fibrothorax is defined as fibrosis within the pleural space, and occurs secondary to the inflammatory response to one of the following events:   tuberculosis / tuberculous pleuritis - particularly as a late sequelae 3 thoracic empyema asbestos related pleural disease rheumatoid arthritis ha...
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Fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonitis

Fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonitis is a histological subtype of non-specific interstitial pneumonitis (NSIP). It is considered the more common form 1. This pattern manifests as chronic interstitial inflammation obscured by interstitial fibrosis (with dense collagen), a temporal homog...
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Fibrous cortical defect

Fibrous cortical defects (FCD) are benign bony lesions and are a type of fibroxanthoma, histologically identical to the larger non-ossifying fibroma (NOF). Epidemiology Fibrous cortical defects typically occur in children (usually 2-15 years), and indeed are one of the most common benign bony ...
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Fibrous meningioma

Fibrous meningiomas (also known as fibroblastic meningiomas) are the second most common histological subtype of meningioma, found in ~50% of all meningiomas, usually along with meningothelial histology (40%) or in isolation (7%). They are, for some reason, the most common intraventricular mening...
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Fibular hemimelia

Fibular hemimelia is a congenital lower limb anomaly characterised by partial or complete absence of fibula and includes a spectrum ranging from mild fibular hypoplasia to complete fibular aplasia 1. Epidemiology Although rare in occurrence, it is the most common congenital absence of long bon...
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First branchial cleft cyst

First branchial cleft cysts are a type of branchial cleft anomaly. They are uncommon and represent only ~7% of all branchial cleft cysts. Epidemiology They are usually diagnosed in middle-aged women 3-4.  Clinical presentation Their presentation can in the form of 3 asymptomatic - incidenta...
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Fish vertebra

The term fish vertebra (also codfish vertebra) describes the biconcave appearance of vertebrae (especially lumbar vertebrae). Pathology osteoporosis  sickle cell disease hereditary spherocytosis homocystinuria renal osteodystrophy osteogenesis imperfecta thalassemia major (rarely) Histo...
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Flail chest

Flail chest or flail thoracic segment occurs when three or more contiguous ribs are fractured in two or more places. Clinically, a segment of only one or two ribs can act as a flail segment, hence there is some controversy between the clinical and radiological definitions. Clinical presentation...
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Flash filling hepatic venous malformation

Flash filling hepatic venous malformations, also known as flash filling hepatic haemangiomas, are a type of atypical hepatic venous malformation (haemangioma), which due to its imaging features often raises the concern of a malignant process rather than a benign one.  Terminology It is importa...
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Flavivirus encephalitis

Flavivirus encephalitis include a number of entities which characteristically involve the basal ganglia and thalami.  Clinical presentation Typically these conditions present with a prodrome which is nonspecific but indicative of a viral infection. Symptoms include fever, myalgia, rash, rigors...
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Flexner-Wintersteiner rosette

The presence of Flexner-Wintersteiner rosette is characteristic for retinoblastoma but is also seen in pineoblastoma and medulloepitheliomas. 
Article

Floating teeth

Floating teeth is the description given to the appearances on imaging of teeth 'hanging in the wind' as a result of alveolar bone destruction around the root of the teeth.  Differential diagnosis They are uncommonly encountered, with a wide differential diagnosis - albeit that the underlying c...
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Fluorosis

Skeletal fluorosis is a chronic metabolic bone disease caused by ingestion of large amounts of fluoride through either water or food in geographic areas where high levels of fluoride occur naturally. Radiographic features Plain film/CT Described features include: increased bone density: oste...
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Focal areas of signal intensity (brain)

Focal areas of signal intensity (FASI), alternatively called focal abnormal signal intensity or unidentified bright objects, are bright areas on T2-weighted images commonly identified in the basal ganglia (often the globus pallidus), thalamus, brainstem (pons), cerebellum, and subcortical white ...
Article

Focal brainstem glioma

Focal brainstem gliomas are a relatively uncommon type of brainstem glioma, which carry a more favorable prognosis compared to the more common diffuse brainstem glioma. The name is a reflection of the imaging findings, which demonstrate a sharply demarcated mass with relatively frequent enhancem...
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Focal cortical dysplasia

Focal cortical dysplasias (FCD) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders of cortical formation, which may demonstrate both architectural and proliferative features. They are one of the most common causes of epilepsy and can be associated with hippocampal sclerosis and cortical glioneuronal n...
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Focal lymphoid hyperplasia of the lung

Focal lymphoid hyperplasia of the lung refers to an abnormal accumulation of non-malignant lymphocytic aggregates within the lung.  Terminology It iwas previously known as pulmonary pseudolymphoma. Clinical presentation Clinical features can vary from being asymptomatic to various symptoms s...
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Follicular lymphoma

Follicular lymphoma is a subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is, in fact, the most common type. Epidemiology Estimated to account for ~45% of all NHL cases 1. Higher rates in North America and Europe 4.  Pathology Nodal effacement by closely packed follicles containing small cleaved ce...
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Follicular thyroid adenoma

Follicular thyroid adenoma is a commonly found benign neoplasm of the thyroid consisting of differentiated follicular cells. It can not be differentiated from follicular carcinoma on cytologic, sonographic or clinical features alone 1. Epidemiology Follicular thyroid adenoma is more commonly f...
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Forked umbilical cord

Forked umbilical cord is rare anomaly of the umbilical cord, which can be detected on antenatal scan. The umbilical cord splits into two cords and contains three vessels in each of the bifurcated cords. This anomaly is seen associated with monochorionic twins. Radiographic features Ultrasound ...
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Fournier gangrene

Fournier gangrene is a necrotising fasciitis of the perineum. It is a true urological emergency due to the high mortality rate but fortunately the condition is rare. Epidemiology Fournier gangrene is typically seen in diabetic men aged 50-70 but is rarely seen in women. Other than age, predisp...
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Fracture healing

Fracture healing occurs naturally after traumatic bony disruption. This process begins with hemorrhage and progresses through three stages: inflammatory reparative remodelling This process can be supported by various treatment options with immobilisation a mainstay; inappropriate treatment m...
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Frontoethmoidal encephalocoele

Frontoethmoidal encephalocoeles are second only to occipital encephalocoeles in terms of frequency, representing approximately 15% of all encephalocoeles.  They represent meninges or brain tissue herniating through cranial defect in the anterior cranial fossa and typically result in facial defor...
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Fundic gland polyp

Fundic gland polyps (FGP) are the most common type of gastric polyp. Epidemiology FGPs occur most commonly in middle-aged females. They have been reported to be identified in ~1% of gastroscopies 3,4.  Clinical presentation FGPs are usually an asymptomatic, incidental finding 1.  Pathology ...
Article

Gallbladder carcinoma

Gallbladder carcinomas are usually asymptomatic until they reach an incurable stage. As such, early incidental detection is important, if the occasional patient is to be successfully treated. The majority (90%) are adenocarcinomas, and the remainder are squamous cell carcinomas.  Epidemiology ...
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Gallbladder dysfunction

Gallbladder dysfunction, or functional gallbladder disorder, refers to biliary pain due to motility disturbance of the gallbladder without gallstones, biliary sludge, microlithiasis or microcrystals. The disorder has previous been known by several other names, including gallbladder dyskinesia, g...
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Gallbladder hydrops

Gallbladder hydrops refers to marked dilatation of the gallbladder due to chronic obstruction of the cystic duct results in accumulation of the sterile non-pigmented mucin. Clinical presentation Abdominal pain with palpable gallbladder without any signs of infection. In an asymptomatic patient...
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Gallbladder perforation

Gallbladder perforations are a relatively rare complication that can occur in some situations but occurs most frequent as a result of acute cholecystitis. It can carry a relatively high mortality rate. It can also occur during laparoscopic cholecystectomies with the incidence of gallbladder perf...
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Gallbladder polyp

Gallbladder polyps are elevated lesions on the mucosal surface of the gallbladder. The vast majority are benign, but malignant entities are possible. Gallbladder polyps may be detected on ultrasound, CT, or MRI, but are usually best characterized on ultrasound. Epidemiology Gallbladder polyps ...
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Gallbladder volvulus

Gallbladder volvulus is a relatively rare condition in which there is a rotation of the gallbladder around the axis of the cystic duct and artery. Clinical presentation Symptoms are non-specific, however right upper quadrant pain and vomiting are similar to biliary colic. Laboratory evaluation...
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Gallstone pancreatitis

Gallstone pancreatitis refers to pancreatitis caused by gallstones, specifically distal choledocholithiasis. Gallstones is the cause for 35-40% of acute pancreatitis but this number has a wide regional variance.  Epidemiology Gallstone pancreatitis has a higher incidence in women (compared to ...
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Gallstones

Gallstones, also called cholelithiasis, are concretions that occur anywhere within the biliary system, most commonly within the gallbladder.  Terminology Gallstones (cholelithiasis) describes stone formation at any point along the biliary tree. Specific names can be given to gallstones dependi...
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Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) peak

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system 1 and as such, is one of the compounds examined in MR spectroscopy.  It is present in the human brain at a concentration of about 1 mM, a whole order of magnitude lower than some of the more...
Article

Ganglioneuroma

Ganglioneuromas are fully differentiated neuronal tumours that do not contain immature elements and potentially occur anywhere along the peripheral autonomic ganglion sites.  On imaging, usually, they present as well-defined solid masses and can be quite large at presentation. Generally, they a...
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Gangrenous cholecystitis

Gangrenous cholecystitis is the most common complication of acute cholecystitis, affecting ~15% (range 2-30%) of patients.  Pathology Gangrenous cholecystitis occurs as a result of ischaemia with necrosis of the gallbladder wall 4.  Risk factors male increasing age delayed surgery cardiov...
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Gartner duct cyst

Gartner duct cysts develop from embryologic remnants of the Wolffian (mesonephric) duct. They are often noticed incidentally on ultrasound or MRI. Clinical presentation They may cause mass effect on adjacent structures. Pathology Location Gartner duct cysts are located in the anterolateral ...
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Gastric adenocarcinoma

Gastric adenocarcinoma, commonly referred to as gastric cancer, refers to a primary malignancy arising from the gastric epithelium. It is the most common gastric malignancy.  Epidemiology Gastric cancer is rare before the age of 40, but its incidence steadily climbs after that and peaks in the...
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Gastric antral vascular ectasia

Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE), also known as watermelon stomach, is a rare condition affecting the stomach. It is one of the diagnoses to consider in older patients with severe anaemia and occult or profuse gastrointestinal bleeding (especially in those with cardiac, liver, or renal dis...
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Gastric antral web

Gastric antral webs are a ring of mucosa in the distal stomach (gastric antrum) that can lead to gastric outlet obstruction. A circumferential ring of mucosa has also been termed a "gastric antral diaphragm". Epidemiology Gastric antral webs are rare. There is an association with trisomy 21 an...
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Gastric lipoma

Gastric lipomas are a location-specific subtype of gastrointestinal lipomas and represent a rare benign mesenchymal tumours of the stomach. They can be definitively diagnosed on CT.  Epidemiology Gastric lipomas are rare, accounting for <5% of gastrointestinal lipomas and <1% of all gastric ne...
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Gastric polyps

Gastric polyps are uncommon findings, even on endoscopy where they are encountered in only 2-6% of patients.  Pathology There are a number of gastric polyp subtypes 1-3: non-neoplastic polyps hyperplastic polyps virtually no malignant potential typically small (<1cm), multiple, and sessile...
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Gastric volvulus

Gastric volvulus is a specific type of volvulus that occurs when the stomach twists on its mesentery. It should be at least 180° and cause bowel obstruction to be called gastric volvulus. Merely gastric rotation on its root is not considered gastric volvulus. Epidemiology Organo-axial volvulus...
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Gastrinoma

Gastrinomas are the second most common pancreatic endocrine tumour and the most common type in the setting of multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN I). Epidemiology Most gastrinomas are sporadic, although some are seen in the setting of multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN I). In genera...
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Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a spectrum of disease that occurs when gastric acid refluxes from the stomach into the lower end of the oesophagus across the lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS). Pathology Minor reflux disease In most patients with reflux disease, reflux is initiated...
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Gastrointestinal amyloidosis

Gastrointestinal amyloidosis is relatively common, although symptomatic involvement is more rare. It is diagnosed if there is persistent gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms with endoscopic biopsy proven amyloid deposition. Epidemiology Tends to affect middle-aged and older patients.  Clinical pres...
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Gastrointestinal angiodysplasia

Gastrointestinal angiodysplasias or angioectasias are one of the most common causes of occult gastrointestinal bleeding. Clinical presentation Patients can present with symptoms and signs upper or lower gastrointestinal bleeding although they can commonly be an incidental finding.  Epidemiolo...
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Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours

Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours (GI NETS) can be functional or non-functional: functional NETS can be challenging to localise as:  they are often small in size at the time of diagnosis  arise in many sites throughout the body non-functioning and/or malignant NETs often are larger at ...
Article

Gastroschisis

Gastroschisis refers to extra-abdominal herniation (evisceration) of fetal or neonatal bowel loops (and occasionally portions or the stomach and or liver) into the amniotic cavity through a para-umbilical abdominal wall defect.   Epidemiology The estimated incidence is at around 1-6 per 10,000...
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Gaucher disease

Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common lysosomal storage disease in humans. It is an autosomal recessive, multisystem disease arising from a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase or beta-glucosidase activity, resulting in accumulation of a glycolipid (glucocerebroside) within the lysosomes of macrop...
Article

Gel bleed in breast implants

Gel bleed is a phenomenon associated with silicone breast implants. Pathology Gel bleed refers to microscopic diffusion of silicone gel through the breast implant elastomer shell. The implant shell, made of silicone, is a semipermeable membrane that allows for the egress or bleed of silicone n...
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Gemistocytic astrocytoma

Gemistocytic astrocytoma is a histologic subtype of low grade astrocytoma, with a poorer prognosis than other matched WHO grade tumours, and with no specific imaging features.  For a general discussion of clinical presentation, epidemiology, treatment please refer to the article on low grade as...
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Geophagy

Geophagy is the intentional ingestion of earth, soil or clay and is a form of pica. This practice is not uncommon in the southern regions of the United States or provinces of Africa. It may be seen in pregnant or iron-deficient patients 3. Although geophagia may be seen in the context of a varie...
Article

Germinal matrix haemorrhage

Germinal matrix haemorrhages, also know as periventricular-intraventricular haemorrhages (PVIH), correspond to the most common type of intracranial haemorrhage in neonates and are related to a perinatal stress affecting the highly vascularised subependymal germinal matrix. The majority of cases ...
Article

Germinoma

The term germinoma usually refers to a tumour of the brain (WHO Classification of CNS tumours), but can also refer to similar tumours of the ovary and testis. dysgerminoma of the ovary seminoma of the testis CNS germinoma All three tumours share similar histology. 
Article

Gerstmann syndrome

Gerstmann syndrome, also known as angular gyrus syndrome, is a dominant hemisphere stroke syndrome consisting of four components:  agraphia or dysgraphia acalculia or dyscalculia finger agnosia left-right disorientation Pure Gerstmann syndrome is said to be without aphasia. History and ety...
Article

Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease

Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease is a very rare type of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. It manifests with dementia and/or ataxia and is due to a mutation in the prion protein (PRNP) gene, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. 
Article

Gestational choriocarcinoma

Gestational choriocarcinoma (GC) is a type of choriocarcinoma that follows a gestational event. Similar to choriocarcinomas in general, it lies at the malignant end of the spectrum of gestational trophoblastic disease. Pathology Approximately 50% of gestational choriocarcinomas arise from a pr...
Article

Giant cell glioblastoma

Giant cell glioblastoma is a variant of glioblastoma (along with epithelioid glioblastoma and giant cell glioblastoma) recognised in the current (2016) WHO classification of CNS tumours 7. This tumour was previously called monstrocellular tumour due to the macro size of its cells. Epidemiology ...
Article

Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath

Giant cell tumours of the tendon sheath (GCTTS), also known as pigmented villonodular tumour of the tendon sheath (PVNTS) or extra-articular pigmented villonodular tumour of the tendon sheath, are uncommon and usually benign lesions that arise from the tendon sheath. It is unclear whether these ...
Article

Giant cerebral aneurysm

Giant cerebral aneurysms are ones that measure >25 mm in greatest dimension.  Epidemiology Giant cerebral aneurysms account for ~5% of all intracranial aneurysms 1,3. They occur in the 5th-7th decades and are more common in females 2. Clinical presentation Patients can present with symptoms ...
Article

Giant fibroadenoma

Giant fibroadenomas are fibroadenomas weighing more than 500 grams or measuring >5 cm in size 2. They are usually encountered in pregnant or lactating women.
Article

Gigantomastia

Gigantomastia (or macromastia) is a term given when there is massive breast enlargement. It is often associated with pregnancy. Gigantomastia is a very common condition characterised by proliferation of either breast fatty tissue or glandular tissue or both, resulting in rapid increase in breas...
Article

Glial cells

Glial cells, or neuroglia, are cells that surround the neurones of the central nervous system embedded between them, providing both structural and physiological support 1-3.  Together they account for almost half of the total mass 1 and 90% of all cells of the central nervous system 3. Glial ce...
Article

Glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)

Glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) is a commonly used target for immunohistochemistry and is positive in many glial cells and tumours of glial origin. GFAP is the building block for intermediate filaments which are abundant in the cytoplasms particularly of astrocytes. 
Article

Gliomatosis cerebri

Gliomatosis cerebri is a rare growth pattern of diffuse gliomas that involves at least three lobes by definition. There often is an important discordance between clinical and radiological findings, as it may be clinically silent while it appears as a very extensive process radiologically. Impor...
Article

Gliosarcoma

Gliosarcomas are a variant of glioblastoma (along with epithelioid glioblastoma and giant cell glioblastoma) recognised in the current (2016) WHO classification of CNS tumours 9. They are highly malignant (WHO grade IV) primary intra-axial neoplasms with both glial and mesenchymal elements. Ter...
Article

Gliosis

Gliosis is the focal proliferation of glial cells in the CNS in response to insult. By strict definition, gliosis is not synonymous with encephalomalacia which is the end result of liquefactive necrosis of brain parenchyma following an insult. Radiologically they share similar features and is of...

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