Articles

Articles are a collaborative effort to provide a single canonical page on all topics relevant to the practice of radiology. As such, articles are written and edited by countless contributing members over a period of time. A global group of dedicated editors oversee accuracy, consulting with expert advisers, and constantly reviewing additions.

984 results found
Article

Left perihepatic space

The left perihepatic space is a subdivision of the left supramesocolic space. Gross anatomy The left perihepatic space can be further subdivided into anterior and posterior spaces: anterior perihepatic space lies between the diaphragm and the anterosuperior aspect of the left lobe of the liv...
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Right supramesocolic space

The right supramesocolic space is an arbitrary subdivision of the supramesocolic space, which lies between the diaphragm and the transverse colon. Gross anatomy The right supramesocolic space is separated from the left supramesocolic space by the falciform ligament, and can be divided into thr...
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Intra-abdominal calcification

Intra-abdominal calcification is common and the causes may be classified into four broad groups based on morphology: Concretions These are discrete precipitates in a vessel or organ. They are sharp in outline but the density and shape vary but in some cases they may be virtually pathognomonic:...
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Cockade sign (disambiguation)

There are several described cockade signs in radiology: cockade sign (intraosseous lipoma) cockade sign (aorto-left ventricular tunnel) 1 cockade sign (appendicitis) 2 cockade sign (hypertrophic pyloric stenosis) 3 cockade sign (GI tumours) 4
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Rectal cancer (staging)

Staging strongly influences the success of and rate of local recurrence following rectal cancer resection. MRI is the modality of choice for the staging of rectal cancer, to guide surgical and non-surgical management options. MRI is used at diagnosis, following downstaging chemoradiotherapy, and...
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Anal cancer

Anal cancer is a relatively uncommon, accounting for less than 2% of large bowel malignancies, and most of the cases are made of squamous cell carcinoma.  Epidemiology It accounts for less than 2% of large bowel malignancies and 1-6% of anorectal tumours (~1.5% of all gastrointestinal tract ma...
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Inflammatory bowel disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), although occasionally used to encompass a variety of infective and purely inflammatory bowel conditions, usually refers to two idopathic conditions Crohn disease ulcerative colitis Indeterminate colitis is added to the list, and represents approximately 6% of...
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Achalasia

Achalasia (primary achalasia) is a failure of organised oesophageal peristalsis causing impaired relaxation of the lower oesophageal sphincter, and resulting in food stasis and often marked dilatation of the oesophagus.  Obstruction of the distal oesophagus from other non-functional etiologies,...
Article

Wandering spleen

Wandering spleen is a rare condition in which the spleen migrates from its usual anatomical position, commonly to the lower abdomen or pelvis. Epidemiology Wandering spleen is rare, with a reported incidence of <0.5%. Diagnosis is most commonly made between ages 20 and 40 years and is more co...
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Indeterminate colitis

Indeterminate colitis is considered a somewhat controversial term. It was originally used by pathologists when no specific features for either Crohn disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) were seen. Over the years the term has been adopted to describe patients in whom a diagnosis of UC or CD ca...
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Bowel and mesenteric trauma

Bowel and mesenteric trauma can result from blunt force, penetrating and iatrogenic trauma. Epidemiology The bowel and mesentery are injured in ~2.5% (range 0.3-5%) of blunt force abdominal trauma 1,3,5,8. However not surprisingly, bowel and mesenteric injuries are more frequent after penetrat...
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Appendiceal carcinoid

Appendiceal carcinoids are rare overall but represent the most common tumour of the appendix. The appendix is also one of the most common (but not the most common) locations for gastrointestinal carcinoid tumours.  Clinical presentation Appendiceal carcinoids can present as the obstructive cau...
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CT enterography

Computed tomographic (CT) enterography is a non-invasive technique for diagnosis of small bowel disorders. Advantages  evaluates the entire thickness of the bowel wall offers information about the surrounding mesentery, the mesenteric vasculature and the perienteric fat useful in the assessm...
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Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms or tumours (IPMNs or IMPTs) are cystic tumours of the pancreas. Epidemiology These tumours are most frequently identified in older patients (50-60 years of age) 6, and thus are sometimes colloquially referred to as the "grandfather lesion". Main duct ty...
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Complications post optical colonoscopy

Complications post optical colonoscopy are most commonly assessed by CT if patients present with abdominal symptoms post colonoscopy. Complications include: bowel perforation (most common) pneumoperitoneum pneumoretroperitoneum pneumomediastinum pneumothorax lower gastrointestinal haemorrh...
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Stercoral perforation

Stercoral perforation is defined as a bowel perforation due to pressure necrosis from a faecal mass (faecaloma) 1. It is an uncommon, but life-threatening, complication of unresolved faecal impaction and can be a cause of acute abdomen secondary to faecal peritonitis. Epidemiology It may repre...
Article

Stercoral colitis

Stercoral colitis refers to a condition where the presence of impacted faeces in the colonic lumen is associated with inflammation and distention of the affected colon segment. Epidemiology It is seen primarily in elderly patients (often bedbound as a consequence of dementia, stroke, or orthop...
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Foregut duplication cyst

Foregut duplication cysts are a type of congenital duplication cyst. They are sometimes classified under bronchopulmonary foregut malformations. Entities classified as foregut duplication cysts include: bronchogenic cysts neurenteric cysts other enteric cysts oesophageal duplication cysts ...
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Rapunzel syndrome

Rapunzel syndrome is the term for a trichobezoar (gastric 'hair ball') which has a tail-like extension into the small bowel through the pylorus causing gastric outlet obstruction. For discussion of other gastrointestinal foreign bodies, please see: bezoars. Clinical presentation The patient u...
Article

Dieulafoy lesion

Dieulafoy lesions are uncommon but important causes of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. A Dieulafoy lesion is characterised by a dilated tortuous submucosal artery that erodes overlying gastrointestinal mucosa.   Epidemiology contributes to ~1.5% of all acute gastrointestinal bleeding 1 men:w...
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Stump appendicitis

Stump appendicitis refers to inflammation of the residual appendiceal tissue post appendectomy. Pathology Partial removal of the appendix with a residual stump allows for a chance of recurrent appendicitis. Chances of a partial removal are found to be higher in cases where there is a wrong ide...
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Acute superior mesenteric vein thrombosis

Acute superior mesenteric vein thrombosis is one of the less common causes of intestinal ischaemia. Often despite thrombosis of the SMV, small bowel necrosis does not occur, presumably due to persistent arterial supply and some venous drainage via collaterals.   For a general discussion refer t...
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Cavitating mesenteric lymph node syndrome

Cavitary mesenteric lymph node syndrome is seen in association with coeliac disease and is characterised by the triad of: splenic atrophy  low-attenuation lymphadenopathy that sometimes contains fat-fluid levels villous atrophy
Article

Coeliac disease

Coeliac disease, also known as non-tropical sprue, is a T-cell mediated autoimmune chronic gluten intolerance condition characterised by a loss of villi in the proximal small bowel and gastrointestinal malabsorption (sprue). It should always be considered as a possible underlying aetiology in c...
Article

Intestinal ischaemia

Intestinal ischaemia refers to vascular compromise of the bowel which in the acute setting has a very high mortality if not treated expediently. Diagnosis is often straightforward, provided appropriate imaging is obtained and sometimes subtle findings sought out. The disease can be arbitrarily c...
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Tailgut duplication cyst

Tailgut duplication cysts, also known as retrorectal cystic hamartomas, are rare congenital lesions that are thought to arise from vestiges of the embryonic hindgut.  Epidemiology There is a recognised strong female predilection. While it can present at any age, presentation is usually at arou...
Article

Castleman disease

Castleman disease, also known as angiofollicular lymph node hyperplasia or giant lymph node hyperplasia, is an uncommon benign B-cell lymphoproliferative condition. It can affect several regions of the body although commonly described as a solitary mediastinal mass. There are two distinct subty...
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Periampullary tumours

Periampullary tumours are those that arise within 2 cm of the ampulla of Vater in the duodenum. Tumours that fall under this group include four main types of tumours 1,4 that will be approached in their specific articles: pancreatic head/uncinate process tumours: includes pancreatic ductal ade...
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Ischaemic colitis

Ischaemic colitis refers to inflammation of the colon secondary to vascular insufficiency and ischaemia. It is sometimes considered under the same spectrum as intestinal ischaemia. The severity and consequences of the disease are highly variable. Epidemiology Ischaemic bowel is typically a dis...
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Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), also referred as post-transplant lymphoproliferation disorder, represents a variety of conditions ranging from lymphoid hyperplasia to malignancy, included in the 2008 WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues. It ca...
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Ampullary tumour

The term ampullary tumour generally refers to either benign or malignant neoplasms that arise from the glandular epithelium of the ampulla of Vater, including 1: ampullary adenoma (adenoma of ampulla of Vater) ampullary carcinoma (carcinoma of ampulla of Vater) According to some authors, ampu...
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Chronic pancreatitis

Chronic pancreatitis represents the end result of a continuous, prolonged, inflammatory and fibrosing process that affects the pancreas. This results in irreversible morphologic changes and permanent endocrine and exocrine pancreatic dysfunction. Epidemiology The most common cause of chronic p...
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Acute gastritis

Acute gastritis is a broad term that encompasses a myriad of causes of gastric mucosal inflammation. Epidemiology  Depends on the aetiology (see below). Clinical presentation asymptomatic epigastric pain/tenderness nausea and vomiting loss of appetite Pathology Aetiology infection: H. ...
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Femoral hernia

Femoral hernias are a type of groin herniation and comprise of a protrusion of a peritoneal sac through the femoral ring into the femoral canal, posterior and inferior to the inguinal ligament. The sac may contain preperitoneal fat, omentum, small bowel, or other structures. Epidemiology There...
Article

Gasless abdomen

A specific cause of the gasless abdomen can usually be made when the patient's history is known. Common causes include: small bowel obstruction bowel ischaemia congenital atresia ascites pancreatitis large abdominal mass - due to displacement
Article

Small bowel folds (differential)

Regular, smooth generalised thickening oedema congestive cardiac failure (CCF) hypoalbuminaemia lymphatic obstruction angioneurotic oedema infection radiation ischaemia haemorrhage anticoagulation or bleeding diathesis vasculitides IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schonlein purpura) Buerger d...
Article

Coeliac plexus block

Coeliac plexus block under image guidance is an easy and safe percutaneous procedure with good outcomes for pain palliation in patients who have chronic abdominal pain related to the coeliac ganglia.  This usually includes patients with advanced cancers, especially from upper abdominal viscera,...
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Abdominal paracentesis

Abdominal paracentesis, more commonly referred to as an ascitic tap, is a procedure that can be performed to collect peritoneal fluid for analysis or as a therapeutic intervention. Indications diagnostic: especially for newly diagnosed ascites determine aetiology of ascites assess for bacter...
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Necrotising enterocolitis (staging)

Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) can be staged into three groups, helping to guide appropriate treatment. In general, stage I and II are managed medically whereas stage III is managed surgically. stage I clinical signs lethargy, temperature instability, apnoea, bradycardia emesis, abdominal d...
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Littoral cell angioma of the spleen

Littoral cell angioma of the spleen (LCA) is a rare and relatively recently (1991) described vascular tumour of the spleen. Epidemiology Littoral cell angiomas may occur at any age and have no gender predilection. Clinical presentation Typically, patients with littoral cell angioma are found...
Article

Colonic stricture

Colonic strictures can be long (>10 cm) or short. Short scirrhous colorectal carcinoma (apple core sign) post surgical (anastamotic stricture) Long malignancy scirrhous colorectal carcinoma gastrointestinal lymphoma inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis Crohn disease post radi...
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Non-neoplastic solid lesions of the pancreas

Non-neoplastic solid lesions of the pancreas (NNSLP) are conditions which may mimic pancreatic neoplasms on imaging. They include: focal pancreatitis fatty infiltration-replacement intrapancreatic accessory spleen peripancreatic lymph node congenital anomalies, such as prominent pancreatic ...
Article

AFP elevation

Human alpha fetoprotein (AFP) elevation may occur in a vast number of conditions: liver tumours (hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatoblastoma) <10 ng/ml is within normal limits >20 ng/ml is above normal limits but has low specificity for tumour since it may occur in a setting of diffuse liver inj...
Article

Bulging duodenal papilla

Major duodenal papilla is a conic or cylindric protuberance at the medial aspect of the descending or horizontal duodenum at the site of the sphincter of Oddi. It is finding on small bowel follow-though (and endoscopy) and has a relatively long differential. On cross sectional imaging, the unde...
Article

Aphthoid ulceration

Aphthoid ulcers are shallow ulcers of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Pathology Aetiology infective inflammatory conditions Yersinia enterocolitis amoebic enterocolitis cytomegalovirus enterocolitis noninfective inflammatory conditions Crohn disease idiopathic granulomatous gastritis vasc...
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Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis is one of the presentations of diverticular disease and is most often a complication of colonic diverticulosis. Differentiating one from the other is critical since uncomplicated diverticulosis is mostly asymptomatic and acute diverticulitis is a potentially life-threatening illne...
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Abnormal bowel wall attenuation patterns

Abnormal bowel wall attenuation patterns on CT scan can be grouped under five categories: white enhancement gray enhancement water halo sign fat halo sign black attenuation The first three patterns are seen on contrast studies. White enhancement It is defined as uniform enhancement of th...
Article

Segmental arterial mediolysis

Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an increasingly recognised vascular disease of the middle-aged and elderly and a leading cause of spontanoeus intra-abdominal haemorrhage. It is characterised by fusiform aneurysms, stenoses, dissections and occlusions within splanchnic arterial branches. I...
Article

Terminal ileitis (differential)

The differential diagnosis for a terminal ileitis is quite extensive, and includes: inflammatory bowel disease Crohn disease (most common) backwash ileitis due to ulcerative colitis infectious colitis Yersinia spp.  Yersinia enterocolitica Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Salmonella spp. Clo...
Article

HIV/AIDS

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an immunosuppressed state, caused by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is characterised by opportunistic infections, neoplasms and neurological manifestations. Epidemiology According to the United Nations programme on HIV/AID...
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Multiple endocrine neoplasia type I

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN1), also known as Wermer syndrome, is an autosomal dominant genetic disease that results in proliferative lesions in multiple endocrine organs, particularly the pituitary gland, islet cells of the pancreas and parathyroid glands.  There are other multiple...
Article

Anal cancer (staging)

The most recent version of TNM staging of anal cancer is as follows: Primary tumour (T) TX: primary tumour cannot be assessed T0: no evidence of primary tumour Tis: carcinoma in situ (Bowen disease, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion [HSIL], anal intraepithelial neoplasia II-III (AIN...
Article

Acute superior mesenteric artery occlusion

Acute superior mesenteric artery occlusion, which can then result in an acute mesenteric ischaemia, can be a life-threatening event related to the artery supplying the majority of the small bowel and right side of the colon.  Epidemiology  An acute occlusion is an uncommon event that typically...
Article

Circumferential resection margin

The circumferential resection margin (CRM) is a term used in rectal carcinoma excision surgery (such as total mesorectal excision (TME)). Pathologic evaluation of the resection margin on the excised rectum has been considered important for determining the risk of local recurrence. A margin of ≤...
Article

Ulcerative colitis

Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease that not only predominantly affects the colon, but also has extraintestinal manifestations. Epidemiology Typically ulcerative colitis manifests in young adults (15-40 years of age) and is more prevalent in males but the onset of disease after...
Article

Shading sign (endometrioma)

Shading sign is an MRI finding typically seen in an endometrioma. It may also be seen with some endometrioid tumours (e.g endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary) It helps to distinguish endometriomas from other blood-containing lesions (e.g. haemorrhagic corpus luteum cysts), with a sensitivity of...
Article

Inflammatory bowel disease (thoracic manifestations)

Thoracic manifestations of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease can be variable and cannot be used to differentiate between these entities. They can develop at any time with respect to the clinical onset of the underlying disease. Actually, they can also predate the colonic disease or deve...
Article

Hiatus hernia

Hiatus hernias occur when there is herniation of abdominal contents through the oesophageal hiatus of the diaphragm into the thoracic cavity. Epidemiology The prevalence of hiatus hernia increases with age, with a slight female predilection. Clinical presentation Many patients with hiatus he...
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Crohn disease

Crohn disease, also known as regional enteritis, is an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease characterised by widespread discontinuous gastrointestinal tract inflammation. The terminal ileum and proximal colon are most often affected. Extraintestinal disease is common. Epidemiology The diagnos...
Article

Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (differential)

Lower gastrointestinal bleeding usually occurs distal to the ligament of Treitz, and has a wide differential diagnosis: diverticular disease enterocolitis infective Crohn’s disease ulcerative colitis ischaemic colitis vascular malformation vascular ectasia angiodysplasia arteriovenous ...
Article

Gallstone ileus

Gallstone ileus is an uncommon cause of a mechanical small bowel obstruction. It is a rare complication of chronic cholecystitis 7 and occurs when a gallstone passes through a fistula between the gallbladder and small bowel before becoming impacted at the ileocaecal valve.  Epidemiology Althou...
Article

MR enterography

MR enterography is a non-invasive technique for diagnosis of small bowel disorders. Indications The most common indication is to evaluate patients with Crohn disease (CD). Other less common indications would include coeliac disease, postoperative of adhesions, radiation enteritis, scleroderma,...
Article

Colorectal carcinoma

Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract and the second most frequently diagnosed malignancy in adults. CT and MRI are the modalities most frequently used for staging. Surgical resection may be curative although five-year survival rate is 40-50%. Epidem...
Article

Hepatic and splenic tuberculosis

Hepatic and splenic tuberculosis refers to tuberculosis affecting the liver and the spleen. It generally occurs due to haematogenous spread from the primary site of infection, commonly from pulmonary tuberculosis. Pathology Two types of lesions are known: micronodular (common) macronodular (...
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Splenic trauma

Splenic trauma can occur after blunt or penetrating trauma or secondary to medical intervention (i.e. iatrogenic). The spleen is the most frequently injured organ after blunt trauma. Clinical presentation Patients may present with left upper quadrant/left chest pain, left shoulder tip pain (re...
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Splenic infarction

Splenic infarction is a result of ischaemia to the spleen, and in many cases requires no treatment. However, identification of the cause of infarction is essential.   Epidemiology Splenic infarcts can occur due to a number of processes, involving either arterial supply, the spleen itself or th...
Article

Melioidosis

Melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (previously known as Pseudomonas pseudomallei) and is a multisystem disorder which may affect the lungs, brain, visceral organs, or musculoskeletal system. Epidemiology Melioidosis is a disease of the monsoon season in th...
Article

Richter hernia

Richter hernias are an abdominal hernia where only a portion of the bowel wall is herniated and comprise 10% of strangulated hernias. These hernias progress more rapidly to gangrene than other strangulated hernias but obstruction is less frequent.  Pathology In contrast to most other types of ...
Article

Revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis

The Revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis is an international multidisciplinary classification of the severity of acute pancreatitis, updating the 1991 Atlanta classification. It was initially revised in 2012 and then further updated in 2016 6. The worldwide consensus aims for an...
Article

Hide-bound sign (bowel)

The hide-bound bowel sign refers to an appearance on a barium study of the small bowel in patients with scleroderma. The sign describes the narrow separation between the valvulae conniventes which are of normal thickness despite dilatation of the bowel lumen.   Although the term hide-bound is u...
Article

Abdominal hernia

Abdominal hernias (herniae also used) may be congenital or acquired and come with varying eponyms. They are distinguished primarily based on location and content. 75-80% of all hernias are inguinal. Content of the hernia is variable, and may include: small bowel loops mobile colon segments (s...
Article

Scleroderma (gastrointestinal manifestations)

Gastrointestinal manifestations of scleroderma can occur in up to 90% of patients with scleroderma 2 with the commonest site of GI involvement being the oesophagus. As clinical presentation, radiographic appearances and differential diagnosis vary with the location of involvement these are disc...
Article

Gastric volvulus

Gastric volvulus is a specific type of volvulus that occurs when the stomach twists on its mesentery. It should be at least 180° and cause bowel obstruction to be called gastric volvulus. Merely gastric rotation on its root is not considered gastric volvulus. Epidemiology Organo-axial volvulus...
Article

Sprue

Sprue is the collective term for the malabsorptive gastrointestinal enteropathies although it may be used to refer directly to tropical sprue. It is composed of two entities: tropical sprue non-tropical sprue / coeliac disease In each, the radiologic features are not sensitive enough to confi...
Article

Coffee-bean sign (sigmoid colon)

The coffee-bean sign (also known as the kidney bean sign or bent inner tube sign 4) is a sign on an abdominal plain radiograph of a sigmoid volvulus although some authors have also used the term to refer to closed loop small bowel obstructions. Caecal volvulus may be mistaken with sigmoid volvul...
Article

Veiled right kidney sign

The veiled right kidney sign is a sonographic sign described in pneumoretroperitoneum, most commonly due to duodenal perforation. It refers to the appearance of the right kidney on transabdominal ultrasound 1-4. On ultrasound, there is difficulty in obtaining images of the right kidney due to i...
Article

Gastrinoma triangle

The gastrinoma triangle (or Passaro's triangle) is an anatomical area in the abdomen, from where the majority (90%) of gastrinomas are thought to arise.  Gross anatomy Boundaries The triangle is formed by joining the following three points: superiorly: confluence of the cystic and common bil...
Article

Necrotising pancreatitis

Necrotising pancreatitis (NP) represents the severe form of pancreatitis. It is considered a subtype of acute pancreatitis as necrosis usually tends to occur early, within the first 24-48 hours, but can also rarely occur with subacute forms. A key feature is a significant amount of pancreatic a...
Article

Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas

Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are the most common cystic neoplasm of the pancreas and include: mucinous cystadenoma of pancreas mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) of the pancreas: sometimes classified separately
Article

Fishtail pancreas

Fishtail pancreas (also known as pancreas bifidum or bifid tail of the pancreas) is a rare anatomical variant of the pancreas produced by a branching anomaly during its development. It is named as such due to the fishtail-like appearance of the pancreas. Epidemiology It is a rare anatomical an...
Article

Spigelian hernia

Spigelian hernia, also known as lateral ventral hernia, is a type of abdominal hernia along the semilunar line, resulting in herniation between the muscles of the abdominal wall. Epidemiology They are rare and account for ~1% (range 0.1-2%) of ventral hernias 2-3. The incidence is thought to p...
Article

Postoperative free intraperitoneal gas

Postoperative free intraperitoneal gas refers to the presence of gas in the peritoneal cavity following a surgical procedure and may result from open or laparoscopic surgical techniques.   Terminology Postoperative free intraperitoneal gas is also referred to as postoperative pneumoperitoneum...
Article

Peptic ulcer disease

Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) encompasses a number of entities, united by the presence of mucosal ulceration secondary to the effects of gastric acid. Since the recognition of Helicobacter pylori as a common causative agent, and the development of powerful anti-acid medications, peptic ulcer diseas...
Article

Normal gastrointestinal tract imaging examples

This article lists examples of normal imaging of the gastrointestinal tract and surrounding structures, divided by modality. Plain radiograph example 1: abdominal film example 2: erect and supine example 3, example 4: paediatric example 5: young adult male Barium studies example 1, exampl...
Article

Splenic haemangiomatosis

Splenic haemangiomatosis involves multiple, diffuse splenic haemangiomas replacing its entire parenchyma. It is a very rare entity. Pathology It can occur as a manifestation of systemic angiomatosis or, less commonly, confined to the spleen (diffuse isolated splenic haemangiomatosis). There is...
Article

Splenic lesions and anomalies

There are a number of splenic lesions and anomalies: Congenital anomalies accessory spleen wandering spleen asplenia polysplenia splenogonadal fusion retrorenal spleen Mass lesions Benign mass lesions splenic cyst (mnemonic) splenic pseudocyst splenic haemangioma: commonest benign sp...
Article

Gastric outlet obstruction

Gastric outlet obstruction is a syndrome resulting from mechanical obstruction of stomach emptying. Pathology Aetiology Gastric outlet obstruction can be due to malignant or benign causes. Malignant adenocarcinoma (second most common 4) GIST lymphoma (less commonly than other malignancies...
Article

Colorectal cancer (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Colorectal cancer, also called colorectal carcinoma (CRC), is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract and the second most frequently diagnosed malignancy in adults. CT and MRI are the modalities most frequently...
Article

Investigating PR bleeding (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Investigating PR bleeding radiologically may help to make a diagnosis or give more information after a diagnosis has been established. Radiology should not replace appropriate physical examination or appropriate use of sigm...
Article

Diverticulitis (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Diverticulitis is one of the presentations of diverticular disease and is most often a complication of colonic diverticulosis. Differentiating one from the other is critical since uncomplicated diverticulosis is mostly asym...
Article

Gastric cancer (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Gastric cancer, also known as stomach cancer or gastric carcinoma, refers to a cancer that arises from the mucosal lining of the stomach. It is the commonest gastric malignancy. Reference article This is a summary article...
Article

Pneumoperitoneum (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists Pneumoperitoneum describes gas within the peritoneal cavity and is often the harbinger of a critical illness, often perforation of a hollow viscus. Pneumoperitoneum is distinct from pneumoretroperitoneum (much rarer) and ma...
Article

CT abdomen (summary)

This is a basic article for medical students and other non-radiologists CT abdomen is an increasingly common investigation that is used to help make diagnoses of a broad range of pathologies. A CT abdomen in its simplest form is a CT from diaphragm to symphysis pubis performed 60 seconds after ...

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