Jones fracture

A Jones fracture is an extra-articular fracture at the base of the fifth metatarsal

It is a transverse fracture at the base of the fifth metatarsal, 1.5 to 3 cm distal to the proximal tuberosity at the metadiaphyseal junction, without distal extension. 

Mechanism

The fracture is believed to occur as a result of significant adduction force to the forefoot with the ankle in plantar flexion 5.

Plain radiograph/CT

Jones fracture is located at the metadiaphyseal junction, approximately 2 cm (1.5-3 cm) from the tip of the 5th metatarsal, and has a predominantly horizontal course. It should not extend distally, nor should it extend to involve the articular surfaces.

In contrast to avulsion fractures, Jones fractures are prone to non-union (with rates as high as 30-50%) and almost always take longer than two months heal 2

As displacement of the fracture can be increased with persistent weight bearing, immobilization is important as part of the initial therapy, with a non-weight bearing cast for 6-8 weeks.  

Internal fixation and even bone grafting may be required in cases of non-union, or where the fracture is significantly displaced. 

It was first described by Sir Robert Jones in 1902 3.

A number of fractures occur at the base of the 5th metatarsal (see fractures of the proximal fifth metatarsal) as well as entities which mimic fractures. These include:

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Article information

rID: 1537
Tags: foot, fracture
Synonyms or Alternate Spellings:
  • Jones' fracture
  • Jones fractures

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Cases and figures

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    Figure 1: proximal 5th metatarsal fractures
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    Case 1
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    Case 2: with background osteopetrosis
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    Case 3
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